Kunwinjku Counting Book creators in talks with US publishers

Aboriginal artist's state funeral attracts hundreds
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Fibre art exhibition attracts massive crowds
Gunbalanya's youngest artists celebrate happiness
(Supplied: Injalak Arts) 105.7 ABC Darwin

By

Emilia Terzon

Posted

November 29, 2016 12:20:06

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The book features animal paintings for children by Gunbalanya artist Gabriel Maralngurra (centre).
So the not-for-profit gallery decided to try out crowdfunding for the first time, with a video pledge and mission statement promising “love from Gabriel” and free children’s books if they reached a goal of $25,000 to print 2,500 more books.The campaign ended up surpassing its goal by almost $8,000.Book ‘important for preserving’ languageOff the back of the crowdfunding campaign, Injalak was approached by a publisher in the United States.”We just got some pretty exciting news from America that there’s somebody maybe interested in pushing it further to distribute further,” Injalak’s Dave Wickens said.Set in escarpment country just a stone’s throw from Kakadu National Park, Gunbalanya is known for its distinct earthy painting style, hidden rock art going back 10,000 years, and screenprinted fabrics often turned into cushions, upholstered furniture and clothing. People want to know more. (Supplied: Injalak Arts)
Mr Wickens said American, German and French tourists who visited Gunbalanya, about 250 kilometres from Darwin, were often the biggest fans of the region’s style.”Overall there seems to be more attention internationally on Indigenous subjects. After being knocked back for an expansion grant, the creators of a West Arnhem Land children’s counting book have smashed a crowdfunding campaign and are in talks with an international publisher.The book features animal paintings by Gunbalanya artist and Injalak Art Centre co-manager Gabriel Maralngurra, alongside text in both the community’s dominant language, Kunwinkju, and English.”It just came into my head,” Mr Maralngurra said of the idea for the book.The Kunwinkju Counting Book created in collaboration with Injalak’s Amber Young and Felicity Wright was initially printed earlier this year as a limited run to sell at the art centre and galleries in Darwin.”It’s for the kids, non-Indigenous kids and Indigenous kids, around Gunbalanya,” Mr Maralngurra told 105.7 ABC Darwin.After the book took off in the Top End, its creators were approached by a grant provider but were knocked back for funding after applying. Photo:
West Arnhem Land is escarpment country near Kakadu and features rock art going back at least 10,000 years. An adult could pick this book up and learn a lot from it, whether it’s just about the native flora and fauna that Gabriel has used.”Mr Maralngurra described the book as unique due to his detailed and “slow painting” style, with each of its 12 featured artworks taking about two-and-a-half days each.His 12 original works have since been sold to a private collector and Injalak is hoping to do more crowdfunded-financed books with other artists, of which there are 300 throughout the community.The book is being re-printed on recycled paper in Melbourne and is expected to be sold across Australia. People are excited to help support that.”From a personal perspective, I think this book is very important for preserving Indigenous language and being a tool for [children] who speak Kunwinkju, but also for non-speaking people to learn a new language.”[This is] not just what you’d call a kids book. External Link:

The video that led the Kunwinjku Counting Book's crowdfunding campaign.

Street artists to daub Port Adelaide’s public walls

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No heritage listing for Port Adelaide's Fishermen's Wharf Market building
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November 28, 2016 11:26:59

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Completed artwork on the wall of a Saint Vincent Street building.
City Of Adelaide clipper eyed by Port Augusta

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An artist works on one of the biggest and most striking street artworks at Port Adelaide. (Supplied: Renewal SA)

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Artist Smug One at work on s scissor lift. (Supplied: Renewal SA)
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Street artists will transform Port Adelaide into an open-air art gallery when a three-day festival is held next April.Local and international mural artists will daub the main streets and tiny lanes of the Port with works aimed at giving the north-western suburb a unique identity in Adelaide.More than 20 artists contributed when the inaugural Wonderwalls festival was held early last year.Artistic director Joel Cooke, whose own artworks bear the name Vans the Omega, said it was exciting that artists would be given another chance to liven up the walls of old warehouses, hotels and other buildings, both old and new, of Port Adelaide.”Wonderwalls brings together some of the world’s most highly acclaimed street artists to work alongside Adelaide’s finest and we expect some of the murals to be the largest ever seen in Australia,” he said.South Australian government agency Renewal SA is leading community efforts to economically revive Port Adelaide while marking its distinctive maritime history.Infrastructure Minister Stephen Mullighan said the street art was an important part of that.”Anyone who has visited the Port in the past couple of years would find it hard to miss the giant murals on the old Marine and Harbours building, which send a signal that this precinct is a place of renewal,” he said.”The interactive exhibitions will transform blank walls into stunning works of art entirely unique to Port Adelaide.”As part of the Port’s revival, there are plans for nearly 23 hectares of waterfront land in the Port River precinct to be turned from industrial use into apartments and other retail and commercial development.

City Of Adelaide clipper assured of Port Adelaide home
Port Adelaide street art
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Artist Kab101 paints the door of a Port Adelaide warehouse. (ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)

Hobart unites behind promising soccer players

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Carol Rääbus

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November 28, 2016 11:57:46

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Coach Eddie Mohammed with one of the Hobart United FC players selected for Canberra, Lio Nduwayo. (936 ABC Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
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Melbourne City hooks up with Tasmanian soccer to foster young talent
We understand each other very well.”And while fostering a sense of community is a major part of the soccer club, success in the sport is, of course, the first objective.Picked for national tournamentAlong with his team-mate Shartiel Tuyishime, Lio has been selected to represent his state in a national soccer tournament in Canberra this month. Lio Nduwayo has been playing soccer for as long as he can remember.But since arriving in Hobart as a refugee with his family, soccer has helped him feel a deeper sense of belonging.”We become less anxious and stuff about what people are thinking [on the soccer field],” he told Ryk Goddard on 936 ABC Hobart.”It’s just like all of us are basically the same. (Supplied: Hobart United FC)
“It’s a lot of hard work and dedication,” Lio said.”You can’t really do as much stuff with your friends because you’ve got a lot of training going on after school, and when you go home you just sleep because you’re tired.”The tournament will see the boys play in front of various talent scouts, giving them a shot at advancing in the sport — but first they need to raise $1,500 each to get there.Hobart United FC is putting on a fundraiser called Let’s Play Together at the Moonah Art Centre on Tuesday night to help get the boys to Canberra.The event will feature music from Afghanistan and South Sudan, representing a small section of the background of the players at the club. There’s no different colour or culture or anything.”Lio plays for Hobart United FC. The team is largely made up of former refugees from various cultural and language backgrounds.Universal language of soccerEddie Mohammed has been the coach of Hobart United FC for about 12 years.”Different cultures, different languages — it is hard,” he said about communication between members.”But through the soccer, it’s one language. Photo:
Shartiel Tuyishime (left) and Lio Nduwayo have been selected to attend a national soccer tournament in Canberra this month.

Why music is not lost

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Ausmusic Month: Making music in regional Australian studios

Does the rise of streaming mean the loss of music?
Revenues from live performances are expected to grow. The Conversation

By Professor Richard Vella, Shane Homan and Tracy Redhead

Posted

November 28, 2016 07:21:47

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Punters cheer at an Australian festival. (ABC)
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The 2015 Worldwide Independent Network report on the global economic and cultural contribution of independent music showed that independent labels have 37.6 per cent of the global market, worth $5.6 billion.In relation to music distribution, academic Patrick Wikstrom writes that technological changes consist of three models: ownership, access and context. Video: Justin Timberlake on trolls, technology and evolution

(7.30)
Musicians today must be multi-skilled. The royalties paid back to artists for streaming or YouTube dissemination are minimal — only massive amounts of streams can produce substantial income. The revolution in the 1990s of audio software platforms such as Protools and Cubase enabled creators to be producers of their own music, cutting costs dramatically. The music industry is currently in a state of flux — due to the internet and digitisation — as are many other industries affected by technological and social changes. (ABC)
The CD as calling cardAs with all previous eras, the music industry is highly competitive. The release of new cars and computers without in-built compact disc drives is further evidence of the change in consumer behaviour. A recent Price Waterhouse report predicted revenue from performances would rise by 3 per cent annually through to 2020. This is the “value gap”. In Australia, combined revenue from all income streams for musicians actually increased last year to a historically high growth rate of more than 12 per cent, according to APRA-AMCOS.Crucially, in Australia, digital revenue (downloads, basic and “premium” streaming services, on-demand video, website use and user-generated services) provided the impetus for growth from $47 million to $68 million from 2015 to 2016. But this endless re-working/bundling/re-contextualisation of digital music is, of course, not well served by older 19th Century frameworks of copyright protection.Many income streamsToday’s musician relies upon many income streams: live performance, royalties from performance, recordings, synchronisation rights, teaching, licensing, merchandising etc. This has provided some correction to earlier industry periods bereft of answers to the spectacular rise of downloads and file-sharing of music mp3s through computer systems.Obstacles remain. The consumer transforms from passive recipient to active co-creator. Musicians must adjust to these changes and to consumer demands.This means not just changing distribution formats of music, but also musical forms. Suddenly, music was being played with no compensation or income streams available.Record companies worried that sales would drop. When radio became popular in the 1920s, many believed this was the end for recording artists and live music. The “ownership model” has dominated the last century with the sale of recorded music on formats like CDs and records.The “access model” refers to the rise of online subscription-based music streaming services like Spotify. These days there is now music that adjusts to your mood or activity like Spotify “running”, a playlist tailored to keep energy levels up while exercising, or Melody’s Virtual Reality player, which will allow audiences to watch and stream concerts in 360 degree surround visual and audio from their own lounge room.The increased complexity of digitisation, and related changes to cultural products, business, trade and consumption, require massive innovation. Photo:
Montaigne accepts the ARIA for Breakthrough Artist (AAP: Paul Miller)

Can’t get enough of the ARIAs? Each block is like an individual bank statement and a permanent record of a transaction. Also needed are innovative new copyright and royalty models before new revenue streams can be realised.Richard Vella is the Professor of Music at the University of Newcastle; Shane Homan is an Associate Professor in English, Communications and Performance Studies at Monash University; and Tracy Redhead is a senior researcher in Music Export and Technology at the University of Newcastle. It is transparent, open and immutable. But independent music labels — which provide an important platform for new talent and music-making — are disrupting this paradigm with new business models and artist/audience relationships. However, history shows these industries are always in flux. Consumers are now informed, connected, empowered and consequently have more market power. It requires continual exposure through performance and/or product availability via distribution and social media platforms. While aggregator services such as YouTube rely heavily on advertising, hundreds of millions of users can freely upload and watch content, producing a significant gap between usage and payment. Venue owners believed people wouldn’t go out and see live music any more. The authors are part of a research team investigating the economic and cultural value of the Australian music export.Originally published in The Conversation. (12-inch mixes of LPs, for example, came in response to DJs sampling and creating mix tapes in the late 1980s and early 90s). Musicians’ Unions and Performing Rights Associations fought for compensation and a slice of radio advertising revenue.This is a complex story to summarise, but it took nearly 15 years to implement new copyright and royalty models for musicians. (Flickr: monophonicgirl)
Social media platforms have enabled musicians and music companies to develop new strategies for distribution that disrupt the more traditional linear supply chains dominated by the major record labels.Under the old, linear model, a series of intermediary steps (contracts, production, publishing, distribution, promotion) eventually lead to a retail outlet. In the first decade of this century, the emergence of web 2.0 has propelled the democratisation of production tools resulting with the rise of “the Produser” (coined by Axel Bruns) — part producer, part user.The new digital economy is a shared economy, built increasingly upon user-led content creation. It is not enough to be “talented” and hope to be discovered. A “context model” enables audiences to “do things with music”. These days the CD, like vinyl recordings, has become more like a calling card and promotional free giveaway by artists. Australian music sounds like … For Spotify, royalties are around $0.006-$0.0085 per play; YouTube is $0.001.A legislative solutionBut the solution is legislative. We asked some stars of Australian music a simple question: “What does Australian music sound like?”
To state the obvious: contemporary music industries are struggling to find new ways to connect with audiences and create value in their products and services. There is now a worldwide push to address this value gap so that more of the royalties go to the copyright owners. Photo:
Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker recording in a farm house near Bunbury. For musicians, it has the potential to be a smart contract embedded within a music file that automatically sends licensing, payments and usage agreements to anyone using that file around the world.Blockchain is in its early days, with problems still to be solved (relating to bandwidth and issues of consumer trust), but it could signify the future. The loss of music Whenever you listen to a streamed song, like it but don’t buy it and instead stream it again, you are casting a vote for the future nonexistence of professional musicians, writes Professor Peter Godfrey-Smith. Once music has been digitised, it can be changed into any format. Amongst other things, it would oblige companies such as YouTube to work with copyright holders (labels, publishers, individuals) and address the value gap between those who own the rights for music and the creators of it.Then there is Blockchain, currently being trialled by global banks and seen by some in the music industry as a possible future solution to copyright problems.Blockchain is a public decentralised ledger used in digital currencies. Test your knowledge with our quizCheck out the best photos from the red carpetSee which Aussie acts have won Best Album over the yearsAnd were you at the 1996 Crowded House concert? In September this year, the European Commission published a proposal on copyright in the Digital Single Market to address the value gap. Streaming, downloading and stem releases (the creation of groups of audio tracks, processing them separately prior to combining them into a final master mix) are for the moment the main consumption models (with a nostalgic resurgence in high quality vinyl).This fact is reflected in the 2015 International Federation of the Phonographic Industry report, which shows that digital sales of music made up 45 per cent of the market.Physical sales (CDs, vinyl) comprised 39 per cent, with performance rights (broadcasting royalties) at 14 per cent and synchronisation (rights aligned with uses such as film soundtracks) at 2 per cent.Beyond digital sales, the other growth trend is in live performance revenues. Photo:
Nick Murphy, formerly known as Chet Faker, is signed by independent Australian record label, Future Classic. But as the radio example shows, there is a well documented history of musicians adapting to technological and social changes over the past century.As long as there is technological innovation, musicians and the industry that supports them will either embrace these changes or feel threatened. Survival today requires musicians embrace these new approaches — either individually or collectively — in order to reach their audiences.This is hard work.

When music lover Julian Scharf got his hearing back, he threw a party for his new ears

By Monique Ross

Posted

November 28, 2016 06:07:30
He likens it to watching a house full of photo albums go up in flames.”I was still always playing songs in my head. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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A stack of records are seen at Julian Scharf’s party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Julian Scharf flicks through records at his party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
Doctors think Julian’s hearing loss began when he was three, but he wasn’t diagnosed until he was eight.In the middle of last year, the Brisbane father of two rapidly lost the hearing he did have. But for Julian Scharf, it’s different.He’s only hearing the records he’s spinning thanks to his “robot ear” — a cochlear implant that’s embedded in his head.”I’m just so happy that music’s back in my life,” says Julz, as he is known to his mates. External Link:

How a cochlear implant works
Initially the quality in his left ear was “choppy” or “pixelated”.”It literally sounds like the audio equivalent of a low-resolution photo. Lost and sound Julian Scharf once thought he’d never hear music again. “Jazz is so much better than it was. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
In May, salvation came in the form of a cochlear implant in his left ear. That was really, really cool.”

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Myles Scharf plays with glow sticks at a party on November 19, 2016. But every now and then I see someone with a different disability to myself, and I think ‘wow, it must be really hard for them’. I can hear it and feel the surge of energy again, and I definitely do not take that for granted,” he says. At the start we played a few tracks together, and he decided what the next song would be. And live sounds are phenomenal.”

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Two girls wear neon face-paint at Julian Scharf’s party on November 19, 2016. And I would not have thought to be able to listen to that,” Julian says. With a hearing aid you can’t hear the form of the song, you can’t follow the beat.”And there are already plans for another party.”We have so many songs to listen to. We had this red double cassette album of the Beatles — all the super poppy ones from the early ’60s, like Love Me Do,” he recalls. “Because it just doesn’t compare. Everything sounds like R2D2, and squawky, and chipmunky, and robotic,” Julian says.But it slowly got better, and Julian began to rediscover the music he thought he’d lost forever.”I can hear music and feel the euphoric nostalgia again. I can forget to put my hearing aid in, and not notice. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
The quality of Julian’s hearing is now better than ever before.”It’s amazing how little hearing I had, and how much more obvious that is now I have a cochlear implant. As the sun goes down, the dance floor fires up. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Children play at Julian Scharf’s party on November 19, 2016. It’s 70 guitar tracks layered over each other, and it creates this tunnel of sound. “And then I have to do a little check on myself, and think ‘I wonder if people might be looking at me in the same way’. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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A Blondie record at a party thrown by Julian Scharf on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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The dance floor starts to pick up steam. It made the time go quicker, it made things more fun.”The idea of not being able to have those memories with my own children was really hard.”

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Julian Scharf DJs at his party on November 19, 2016. And then I look at them again, and see that they’re just taking it in their stride, so it’s not that big of a deal, they’re just doing their thing, like I am.”

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Julian Scharf DJs under lights at his party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
The party, complete with a garage disco, was his way of celebrating “old stuff, new stuff, good stuff, bad stuff, cool stuff, not-so-cool stuff” — and the trove of memories those tunes bring back.On the playlist was everything from James Brown to Daft Punk, Led Zepplin, The Smiths, Joy Division, Michael Jackson, Blondie, AC/DC, The Dandy Warhols, David Bowie, The Cure and Coldplay — but not, Julian jokes, U2, who “still suck”.”We just played music all night — my cousins, and my wife, and my mum, and my friends danced all night. I was putting on record after record, it was really good fun,” Julian says.”There was quite a few people there that I haven’t seen in a very long time.”The best part was sharing music with [my son] Myles. I couldn’t hear it, I couldn’t feel it.”

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Julian Scharf looks for a record to play during his party on November 19, 2016. Photo:
Julian Scharf’s hearing loss hit ‘severe to profound’ levels last year. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Julian Scharf listens to a party guest on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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People gather in Julian Scharf’s backyard during a party on November 19, 2016. But it just is what it is,” he says.”I don’t really see myself as being too different to anyone else. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
The backyard party looks just like any other: friends laugh and swap stories over a beer, as children play on the grass. “Mum just used to play them all the time, in the car, wherever we would go, and it just melded into our brains. But that isn’t how he sees it. There’s an album called Sketches of Spain by Miles Davis that I love. I can’t remember ever having much of an enjoyment for any kind of orchestral production. (ABC News: Monique Ross) (ABC News: Monique Ross)
It’s about to get even better for Julian.Tomorrow he is getting a cochlear implant in his right ear, and says he is “full-blown excited”.”Right now there’s no sound coming in my right ear at all. The contrast is huge,” he says.Music, which was always turned down so Julian could hear basic sounds and conversations, now plays constantly, and he’s discovering new loves on a daily basis.He recalls being “flooded with tears” three tracks into Jeff Buckley’s Grace, loving Joy Division’s “gorgeously heavy” Unknown Pleasures and thinks Led Zeppelin “sounds epic”.”Two days ago I put on this album by My Bloody Valentine — it’s really heavy, thick, distorted guitar. It was a scary step for Julian — if it didn’t work, he’d be worse off.But it did, and Julian’s world “exploded”.Unlike hearing aids, which just make sounds louder, the electronic implant does the work of the damaged parts of the inner ear, or cochlea, to provide signals to the brain.”The mapping process is pretty weird and interesting — you’re getting your brain stem directly stimulated, and then over the next couple of months your head tries to make sense of that,” Julian says. It’s gorgeous — he actually recorded it with an orchestra. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Julian Scharf’s music taste ranges from classical to electro, and everything in between. I’d always wake up with a song in my head,” he says.”I didn’t stop grooving in my own way to the music I already had in my mental hard-drive.”But I just couldn’t add any new music. Photo:
Julian Scharf chats to guests at his party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Julian Scharf’s backyard full of people attending his party on November 19, 2016. Photo:
“To infinity and beyond” written in neon paint on the floor at Julian’s party. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Decorations at Julian Scharf’s party on November 19, 2016. Photo:
Julian Scharf plays music during his party. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Julian Scharf kisses his wife Roxanne on the dance floor at his party on November 19, 2016. I can have the battery in my hearing aid go completely flat, and not know how long it’s been off for,” he says.”Still, every now and then I’ll turn my implant off, and just listen with my hearing aid ear and think, ‘I’m about to lose this, do I really want to do this?’ And the answer is yes, I do. And the garage is already a disco!” Julian laughs. But this song-loving papa’s got a brand new bag, and he threw a party to celebrate. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Myles Scharf plays with glow sticks at his father Julian’s party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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The neon paints and blue lights that transformed Julian’s garage were a hit with the kids. “It’s definitely not just electronic music now, it’s everything. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
As Julian’s hearing faded, the world of music that had always filled his life got smaller and smaller. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Myles Scharf plays with glowsticks during his father Julian’s party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
Friendships built around music ground to a halt, and a devastated Julian mourned the loss of a future where he shared songs with his kids.”With my childhood, it was all about music. Julian says while things like playing guitar would be easier if he could hear like everyone else, it’s not that big a deal.”I can understand why they might think that. His hearing aids lost clarity, and he was left “pretty much totally deaf”.”With my hearing aids out, I could mow the lawn and not hear anything, or use an angle grinder and not hear anything,” the 32-year-old says, explaining his ‘severe to profound’ level of hearing loss.”I could go clubbing and be standing right next to the speaker and not hear a thing.”

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A Lou Reed album is seen at Julian Scharf’s party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)
When they talk about Julian, his friends use words like “courageous” and “brave” and “legendary”. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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A girl plays with neon paints at Julian Scharf’s party on November 19, 2016. (ABC News: Monique Ross)

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Julian’s nickname written in neon paint on the floor of his garage.
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A hip tradition: Hula is a way of life for Hawaiians

“King Kalakaua said hula is the heartbeat of the Hawaiian. “I connect with my Hawaiian genealogy in a deeper way because the dances and songs that I was taught as a young girl contain stories that survived time,” she said.But Ms Dalire said the hula is for everyone who wants to learn and appreciate the art. From a young age, everyone raised in Hawaii is expected to learn the hula. (ABC News: Stephanie Chen)
Ms Makainai believes people are attracted to the hula because they can sense the positive meaning hidden in the Hawaiian people’s songs and dances.”I think people come to our shows because they looking for a message that actually already lives within them,” she said. as long as you learn it in the right way and you’re taught real hula from a good and positive and strong source,” she said.Ms Dalire and Ms Makainai were in Melbourne for a one-day performance. But while most people appreciate the entertainment value of Hawaii’s famed dance, others might not understand the techniques and strength needed to do the hula, or the history and culture being expressed in the dancer’s movements.For Hawaiians, the dance is a way of life, a way to connect to their land, history and people. to be able to express ourselves.” (ABC News: Stephanie Chen)
2010 Na Hoku Hanohano Female Vocalist of the Year Award winner Mailani Makainai, said despite being mixed race, she connects to her Hawaiian identity the most. Photo:
Hula dance students taking part in a concert in Melbourne. Photo:
The dance was phased out by missionaries and brought back decades later. “Everyone should be able to dance hula because hula is healing … (ABC News: Stephanie Chen)
Kaui Dalire, hula teacher of Halau Ka Lihilihilehua ‘O Hopoe Kuikanani dance studio, said it was a way to preserve traditions which were at risk of being eradicated only a century ago. There is something about the hula that has always captivated people around the world. and it forms the values I pass on to my children.”

Five hula tips by Noelani Le NevezStand up tall with knees bent for strength and stabilityPractice stepping your feet side to side, and moving your hips in a circular motionEnsure arm movements are extended, clean and gracefulTo understand and connect to the dance, research and understand the storySmile! “I really enjoy travelling the world and sharing this aloha with all the people that I meet and being here in Australia and being able to share the Hawaiian culture and to be able to share hula has been amazing,” Ms Dalire said. “Whether you’re Hawaiian or not we all have a human need, a human desire, to be able to express ourselves and [I think] people gravitate towards the Hawaiian culture because we are able to express those needs, those desires and those feelings in our music and in our dance.”That’s what it is, that’s is our message.” “Passing on the traditions that was passed down to me from my mother is a responsibility that I believe I have to fulfil,” she said”In Hawaiian we call it Kuleana, it’s our responsibility to keep these traditions alive … You stop the hula, you stop the Hawaiian, therefore killing our Hawaiian people,” Ms Dalire said.”And it’s true because if no-one knows how to dance hula or know the chants then our stories and our histories will all be lost so hula is important in that it keeps Hawaiians moving forward together in these ever-changing times.”

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“Whether you’re Hawaiian or not, we all have a human need… The hula was finally welcomed back into mainstream Hawaiian culture during King David Kalakaua’s reign. When American Protestant missionaries first arrived in Hawaii in 1820 the dance was forcibly phased out.
(ABC News) By Stephanie Chen

Updated

November 26, 2016 15:51:59

Video: Noelani Le Nevez on the power of the hula.
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Central Queensland girls bucking the science trend

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Five women making strides in the science world
What can men do to stem the exodus of women from science?

ABC Capricornia

by Vanessa Jarrett

Updated

November 25, 2016 16:25:22

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Tylar Cunzolo is heading to the NASA Space School in the US to work on designing a plan to go to Mars in 2030. (ABC Capricornia: Vanessa Jarrett)
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Tylar has big plans for the future and hopes this will not be her last visit to NASA.”My ultimate goal is to go to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in America and become a computer scientist,” she said.”There are endless opportunities from there. It just grew from there.”

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Courtney Smith will visit Brisbane next month to meet Nobel Laureate physicist Takaaki Kajita. I could go back to NASA and design the computers that go into space.”No need to be a man or living in city to get into scienceCourtney Smith also hopes to go to NASA one day, but for now she will more than happy to meet 2015 Nobel Prize winner, Japanese physicist Dr Kajita.”I am both nervous and very excited. Two Central Queensland high school students are packing their bags to pursue their studies, with trips to Brisbane and the USA on the radar.Tylar Cunzolo and Courtney Smith are both in year 11 at Rockhampton Girls’ Grammar School (RGGS) and won a STEM competition.Tylar is heading to the NASA Space School in the United States next month, while Courtney is travelling to Brisbane to learn from Nobel Laureate physicist Takaaki Kajita.While boys may outnumber girls in senior high school physics classes across Queensland, this was not the trend at RGGS.According to the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority 11,135 boys studied physics in years 11 and 12 last year, compared to just 4,460 girls.RGGS principal Christine Hills said 88 per cent of their students were taking a science subject.”For a girl from central Queensland to be given the opportunity to go to Houston, the epicentre of the space program, and for Tylar to have the curiosity to want to go is outstanding,” Ms Hills said.”And for Courtney being able to meet a world famous physicist, I just love the fact she is so curious about that world and she has been given this opportunity.”Girl from Comet off to NASAFor 16-year-old Tylar, ironically from the town of Comet, going to the NASA Space School was a dream come true.”I am thrilled about it, I can’t wait,” she said.”What I am looking forward to the most is the computers, looking at the coding and software behind what sends people to space.”We will learn about everything the engineers, the scientists and the astronauts do to go to space.”Tylar will spend two weeks at the NASA Space Centre and will be given an assignment to work with a small group to create a plan to go to Mars in 2030.”We get given a budget and within our team, we create a plan [for] how that would work and everything that would be involved,” she explained.”We will be doing astronaut training, learning about the gravity chamber, deep sea diving to stimulate weightlessness, we will look at Mars Rover prototypes and all the coding and technology.”I have always been fascinated by how everything works.”It started with a USB and I wanted to know how it all worked and how it stored all this information. I am excited because I come from Emerald and go to school in Rockhampton [and] we don’t get many opportunities like this,” Courtney said.”I am nervous because I am in year 11 physics and he is a physicist; I cannot compare to the amazing talent he has in his field.”Courtney will get to meet Dr Kajita, ask him her own questions and listen in on a presentation he will give with students from across the state.”Physics has been something I have been very interested in because it is so amazing — how we have come from stars and how we came to Earth,” she said.Courtney hopes to pursue a career in the sciences, currently often a male-dominated field.”I do find it daunting there are so many males in the field but I also think it is an opportunity that women can do anything,” Courtney said.”Women can achieve anything, do what they want to do, be where they want to be if we just put in the effort in.”The fact that I am regional student and a woman and I am going to Brisbane is just evidence that you don’t need to be in the city or a man to get into these fields.”
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Tadpoles in classrooms help students leap into their studies

(ABC Canberra: Penny Travers)
Each student has become a budding scientist, measuring and monitoring the tadpoles each week. “You see their eyes light up when they realise they’re doing work that real scientists do out in the real world,” Ms Jansen said. Tadpoles are transforming into frogs in classrooms across Canberra, much to the delight of students and teachers alike.”First they grow legs, then they grow arms, and then their tail starts to disappear and they turn into frogs,” year two student Archie said.The biological process of metamorphosis is one of nature’s wonders but usually occurs out of sight. “It’s amazing how just having a living creature in the room just provides that extra sense of vibrancy.”From habitat conservation to protecting water quality, the students have been learning environmental lessons.”Try not to litter and destroy their habitats,” eight-year-old Wren said.”To save frogs you should keep your cat and your dog inside at night time,” Archie said.Illegal to catch tadpoles, frogsIt is illegal to catch tadpoles and frogs unless you have a licence, so ACT Frogwatch started putting together the kits in 2010 after receiving requests from teachers eager to have tadpoles in their classrooms. “To do this pseudo-science at a very young age — just by observing things and noticing changes in this little animal, it wakes up this appreciation for nature and an appreciation for frogs.” Photo:
It is illegal to catch and move tadpoles or frogs in ACT waterways. (Ginninderra Catchment Group)
The program began with just five kits and has now grown to 120 kits, thanks to support from Rotary. “Our literacy focus has been on persuasive writing and it’s been fantastic having something tangible and real to write about,” Ms Jansen said. “Frogs are in dire straits worldwide, so it’s illegal in the ACT and in most other states in Australia to catch tadpoles or to catch any frog in any stage of life and displace them,” ACT Frogwatch coordinator Anke Maria Hoefer said. Photo:
Students Archie and Caitlin create informative posters promoting frog conservation. “It stays the same length but they just grow into it.”

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Weetangera Primary School students Maddy, Archie, Wren and Caitlin with their Frogwatch tadpole kit. (ABC Canberra: Penny Travers)
Weetangera Primary School’s year two classroom is one of 120 across the ACT and surrounding New South Wales to receive a Frogwatch tadpole kit.The kits include everything the students need to look after the spotted grass frog tadpoles as they transform over 10 weeks. “Most adults think that the tadpoles lose their tail but they actually grow into their tail,” eight-year-old Caitlin said. “It’s quite amazing even for me as an adult to watch how much they change,” learning assistance teacher Leone Jansen said.”The students just love them, they’re always checking in on them and observing their behaviour.”Literacy, numeracy and environmental lessons Teachers have been incorporating the tadpoles into all areas of the curriculum. “Every child should be exposed to these wonders of nature,” Ms Hoefer said.
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(ABC Canberra: Penny Travers) 666 ABC Canberra

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Penny Travers

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November 25, 2016 13:53:24

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Year two student Wren keeping a close eye on the tadpoles.

Monster crayons to help abused kids brought to life

Monster-shaped crayons set to help abused, neglected children
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Christian McKechnie and Ben Lees hope monster-shaped crayons will help charity Act For Kids. The dream of two advertising executives to help children who have faced abuse and neglect has come true thanks to a successful crowdfunding campaign.Christian McKechnie and Ben Lees designed Monster Crayons, a product they wanted to create to help support Act For Kids.The Australia-wide charity, which began in Brisbane, provides free, art-based therapy and support services for children and families. External Link:

Monster Crayons
They then used 3D printing to further refine the moulds.More than 200 packs of crayons are now ready for sale, with 10,000 packs to be delivered at the start of 2017.One hundred per cent of the profits from their sale will go to Act For Kids.The duo will sell the crayons through their Facebook page and in a major department store as of next year.”We really hope Monster Crayons will become fully self-sustaining and a successful product for Act For Kids,” Mr McKechnie said. every drawing takes away the child’s monster,” Mr McKechnie said.The prototypes were created by Mr McKechnie and Mr Lees by melting existing crayons in saucepans and pouring the mixture into moulds they created. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
The duo started crowdfunding last February, hoping to raise $20,000 to start manufacturing and distributing the crayons.”We had a guy who gave $10,000 after we did an interview on the ABC and $20,000 was donated from other people who heard us,” Mr McKechnie told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Rachel Fountain.”In the end we got just under $30,000 in total — it’s been amazing.”The idea for the crayons came after the duo spoke to therapists who said children going through abuse would attend art therapy classes and draw monsters.”It struck a chord with us and we wanted to turn it around …
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Jessica Hinchliffe

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November 25, 2016 11:46:09

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All profits from the monster crayons go to the children’s charity Act For Kids. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)

Afghani refugee girl named Lions number one women’s ticket holder

'Girls can do what boys do': Female fans inspired by women's AFL
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By

Peter Gunders

Updated

November 24, 2016 19:27:18

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Zimra Hussain fell in love with AFL soon after arriving in Toowoomba. (ABC Southern Queensland: Peter Gunders)
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“I don’t know if the general public really know what kind of triumph it is having a young Afghani girl playing mixed football.”

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Zimra Hussain started playing Aussie Rules after moving to Toowoomba in 2014. These people have come to our country looking for a new life, and we’re all cheering them on.” “Hers is a story of somebody who has had a huge struggle in life, found a passion, and followed her dream,” Ms Brock said. Her local football team, the University Cougars, play in the same colours as the Crows, and her favourite player is Eddie Betts.”She will support the Lions women’s side wholeheartedly,” her coach said.”But there’s no way we’re shifting her off Eddie Betts’s team. I can’t wait to see them play,” Zimra said.Her coach is very proud.”This kid tries with every part of her being,” Ross Savill said.”She wants to do well, and it’s not only with her footy. Toowoomba’s Zimra Hussain has been named the inaugural number one ticket holder for the Brisbane Lions AFL women’s team.The 10-year-old, nicknamed the Afghani Axe, was introduced to Aussie Rules two years ago, after arriving in southern Queensland with her mother and sister from Afghanistan.She has already played in an under-12s premiership winning team, and been picked for representative duties for the Darling Downs region. Ambassador still has soft spot for Adelaide Crows Now an ambassador for the Lions, Zimra proudly wears a Brisbane cap perched on top of her hijab.”I wore it all night,” she said.But she said she would always have a soft spot for the Adelaide Crows. “We may switch her men’s team allegiance, but that might only happen if we can get Eddie to move to Brisbane,” he laughed.The Crows sent Zimra a jersey, and Betts signed a birthday card that proudly sits next to Zimra’s Lions plaque.”It’s that sort of response that has been amazing,” Mr Savill said.”The wider community has just been brilliant.”It’s wonderful to see the support for people like Zimra. “There is a lot of talent out here,” she said. (Facebook: University Cougars)
Zimra and her family are part of the Hazara, a group heavily persecuted by the Taliban.She is one of dozens of refugee children in the regional city who have joined the University Cougars AFL team. Brisbane Lions Women’s chief executive Breeanna Brock said the young footballer embodied everything the AFL wanted to celebrate. “It’s amazing to be the number one ticket holder. I think people resonate with that kind of story.” The AFL national women’s league will kick off early in 2017, and Ms Brock is confident many young players from southern Queensland will have a future on the big stage. As the number one ticket holder, Zimra has been invited to play a role at the very first AFLW game in Brisbane in 2017.
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Fans of women's league want 'deeper connection', AFL warned

Meet nine-year-old Hunter: Rhino saviour and wildlife warrior

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ABC News Breakfast

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Patrick Wood

Updated

November 24, 2016 16:34:59

Video: Hunter Mitchell will receive the Wildlife Warrior award from Australia Zoo

(ABC News)
“I’m really angry that bad people are poaching these beautiful creatures so I want to make a difference to the world to stop rhino poaching,” Hunter said.Illegal poaching has decimated the rhino population in Africa in the past few decades and has brought the black rhino species to the brink of extinction.Conservation group the World Wildlife Fund estimates about 96 per cent of black rhinos were killed by poachers between 1970 and 1992, but conservation efforts have seen the population bounce back in recent years.Aquila Private Game Reserve conservation manager Divan Grobler said Osita was doing well and was a success story for conservationists.”He is weighing about 600kg at the moment [and] he’s very playful,” he told ABC News Breakfast.”We had to take [him] … (Supplied)
The award is recognition for Hunter’s efforts on behalf of Osita and rhino conservation in South Africa, but his work isn’t done yet.He visits Osita regularly, taking part in feeding and bathing tasks, and has also set his sights on bigger goals. When nine-year-old South African boy Hunter Mitchell heard about a baby rhinoceros that had been abandoned by its mother, he knew he had to help.The budding conservationist and keen rhino fan quickly organised a crowdfunding campaign to raise money to care for the calf — named Osita — which was at a nearby game reserve.”On the news I found out about this abandoned baby rhino who was born at Aquila Private Game Reserve, which is two hours from Cape Town,” Hunter told ABC News Breakfast.”I decided to help because he was really cute and he wasn’t going to live without his mother.”So I started to raise money for him.”Hunter’s public appeal raised more than 75,000 South African rand ($7,000) and he has since become an ambassador for the Aquila reserve.His efforts have brought him all the way to Australia, where he will be presented with the Visionary Wildlife Warrior award from Australia Zoo in Queensland this weekend. Photo:
Hunter Mitchell and Osita have formed a strong bond since the baby rhino was abandoned by his mother. into our own hands because we can’t lose that genetics.”That one genetics is so vital for conservation going forward into the rhino genetics pool for Africa.”

Queensland woman with rare ‘stiff person syndrome’ walks again thanks to new treatment

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Dr Geffen said before the surgery Mrs Hodges was unable to walk, use the toilet herself and would shake uncontrollably and then become very stiff and rigid.”I knew from my experience that it would have been impossible for somebody to pretend the symptoms,” Dr Geffen said. Photo:
Mrs Hodges said meeting Dr Saul Geffen in June was a moment that changed her future. (ABC News: Donna Field)
Rhonda Hodges said she remained determined to find out what was wrong despite being misdiagnosed.”Well I was really ticked off,” she said.”I really was, because I knew it wasn’t in my head and I was so furious with the doctors saying it was in my head.”Dr Geffen arranged for her to see neurologists at Brisbane’s Mater Hospital where a path was charted for her to have groundbreaking treatment.”People like Rhonda are the reason I do the job I do, Dr Geffen said.”It is the reward to really change people’s lives that makes this a wonderful rewarding career choice.”Neurosurgeon Rob Campbell conducted the surgery — inserting a pump that administers the drug baclofen.He said the procedure was used to treat other conditions, like cerebral palsy, but had never been used for stiff person syndrome in Australia.”The step forward here has been to push this envelope wider — to deal with this condition, this rare condition,” Dr Campbell said.He said the world is full of rare disease and it is important for doctors to keep an open mind.”Labels that are inappropriately attached to patients in diagnoses sometimes are very hard to shift, ” he said.Mrs Hodges had thought she was destined to go into a nursing home, but instead she is planning her visit to her grandchildren in Townsville for Christmas.”So this is just a miracle,” she said.”It did take a terrible toll on the family, but now that I’m better they just couldn’t be happier.”The medical team is hoping Rhonda Hodges’ story will resonate with other people in Australia who may suffer from stiff person syndrome. After being bedridden for 12 years, a Queensland woman with a rare condition is able to walk again thanks to the work of Brisbane doctors.Rhonda Hodges has stiff person syndrome and in an Australian first, doctors at the Mater Hospital inserted a pump that injects a drug into her spinal cord giving her mobility again.The 61-year-old from Toowoomba had been told her problem was all in her head.It was not until a chance meeting in June with a specialist in rehabilitation medicine, Doctor Saul Geffen, that her future changed.”When I saw my toes bend, I went ‘yes!'”, Mrs Hodges said.
(ABC: Donna Field) By Donna Field

Updated

November 24, 2016 16:46:04

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Rhonda Hodges (right) was unable to walk before her treatment.

Bringing Banksia vincentia back from the brink

ABC Illawarra

By ABC Open producer Sean O’Brien

Updated

November 23, 2016 17:31:00
An afternoon stroll by a nursery owner has turned up a new species of banksia that authorities are now working hard to protect.Jacki Koppman spied the unusual-looking banksia and thought it best to take a cutting which she sent to the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney for identification.Her instincts were spot on — the banksia turned out to be a new species.Now named Banksia vincentia, at the time it was discovered, there were just 14 individual plants in the wild. Photo:
Two people from the Office of Environment and Heritage planting the Banksia vincentia in the wild. Photo:
Dr David Bain is the Threatened Species Officer with the Saving our Species program at the Office of Environment and Heritage (ABC Open: Sean O’Brien)
Dr Bain has designed a three-step insurance plan for the banksia, including partnering with a number of botanic gardens including Wollongong Botanic Gardens, the Australian Botanic Gardens in Canberra, and gardens as far afield as the Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in the United Kingdom.”The species is in a dire situation, but I’m still optimistic we can keep this species alive,” Dr Bain said.”I regularly go to the site to look at the health of the plants, measure the width to see if they’ve grown, see if they’re in flower.”The five plants are looking really healthy, and we’ve got a couple of seedlings coming up as well which we’re excited about.”But looking after the plants in situ is only one part of the plan.”In case something catastrophic happens, we’re also building up insurance populations in the various botanic gardens, propagating the plants from cuttings, growing some plants from seeds, and also holding seed banks.”We’re hoping that eventually we can take some of these plants and re-establish new populations back in the wild.”What is future for Banksia vincentia?Currently there are 600 seeds in various seed banks and 24 plants have been germinated from seeds at the Australian Botanic Gardens.About 60 propagated cuttings are growing at botanic gardens throughout the NSW south-east, including at the Wollongong Botanic Gardens.Dr Bain hopes to get to several hundred plants growing in botanic gardens before plants are shifted into the wild. (Office of the Environment and Heritage)
“The challenge of saving Banksia vincentia is an investment by the NSW Government’s Saving Our Species program, which aims to protect almost 1,000 animals and plants at risk of extinction for the next 100 years in the wild,” Dr Bain said.”My hope for the Banksia vincentia is that we can have this plant surviving on its own in the wild without intensive management.”There’s an intrinsic value in all species and just for that reason alone, we don’t want to lose this species.”While the concern is always there for threatened species, I’m always optimistic, and I love my job.”I get to interact with lots of different people, I’m out in the bush regularly, building partnerships, and interacting with experts in the conservation and science field from around NSW, so it’s a really rewarding job.” That number is now down to five.The plants are growing in an area close to urban development and are susceptible to threats such as fire, pathogens, and even theft.Designing insurance plan for plant’s futureWith so few specimens, it would not take much to wipe out the entire population.Threatened species officer, Dr David Bain from the Saving our Species program at the Office of Environment and Heritage has a number of rare and threatened species under his care.Banksia vincentia is one of them.
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Meet the FIFO piano tuner battling heat and humidity

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Martin Tucker says the pianos in Darwin that are played regularly are in the best shape. A lot of things in the Top End swell up over the wet season — rivers, cane toads, even pianos.Yes, pianos, according to fly-in fly-out piano tuner Martin Tucker.Mr Tucker has been visiting Darwin every year for the past 10 years, tuning and tweaking the Top End’s baby grands and uprights in a never-ending battle with the wet. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Mike Kermode)
He told 105.7 ABC Darwin that pianos “like” humidity levels that hover between 30 and 50 per cent, which means the wet season average of around 80 per cent can cause them some grief.The steel strings can begin to rust and fabric wrappings become weighed down.”The felt swells up with the moisture in the air and that changes the sound.”It’s a bit like having a paperback book that you leave outside — if you leave it long enough over the wet season, the whole book swells up.”And if that’s the hammer that hits the string on a piano, if that swells up it just doesn’t sound very nice.”Flying north for the winterMr Tucker said his time tuning instruments in the Top End started around a decade ago when he flew up from Hobart to visit a friend.”They had a piano and being a piano tuner they said: ‘Can you bring up your tools?'”And then the neighbour said: ‘Can you do ours as well?’

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Martin Tucker tunes by ear and says there are now around 80 he services regularly around Darwin. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Mike Kermode)
Word spread and the trips became regular.”Every year I would get to Easter time in Tasmania, get quite cold, book a ticket up to Darwin and arrive here probably late May just as the dry was kicking in.”Mr Tucker said there were around 80 pianos across Darwin and a bit beyond which he tuned, semi-regularly, by ear — the old-fashioned way.”I’m a musician so that’s just how I do it.”The ear is the finest thing.” A steak on a cattle station in exchangeMost of Mr Tucker’s clients are within bike riding distance in the northern suburbs of Darwin.He said there was a piano at a croc cruise business on the Adelaide River that he had travelled to tune, and he liked to do at least one trip to Batchelor each year so he could go for a swim in nearby waterfalls.He has also tuned a piano in “very bad” condition for some pastoralists near Alice Springs.”It took me all day to fix,” he said.”But they had a cattle station and I got a steak for lunch — I was happy with that.”Like many dedicated experts, Mr Tucker is something of a purist and insists that all his clients really should get their pianos tuned at least once a year.He has even had to tell some that theirs was too far gone and needed to be replaced.”[There] comes a time, sometimes I tell my clients, ‘this is the last time I’m tuning this piano, if you’re serious about your piano you need to upgrade and get a new one’,” he said.”And what happens, a year, two years later, they ring me: ‘Martin, we really like our piano, it has a lot of sentimental value, can you come and give it one more tune?'”I go, ‘Oh, alright then, but this is the last time’.”
(105.7 ABC Darwin: Mike Kermode) 105.7 ABC Darwin

By Mike Kermode and Jacqueline Breen

Posted

November 23, 2016 15:42:30

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Martin Tucker has been flying from Tasmania to the Territory for the past 10 years to tune pianos.
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‘We love you’: Mosque ‘vandalised’ with messages of support

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United States
(Supplied: Muslim Youth CVA) By Paige Cockburn

Posted

November 22, 2016 19:57:29

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The mosque has invited the anonymous supporters to return so they can “reciprocate the love”.
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The mosque was subject to vandalism during its construction with doors and windows shattered. Photo:
One of the chalk messages left as a sign of support to members of the mosque. Graffiti is not often associated with positive messages, but the “vandalism” left at a US mosque from a particular group of “hooligans” was unusually heart-warming.”You are loved,” “we are your brothers & sisters” and “we are with you” were some of the messages of acceptance drawn onto paths leading into the Mubarak Mosque in Chantilly, Virginia. (Supplied: Muslim Youth CVA)
The anonymous supporters used chalk to fight back against anti-Muslim sentiment that has seen a surge in the United States, especially after President-elect Donald Trump while campaigning called for a ban on Muslims.The gesture meant even more in light of the fact that when the Mubarak Mosque was being built in 2012 it was subject to major vandalism, with about $US60,000 ($81,000) worth of damage caused.A member of the mosque, Qasim Rashid, posted photos of the artwork on social media saying “some sneaky hooligans ‘vandalised’ my mosque over the weekend” and described them as Muslim allies.Hibbi Iqbal, who also attends the mosque and is the secretary of public affairs in the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, was part of a group that arrived at the mosque early on Monday and saw the chalking.”We couldn’t help but be awe-struck,” he told the ABC.”The kids were beaming with delight and everyone else began pulling out their cameras in a race to be the first to spread the word to other members.”The mystery ‘vandals’ even left flowers by the door as if they didn’t do enough already.”Mr Iqbal says no-one has “the faintest of ideas” as to who came and left the messages, but said the mosque has a strong relationship with its neighbours who they often invite to events.”It wouldn’t surprise us at all if it was a group from any of the other religious communities in the area either,” he said.This is the mosque’s first taste of community feedback post-US election and “boy was it a good one”, Mr Iqbal said.The mosque has invited those who left the drawings to return so the mosque’s members can “reciprocate the love”.”If we are just with our friend and neighbours, they will be just with us and at the end of the day these are the bonds that will unite us against any forces seeking to destroy,” Mr Iqbal said. (Supplied: Muslim Youth CVA)