Baby delivered ‘safe and dry’ at ambulance station during Cyclone Debbie

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March 29, 2017 11:48:56
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@AnnastaciaMP: Best wishes to Billiana's proud parents – some good news in the midst of #CycloneDebbie & thank you to @QldAmbulance – exceptional work. As wind and rain from Cyclone Debbie unleashed havoc on the north Queensland coast, one family welcomed their new daughter into the world.Baby Billiana was born at 4:20am on Wednesday at the Whitsunday Ambulance Station at Cannonvale, near Airlie Beach.Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) tweeted the good news, confirming both mother and baby were “safe and dry”.QAS Director of Operations Dave Hartley said his crew got the call just after 4:00am that a woman was in labour in the Whitsunday area.”With all of the road closures and damage we couldn’t transport her to the hospital so we took her to the ambulance station where they delivered the baby girl,” he told the Courier Mail.”Everything is fine, it was a nice controlled delivery they are just waiting to assess things today to see if they can get her to hospital.”Queensland’s Minister for Ambulance Services, Cameron Dick, congratulated graduate paramedic Pamela for the successful delivery. Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk also tweeted her best wishes to the proud parents.”You know, out of all of this, to see a little miracle, I think brings a smile to a lot of faces and especially to all those people who have been working so hard overnight,” the Premier told a press conference. Photo:
Graduate paramedic Pamela holding the baby girl she delivered, (Twitter: @QldAmbulance)
“Amid the destruction of #CycloneDebbie the birth of #baby Billiana reminds us life is precious & by looking after each other, all will be okay,” he tweeted.
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Baby Billiana was born at 4:20am at the Whitsunday Ambulance Station.
'What else can you throw at us?' Locals emerge from cyclone zone
Live: Cyclone recovery begins as flood warnings extend to NSW border
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In photos: The aftermath of Cyclone Debbie
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Why I ditched the office to work outdoors in the city

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Hobart 7000
Pet taxi driver has the pawfect job

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Ms Case taking service dog Aaron to his day job. but in the end it’s ultimately worth it because you get more positive than negative moments,” she said.”You smile at the people as they go past, try and engage them, don’t just setup and try and make money and get out of there.”I see it was trying to brighten up the day, not just to get some money for me, just to put some music over an otherwise grey day like today.”The window cleaner

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Mr Macintosh moved his business to Hobart from Brisbane to escape the hot summers. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
“The challenge is the sun,” he said.”Tasmania still has the sun, just like Brisbane, and with me being very fair skinned I have to be always careful of how much exposure I have.”Mr Macintosh gave up an office job in quality checking for a jewellers to be out and about in his job.”It is very physical, tiring at the end of the day, [but] it’s something you get satisfaction out of … once it’s all complete and finished you can stand back and look at it and you have that sense of accomplishment that you’ve done something great and it looks fantastic,” he said.”It feels so wonderful to work so hard on something and make it look so good at the end.”The busker

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Katie K says busking shows the generous side of strangers. It might sound cheesy but each house can be like people. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
“There’s just too much fun to be had outside,” he said.With his six-month-old terrier by his side, Mr Fowler said he builds things, does landscaping, gardening, moves furniture — whatever needs doing.So far, there has not been a downside to the job.He even said he was “looking forward” to his first winter as an outdoor worker.”The biggest thing that keeps me going and taking on bigger and bigger projects is … They’re all different.”Windows are windows, but access to windows, how to go about cleaning them, it changes almost from job to job and it requires me to stay active in the latest technology to get the job done.”The pet taxi driver

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Ms Case loves animals of all sorts and being out and about means she gets to meet a lot of them. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
Before Catherine Case became a pet taxi driver, there were suburbs of Hobart she had never heard of before.”I’ve been to Perth, Garden Island, Ridgeway, all sorts of places,” she said.”I’ve seen places I never even knew existed in Hobart.”Ms Case worked in finance in the private and public sectors for years until ill health meant she had to leave her office job. Photo:
Mr Fowler will tackle just about any job someone needs doing. Working outdoors is not just for those on farms or out in the bush.All through March, a social media campaign using the hashtag #greendesking encouraged office workers to get outdoors for an hour.As these Hobart outdoor workers show, there are plenty of jobs that get people out and about in the city.The handymanDom Fowler quit his job running a fast food outlet three months ago to work with his hands doing all sorts of odd jobs around Hobart. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
She took on the job as a pet taxi driver to keep herself active and her job means she gets to meet lots of animals, of all sorts, who she helps by taking them to where they need to go.”I really love it,” she said.”I’ve met a lot of people, great people, wonderful dogs, cats and rabbits and I’ve even looked after sheep.”And they’re all animal lovers and that’s what I like, to meet people like that.” (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
Katie K is a working musician in Hobart and regularly busks to supplement her income.”If I’ve come up short with my budget and I have to busk it’s really nice knowing that the people in this town are so generous,” she said.”It’s nice to see that side of humanity in people.”There are a lot of very, very generous people in Hobart.”
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Katie K and Eloise busking
Katie said it took her some time to develop her busking skills as it “can be embarrassing”, while she had to get used to some people being very rude to her.”They give you dirty looks and I’ve had kids put garbage in my guitar case … (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
Kris Macintosh spends his days cleaning windows in summer and cleaning chimneys in the cooler months.He moved his business from Brisbane to Hobart for the weather, although that meant experiencing frozen fingers while cleaning windows in winter. Photo:
Mr Macintosh says just about everyone in Hobart has a good view so clean windows are important. I’m proud of the work I’ve done.”It can be interesting at times.
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(ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus) ABC Radio Hobart

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Carol Rääbus

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March 29, 2017 11:57:01

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Dom Fowler loves working out in the open with Arnie by his side.

Playground for adults (and kids) planned for Perth

Trouble-plagued Elizabeth Quay water park reopens
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Perth's Naturescape gets $3m upgrade
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(ABC Open: Mikaela Williams) ABC Radio Perth

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Emma Wynne

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March 29, 2017 17:15:38

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Architects hope the playground will help people of all ages rediscover the joy of swings and much more.
Reflecting on past and present playgrounds
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I go as high as I can and make loud noises of joyfulness — my granddaughter loves it, she shrieks with delight and it’s such fun,” Tracy said.”I love the idea of adult playgrounds. People need to understand that just because he is an adult size he still loves to play.””I am nearly 70 in years but young at heart and in my brain and I will be the first one at that playground,” one listener said via SMS. Construction has begun on a riverside playground in Perth which will invite people of all ages to jump on the swings and take a ride on a flying fox.The All Abilities Play Space is now in the early stages of construction at Beaton Park, on the Swan River foreshore at Nedlands.The $4 million project has been initiated by the City of Nedlands and funded by Rotary Clubs and public donations, and aims to let people of all ages be playful.The landscape architect who has designed the playground, Fiona Robbé, told ABC Radio Perth many adults wanted to use playgrounds but felt they were not supposed to.”I think that we are all playful human beings but we often lack the cues in our public environment to actually play,” Ms Robbe told ABC Radio Perth.”Much as we may all love to swing or spin, we feel shy about it because it is something that children do and it’s childish.”So this playground is designed in such a way that you are encouraged, all the cues are there.”The playground is expected to include traditional equipment like swings, slides and flying foxes as well as devices designed to improve physical agility.There will also be swings of all sizes — something Ms Robbe said had been a common request.”There will be scientific discoveries and a sensory walkway where you can experience different musical sounds,” she said.Swings for seniorsThe playground’s concept received an enthusiastic response from ABC Radio Perth listeners.”I always go on the swings with my granddaughter. My 23-year-old autistic son loves to go to swings and playgrounds but we are looked at strangely by other parents and children,” Kathy said.”It can feel very uncomfortable.