Kimberley teenager Gordon Churchill scores lead role in upcoming TV series

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Linda Foster is very proud Gordon scored one of the leading roles in The Warriors. Just giving back,” he said.Gordon and Linda have kept in contact throughout filming for The Warriors.When he told her he was flying to Melbourne for the premier she drove him to the airport.Linda said he never forgot her involvement in his success.”Every time he sees me he says ‘Thank you miss, thank you so much for your help’,” she said.The Warriors premieres Wednesday April 12 at 9:30pm on ABC. His aunt, Nancy Daylight, said the Gija community was very proud and would be holding a barbeque at the town’s art centre to watch her nephew make his small screen debut.But Gordon will not be watching his performance with his family.He will be at the premiere in Melbourne and said he was “stoked” to be representing Warmun. Not only myself, representing the people, the kids, the school, the community, the land. (Supplied: Linda Foster)
“Representing everyone.
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Behind the scenes on The Warriors: Vince Colosimo plays Marc Spinotti, the head coach of the team and Gordon Churchill plays Maki Birrawuy. (Supplied: Arena Media)
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Know the scripts and the meaning of the story of this video. Then probably after that, bought some new clothes and off to Melbourne,” he said.Now living the dream via his role in a national TV series, his acting debut is alongside Australian television alumni John Howard (Mad Max: Fury Road, Packed to the Rafters), Lisa McCune (It’s A Date, Blue Heelers) and Vince Colosimo (Janet King).So how does a young man from Warmun, who has never acted before, slot into his role in such esteemed company?Gordon said it is all about being himself. Photo:
Gordon Churchill plays number-one draft pick Maki Birrawuy in The Warriors. The township, also known as Turkey Creek, is a Gija community located on the Great Northern Highway, 3,009 kilometres north east of Perth.”The whole community is my family … Video: Gordon Churchill: Nervous start to filming

(ABC News)
Putting Warmun on the mapGordonl hopes The Warriors will put his home town of Warmun in the Kimberley region of Western Australia on the map. So I had a go at it, did the interview and the camera audition and stuff,” Gordon said.After recording his audition Linda sent it off to the casting agent.”Then it was over and Linda said ‘Oh, I hope you get it, fingers crossed’, and I said ‘I hope I do too’.”Small town dreams come trueGordon had dreams of making it big as an AFL star and modest ambitions to become an actor. Always there to lift me up, telling me ‘Don’t give up, just keep going’. I had to read all of it. They push me along and are always there to guide me,” he said. (Supplied: Arena Media)
He was at home in Warmun when the news came through he had been selected for one of the leading roles in The Warriors.”They sent me a big piece of paper for me to read. The WarriorsThe comedy drama TV series follows the once-great Warriors AFL club touching on identity, belonging, success, failure and fameStars John Howard, Lisa McCune and Vince ColosimoProduced by Tony Briggs (The Sapphires) and Robert Connolly (The Slap, Barracuda)
At the time, his former boarding house parent Linda Foster saw a national casting call for young Indigenous men to play a role in the upcoming ABC TV comedy drama The Warriors.The series is set in Melbourne and explores the elite world of professional Australian Rules Football through the eyes of two new recruits plucked from obscurity to fame and fortune.Linda thought Gordon would be perfect for the role and sought him out at the AFL match to ask if he would like to do an audition.”She asked me if I would love to try it and I said ‘yeah’. Gordon Churchill was watching a local footy match in Broome when a life changing opportunity presented itself.
(Supplied: Arena Media) Photo:
The Warriors: (L-R) Ben Knight (Scottie), Gordon Churchill (Maki), Reece Milne (Doc) and Nelson Baker (Zane).

Back Roads

By

Kelly Williams

Posted

April 12, 2017 06:00:00

Video: Gordon Churchill hopes his new TV role will put his WA hometown of Warmun on the map

(ABC News)

'The Warriors' starring Gordon Churchill

#TheRoadBackHome Every month we hitch a ride with an ABC personality as they reveal the stories that take them back to their community.

(Supplied: Ben Broadwith) Photo:
Gordon Churchill plays for the Warmun Eagles and points to a rainbow above their home ground in Warmun, Western Australia.

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The Warriors Preview

(Supplied: Ben Broadwith) Photo:
Gordon Churchill says Turkey Creek is his favourite place in his hometown of Warmun, WA.

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Gordon Churchill behind the scenes with The Warriors cast. (Supplied: Arena Media)

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Lisa McCune plays the team’s communications manager and Gordon Churchill plays the team’s number-one draft pick. (Supplied: Arena Media)

Singing for those on the cusp of death

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Melbourne 3000
Let's talk about death

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The Threshold Choir sings for people on the cusp of death, hoping to alleviate some of their anxieties around dying.The concept of a Threshold Choir first began in America in 2000; a book of ‘comfort’ songs were written and local chapters formed. Do you find comfort in music?
Listen to the full program

(Life Matters)
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(ABC News) ABC Radio Melbourne

By

Fiona Pepper

Updated

April 11, 2017 15:46:02

Video: The Melbourne Threshold Choir visits the Sunshine Hospital.
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Lisa and Will are by far the youngest members of the Threshold Choir. She enjoys listening to the choir from her bed. Photo:
The choir rehearses before singing for patients at the Sunshine Hospital. Lisa said she was drawn to the group after the death of her mother. Photo:
As the choir members made their way to ICU, they explained that they never know what they’re walking in to. (ABC Radio Melbourne: Fiona Pepper)
“My mother actually passed away from cancer last April and we spent the last two months in a palliative care unit,” she said.”Whilst we were there I felt there was a real need for music and singing and for a choir and so I started looking around on the internet to find a choir … Now there are more than 130 choirs worldwide.The choirs sing for patients in palliative care facilities and intensive care units, filling hospital corridors or patients’ rooms with their voices.The Melbourne chapterOn a Wednesday night in March, the Melbourne Threshold Choir met at Sunshine Hospital in the city’s north-west; they do this every month. (ABC Radio Melbourne: Fiona Pepper)
Warming up in a hospital function room, the choir of seven or so members, made up of mainly middle-aged men and women, rehearse their sombre repertoire of choral songs which they will later sing for patients.Jenny Batten, the music director of the Melbourne Threshold Choir, has led the group for the last three years and said it was a privilege to offer comfort in the form of song to very sick patients.”This choir is not about performance, it’s not about ego, it’s not about us as individuals; it’s about us as a group coming together with the sole purpose and the one intention of providing a soft, gentle, soothing sound in our singing to patients,” Ms Batten said.The choir visits in the evening before visiting hours close.Ms Batten said she believed the sounds of the choir allowed patients to rest and relax following a busy day of treatment.”I think we are able to hold a space for them, to help them rest into the evening,” she said.And it is not just the patients that find comfort in the singing, Ms Batten said. (ABC Radio Melbourne: Fiona Pepper)
“We’ve had lots of positive feedback from family members — because it’s of comfort not just to the patients, it’s also the family that we sing to,” she said.Singing for a patient on the thresholdMs Batten recalled one evening while singing at Sunshine’s ICU when a patient passed away.”We were singing near a closed curtain and we were unaware of what was going on behind the curtain and we were about to stop and a staff member came out and said to us, ‘please don’t stop, keep doing what you are doing, the patient behind this curtain is actually dying’,” she said.”And we kept singing and holding the space and being totally present to that moment and then we heard the cries of lament from the relatives and we knew then that that person had passed away.”The spiritual connectionMark Bradford works as a physiotherapist and is a member of the Threshold Choir.He said he was drawn to the spiritual side of the choir.”This is the real core of people’s life and death, so it’s being present to that aspect,” he said.”And it might be uncomfortable and ugly and there might be pain and difficulty, so being able to be present and to see if I can share with the rest of the choir, it’s a real connecting experience.”The patientsKapila Devi is 50 years old, and was recently diagnosed with liver cancer.As a patient of the Sunshine Hospital palliative care unit, she warmly invited the choir into her room. Photo:
50-year-old Kapila Devi was diagnosed with liver cancer last September. and I found the Threshold Choir.” (ABC Radio Melbourne: Fiona Pepper)
Laying back in her bed as the choir sung in the background, Ms Devi explained that she used to work as a chef but had to give it up after falling ill.”I’m here because I have cancer and it’s in my liver and this is the fourth stage I’m going through, but I’m happy with it because I’ve got all the happiness in my life,” Ms Devi said.She spoke very fondly of her family; she is a new grandmother who hopes to head home and spend time with her seven-month-old grandchild.She said of her husband at her side, “without him, I can’t go through this journey”.And while Ms Devi said she was never a good singer, she said she has always loved music.”It relaxes you, after all day and whatever you’ve gone through, the pain and stuff, it makes you forget all that,” she said.As the choir makes it way to ICU, Lisa Martin — who is in her 20s and is easily the youngest choir member — explained why she joined the group.

Hundreds of chickens on death row rehomed using Facebook

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Mullumbimby 2482
Pet turtle reunited with owner after marathon adventure
It’s been one of the most heart-warming experiences I’ve had.”

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Ms O’Shea says it is a commercial reality that chickens in the egg industry are culled at 18 months of age. (ABC News: Ruby Cornish)
An ongoing operationMs O’Shea said the rescue operation had left her with a waiting list of people in the region looking to rescue chickens, and she planned to make it an ongoing project.”This could be a way to connect egg farmers with people who can look after their old chickens,” she said.”They can’t be used for meat … They are still laying some eggs, but it’s a commercial reality that by the age of 18 months, all commercial farmers will cull their hens.”She said her priority was rescues from battery cages.”Those hens have lived their whole life in a small space and have never been able to walk in soil,” she said.”They’re the ones I really want to save.” A woman in regional NSW has managed to find homes for hundreds of chickens due to be culled over the weekend, using Facebook.When Julie O’Shea visited Ross Sigley’s organic farm in the NSW Northern Rivers town of Billinudgel, she only planned to walk away with 10 hens.Instead, she ended up with nearly 400.”It was purely by accident,” Ms O’Shea said.”When I asked Ross what was happening to the rest of them, he said he had to cull them because they were two years old and weren’t laying as much.”I said I’d put a message on Facebook to see if a few friends would take some.”Within hours, Ms O’Shea had been inundated with messages from people keen to take the chooks off her hands.Online plea goes viral

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Ross Sigley says he was relieved to see his chickens moving on to happy homes. It turned what would have been an unhappy weekend into a really happy one,” he said.”Those chickens would have gone into fertiliser or something else and that’s not something I like being involved in, really.”Flooding conjures community spiritMs O’Shea said recent flooding in northern NSW may have stirred something in people that made them inclined to help.”I think this story hit a nerve with people … There were people in Burringbar who lost whole flocks of chickens,” she said.”In times like these communities become amazingly strong and caring.”It’s made people step up and want to help. (Supplied: Julie O’Shea)
Ms O’Shea said her plea was seen by about 7,000 people, and it took less than two days for her to find homes for the hens.”I organised a vetting system because I was concerned that people would get them for free and try to on-sell them, or take them for their pet snakes or dog baiting,” she said.”They had to post a picture of their chicken coop and the area the hens would be.”She met with each of the rescuers as they came past the farm.”One lady wanted a little white hen for a disabled boy she works with,” Ms O’Shea said.”She looks after him and the only book he can read is Hattie the Hen.”Mr Sigley said it had been a big relief to see the chickens avoiding being sent off to slaughter.”It’s been great.

ABC North Coast

By

Ruby Cornish

Posted

April 11, 2017 15:39:34

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Julie O’Shea (L), with her friend Elke Meyer, managed to rehome nearly 400 chickens in less than two days. (Supplied: Julie O’Shea)

Student with paraplegia walks across stage at graduation with help of robotic skeleton

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University of Canberra 2617
A Canberra university graduate who lost the use of his legs 11 years ago has walked across the stage to accept his degree, with the help of a robotic exoskeleton.Paul Jenkins was left with paraplegia after a motorcycle accident in 2006, but has been regaining control of his legs through a mix of stem cell therapy, physiotherapy and training in the use of the exoskeleton, known as the ReWalk.To keep his mind active during intense physiotherapy, Mr Jenkins began studying commerce and applied economics at the University of Canberra.”It’s taken a lot – I had to learn to crawl again, had to learn to kneel again, learn to balance,” he said.”I thought ‘you’ve still got to keep your brain working while you’re going through this process’, so I just enrolled in a few units and here I am.”

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Paul Jenkins graduated along with hundreds of other students at Parliament House today. (ABC News: Ian Cutmore)
While crossing the stage on his own two feet was an emotional moment for Mr Jenkins, he said the idea started as a joke.”This was a joke that I was called on – I had no intention to do this and then I said it as a joke, and now here I am,” he said. every time I get out of it is a bonus.”I can feel the differences, I know when I’m on marble, carpet, sand, grass.”While the device is still in its early days, Jim Barrett from ReWalk’s Australian distributor Making Strides said he hoped the device could one day replace the wheelchair.”There’s a lot of medical benefits, so bone density increase, in muscle mass, decrease in fat mass,” he said.”A lot of quality-of-life markers as well will improve like sleep and fatigue, and even just social interaction factors as well.”

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Paul Jenkins hopes to one day be able to walk without the help of the device. (ABC News: Ian Cutmore)
The ReWalk uses motorised hip and knee motions to allow the wearer to walk.”It’s basically Forrest Gump meets an iPad,” Mr Jenkins said.”I hate the chair …
Updated

April 11, 2017 18:21:07

Video: Paraplegic Paul Jenkins walks on stage to accept degree using wearable robotic exoskeleton

(ABC News)