Traum – Ufo 361 feat. Namika songtexte

Songtexte Ufo 361 – Traum
Ja ich mache jetzt alles selbst
Brauche kein’ mehr, der mir hilft
Ja ich acker, ja ich acker schnell, ja ja
Bis ich alles hab’, was ich will
Ja, sie haten jetzt mein’ Lifestyle
Ihr habt es nicht verdient, nein nein
Ich erfinde mich jetzt wieder neu, nein nein
Finde keinen, der mich überzeugt, nein nein(traum)
Deutscher Rap ist mein Groupie, mein Groupie
Deutscher Rap ist mein Groupie, mein Groupie
Mama, sagte: Kind, der Druck mag dich prägen
Auch wenn die Sonne nicht scheint
Jede Blume brauch Regennn. Wenn alle plötzlich nicken und grinsen
Mit wem kann man dann wirklich noch reden? Ja ich sorg’ jetzt für Aufseh’n
Zieh es durch, bis ich drauf geh’
Bis ich irgendwann mein’ Traum leb’
Nein, nein ich höre nicht auf
Versuri-lyrics.info
Nein ich höre nicht auf
Nein, nein, nein, nein
Nein, nein, nein, nein. Ufo361 songtexte
Video Ufo361

Szeress ujra – Igni dalszoveg

Dalszoveg Igni – Szeress ujra
Baby, hamis almokat kergettel
O barcsak ertenem
Mindig ugy vigyaztam rad
De te csunyan becsaptal.(szeress ujra)
Szivem torted szet
De nelkuled meghalnek
olelj ugy mint reg
Legyen minden alomszep. (x2)
Baby, olyan szep vagy nincs ra szo
Veled ebren almodom
Versuri-lyrics.info
De a mult most is faj
Az atvirrasztott ejszakak. Szeress ujraaa,szeress ujraa
Mi lesz senki se tudja
Nalad a szivem kulcsa
Mert nem kell senki mas.
Szivem torted szet
De nelkuled meghalnek
olelj ugy mint reg
Legyen minden alomszep. (x2)
Szeress ujraaa! Szeress ujraaa,szeress ujraaa
Mi lesz senki se tudja
Nalad a szivem kulcsa
Mert nem kell senki mas. Szeress ujraaa,szeress ujraaa
Mi lesz senki se tudja
Nalad a szivem kulcsa
Mert nem kell senki mas. IGNI dalszovegek
Video ujra (x2)
Kerlek baby kezdjuk ujra
Hogy kesőbb mi lesz senki se tudja
Mert nalad a szivem kulcsa
Szeress ujraaa!

You got me – SNBRN feat. Blu Jlyrics

I think about the times you touch me, hands all on my body
Maybe you should know
I think about the way you kiss me
Why you such a mystery
Every time you call
You got meee thinking about you, you
You got meee thinking about you
You got meee thinking about you, you
You got meee thinking about you. (x7) You got me thinking about you, you. Lyrics SNBRN – You got me
I feel your ghost when I’m all alone
It’s like I’m caught in a wishing well, wishing well, wishing well
You’re a crack in my heart is stone, feeling, they start to grow
Baby, I fall for you.(you got me)
I crave your skin
I can’t give in
Don’t let it show.
You got me thinking about youuu. (x19)
SNBRN lyrics
Video me I crave your skin
I can’t give in
Don’t let it show. I feel my arm is wearing thin
It’s like I’m lost in your shadow (shadow, shadow)
Let me stop by and let it go versuri-lyrics.info
If only I let you know the feelings I have for you. I think about the times you touch me, hands all on my body
Maybe you should know
I think about the way you kiss me
Why you such a mystery
Every time you call
You got meee thinking about you, you
You got meee thinking about you
You got meee thinking about you, you
You got meee thinking about you
You got meee thinking about you
You got meee thinking about you
You got meee thinking about you.

Show me the way – Inna feat. Marco & Seba lyrics

Inna lyrics
Video the way Transcribing.. Baby show me the waaay you do
When you lift me up and down, lift me up and down,
Sing for you, I’ll be anything you likeee.
Lyrics Inna – Show me the way
I got a feeling you want me to come right now. And I can tell that you’re ready cause you always come right down
I need a kiss from your lips and you’re wasting my hands
And you can talk with your body and you know I understand. (Show me the way)
Baby show me the way to you
Let me come and show you mine, come and show you mine
Versuri-lyrics.info
Stay and I do anything you like.

Singers wanted for choir to beat Parkinson’s

Singing for those on the cusp of death
(Facebook: Canterbury Cantata Trust)
Research fellow Yoon Irons, who is also a music therapist, told ABC Radio Brisbane’s Craig Zonca the singing groups in the UK were growing every year.”I’m a singer and I believe in singing as it can be a medicine and it can change lives,” Dr Irons said.Two choirs, one aimThe program needs participants in Brisbane to form two choirs; one that will meet at North Lakes, north of Brisbane, and the other at the Conservatorium at South Bank.Twenty members are needed for each choir and they will be expected to sing for one hour per week for six months.Researchers will measure and investigate any changes that take place in the participants over that time. Could singing be the best medicine in the fight against Parkinson’s disease?The Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre is going to put this question to the test as part of its Sing to Beat Parkinson’s program.The Australian-first study encourages program participants diagnosed with Parkinson’s to sing on a weekly basis as part of a group.Irene Bartlett from Griffith University said they would study each of the participants’ lives closely to see what benefits came from singing.”We’re wanting to get empirical evidence that singing is helpful and useful for quality of life,” Dr Bartlett said.The concept was originally developed in Britain by the Canterbury Cantata Trust. “We need people with Parkinson’s and their carers as we feel we need to bring joy to the whole community,” Dr Bartlett said.”There will be movement and we’ll also do breath connection exercises, as many patients suffer from weaker voice production.”Participants will also be able to supply their own songs for the choir to learn.”We’ll make sure that they are singing songs that they enjoy, as we want to build that sense of community, as people can become isolated with Parkinson’s,” Dr Bartlett said.”The novelty is that participants can choose the songs they want to sing and can share memories that they have with that song.”Interested participants should contact the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre on (07) 3735 6335. Photo:
Members of the choir can be joined by their carers during the research.
Related Story:
Map:
Brisbane 4000
ABC Radio Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Updated

April 20, 2017 12:25:44

Photo:
Researchers hope to prove that singing can help with Parkinson’s disease. (Facebook: Canterbury Cantata Trust)

How Tanzanian midwives can deliver up to 30 babies per shift

Delivering babies in a war zone
Related Story:
Complex truth of pregnancy remains shrouded in taboos
ABC Goldfields

By

Jarrod Lucas

Posted

April 21, 2017 09:36:32
Related Story:
Related Story:
Photo:
Kalgoorlie’s Marg Crane with counterparts (L-R) Hilda, Johari, Chiku and newborn Ari Ducrou. (ABC Goldfields-Esperance: Jarrod Lucas)
Why do so many women feel guilty for getting epidurals?
Map:
Kalgoorlie 6430
“Here in Australia they give anti-pain and we don’t know why.”Kalgoorlie midwife Marg Crane, who took the Tanzanian trio under her wing during their visit, said Western societies want “a quick fix”. Tokophobia: The women too petrified to push Tokophobia causes a fear of childbirth so intense women may seek abortions, elective C-sections, or avoid pregnancy altogether. Reminder of ‘how lucky we are’The program provides experience for the midwives to return home as role models to train their colleagues. But here they are not allowed.”A significant difference between cultures is that Tanzanian mothers are not given the option of painkillers during labour.”In our country we don’t give anti-pain (medication) such as an epidural,” Ms Hamisi said.”If we have 12 to 20 women in labour they are very noisy … Ms Crane said their visit was also valuable to Australia’s health workers, adding that she has seen the “very highs and lows” during a career spanning 25 years.”I have not been involved in any maternal deaths and that would probably be the worst-case scenario that any midwife would see,” she said.”We do see women at the worst time of their lives when they lose a child, but we also see them on the happiest days of their life when they have a healthy baby.”Wherever you work in the world as a midwife that’s the most joyous thing that you can do — present that mum and family with a healthy child.”Places like Tanzania and other countries throughout the world don’t have the facilities we have, so we have to stand back and realise how lucky we are.” it depends on the season.”Last year we conducted 11,000 (deliveries at my hospital).”

Photo:
WA Country Health Service Goldfields regional director Geraldine Ennis (far right) with the visiting midwives. “(It can be) up to 30 … The truth about pregnancy Pregnancy continues to be portrayed through rosy lenses, while the true, sometimes nightmarish side of it remains hidden away. Photo:
The visiting midwives from Tanzania on the maternity ward at Kalgoorlie Health Campus. too many to count,” she said. “The moment they brought her to our hospital she was very seriously ill and we tried our level best to save her life, but we couldn’t manage and she died.”It was so sad because life is precious.”Chiku Hamisi said Tanzanian midwives are given more responsibility due to a lack of doctors. One day I witnessed a mother who died from PPH (postpartum haemorrhage) — that is bleeding after delivery — I was so sad.”That happened because of shortage of staff.”When a mother starts to bleed you know that it is an emergency and nurses should work as a team to control that bleeding. “In our country two midwives can deliver 15 to 20 babies in an eight-hour shift. screaming in pain. (ABC Goldfields-Esperance: Jarrod Lucas)
“Lots of people who are having babies don’t want any pain so they ask for epidurals and we have the facility to offer that,” she said.”There are women who come in and they don’t want any pain relief at all, so we try to be guided here by the women to respect what they want and what their family want for their birth.”The Tanzanian midwives visited as contributors to Global Health Alliance Western Australia, a partnership which has provided professional development for nurses and midwives in Tanzania for the past six years.The Department of Health’s initiative is supported by the African nation’s Ministry for Health and sponsored by Rotary, including the Hannans, Kalgoorlie and Boulder clubs. About TanzaniaKnown for Mt Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, as well as national parks filled with elephants, lions and zebrasBordered by Kenya and Uganda to the north; Rwanda, Burundi and DR Congo to the west; Zambia, Mowali and Mozambique to the south and the Indian Ocean to the eastPopulation estimated at 55 million people by the UN in 2015, more than double Australia’s populationPopulation growing on average 3.2 per cent per yearAverage life expectancy is 65.6 for females and 62.6 for men in Tanzania, nearly 20 years less than Australians can expect to live
“They (Australian midwives) are not as busy because I think the population is not as big compared to us,” she said.”I have had a lot of difficult cases. “Sometimes we don’t have the equipment, doctors, sometimes you have no doctors,” she said.”(Midwives in Australia) deliver and give the baby to the paediatrician to see what is going on.”During labour if there are any complications — to shorten the second stage of labour — we do vacuum extractions. The United Nations has called Africa’s population the fastest-growing on the planet, and it is not hard to see why.Three African midwives from the United Republic of Tanzania have just spent three weeks in Western Australia as part of a Department of Health study tour.Their trip included training in regional areas, including the Kalgoorlie Health Campus, where in a typical week midwives would welcome about a dozen newborns into the world.But that is child’s play for Tanzanian women Johari Kishegena, Hilda Kweka and Chiku Hamisi, whose combined experience as midwives nudges nearly 50 years.Ms Kishegena has been a midwife for 24 years and lost count years ago when the ABC asked how many deliveries she had been involved in.”Many, many … (ABC Goldfields-Esperance: Jarrod Lucas)
Midwives take the lead Hilda Kweka said she had noticed the vast differences in tempo on Australian maternity wards during her visit.