Build your digital literacy skills at the local library

Collecting memories of the Brooker Highway
ABC Radio Hobart

By

Carol Rääbus

Posted

April 03, 2017 11:24:52

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Learning the inside workings of a computer is one of the courses on offer at Makerspace. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
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Students are given space and time to work out how the computers go together to get them working. trying to interpret the images because there’s not a lot of writing here.”I find that that’s an interesting way to construct something like this; I expected a big instruction manual with a lot of words in it.”I guess it’s all about trial and error and experimentation and that’s what computers are all about in my experience.”

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Amelia from the Tasmanian eSchool says learning to build a computer from scratch was fun. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
“It’s basically getting you to take a look at the insides of the computer,” Stella, one of the students, said of the course.”I’m just following the instructions … (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
“It’s really important to show people how a technology works and how they might use it in their own lives,” Anna Zylstra, information services coordinator at Glenorchy LINC, said.”The library is the perfect place for a Makerspace to be located because libraries have always traditionally been about learning and providing learning opportunities.”Classes at the Makerspace cover off on 3D printing, learning how to use virtual reality and how to code games and robots.”It’s really fantastic for the community of Glenorchy to have this project here,” Ms Zylstra said.”It’s one of the areas which does have the least access to technology and computers and the internet at home, so we were really pleased to be able to provide this to the community.” One of the courses on offer looks at how to build a computer, and students from the Tasmanian eSchool are taking part. Photo:
Once the computers are assembled, the next step is learning to code to control a game. Photo:
Anna Zylstra and Tim Polegaj see the Makerspace as a place where the community can learn and share new tech ideas. (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
Tim Polegaj, the community learning coordinator at Glenorchy LINC, said the courses were about letting people explore and play with technology in order to get familiar with it.”We develop programs that give people an opportunity to discover, learn and get hands-on,” he said.”We’ve had people from six to eight years old right through to 86 and 90 years old … (ABC Radio Hobart: Carol Rääbus) it’s open to everybody with learning opportunities to suit different needs.”It gives people an opportunity to explore how things work, why they work, and what they can do to get things moving and working in ways they may not have thought of.”Makerspace courses are mostly at an introductory level and no prior experience is needed to take part.Details can be found on its Facebook page. Knowing which wire does what inside your computer and how to code a virtual reality game are ever-increasingly important skills to have.And the Glenorchy LINC now boasts a new space to teach anyone and everyone how to do these — and more.The Makerspace room is equipped with a range of tech devices used in free classes aimed at helping people gain better digital literacy skills.
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Glenorchy 7010
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Residents rally together to clean up after the floods

In photos: Rockhampton on edge as flood-hit towns left reeling
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Fears for missing people amid cyclone, flood clean-up

the more it seems to come back.”But I’m trying to get new ovens and when we can we will get [the shop] up and running again.”Beenleigh mops upIn nearby Beenleigh, the historic Windaroo Cottage, which is a popular spot for weddings, was surrounded by water on Friday.Owner Wendy Child said the scenes had stayed with her ever since.”We went to bed thinking we were OK, but when we got up at 4:00am on Friday I just burst into tears,” she said.”I could only see a sea of water and I couldn’t see anything else.”
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Wendy Childs
She said the help from the local community had been overwhelming.”The wonderful people from the Stapleton Mosque have helped us non-stop,” Ms Child said.Matt O’Hanlon, principal of Beenleigh State High School, said his biggest worry during the flood event was keeping the school’s agricultural animals safe and dry. South-east Queenslanders are rolling up their sleeves to help those whose homes and businesses were inundated by floodwaters late last week.The famous Yatala Pie Shop, built in 1871, was among dozens of properties swamped south of Brisbane. (ABC Radio Brisbane: Terri Begley)
Tom said the next few days would involve cleaning and stocktaking what possessions they had left.”Until the mud dries out … External Link:

Yatala Pies
“At no stage did we think that the water would enter the shop.”The fast-thinking boys used flour bags to ‘flour bag’ the building but it wasn’t enough.”Staff and volunteers are now on site helping demolish internal walls that have been damaged by the water.”We’ve lost ovens and cold rooms, but we’re doing OK and everyone has been fantastic,” Ms Porter said.”The more we clean though … we can’t do much at all,” he said.”If we got a shower of rain with 10 to 15mm that would be really good to wash away some of this mud.” we didn’t need to get the animals on desks, which would have been hard to do. Photo:
During and after the floods at Beenleigh State High School. Photo:
Yatala’s famous pie shop is less than a kilometre from the Albert River. (Supplied: Nine News)
It remains closed today as the extensive clean-up continues.General manager Susan Porter has owned the shop for three decades and said the water came quicker than they could have ever imagined.”On Friday morning we had bakers starting at 3:00am making pies and had truck deliveries at 5:30am,” she told ABC Radio Brisbane’s Steve Austin.”When they went for a break at 6:30am they saw the water had come up and we were stranded. (ABC Radio Brisbane: Terri Begley)
“We had to get them up to higher ground,” he said.”We got them up though … “It was a bonus we weren’t at school on Friday as the waters rose so quickly and it would have been a disaster.”‘We could only see water’North Maclean residents Tom and Lisa saw 25 acres of their 26-acre property go under water.”We could only see water, water and more water,” Lisa said.”We didn’t get everything out but we have more than what other people have.”

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Residents flooded in the Eagleby and North Maclean areas push flood-damaged contents onto the footpath.
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Beenleigh 4207
ABC Radio Brisbane

By Terri Begley, Rachel Fountain and Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

April 03, 2017 13:31:05

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Tom and Lisa from North Maclean say they can’t do much until the mud dries out. (ABC Radio Brisbane: Rachel Fountain)
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Ringbalin shares Indigenous concern for environment

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Goolwa 5214
By Michael Coggan

Posted

April 03, 2017 16:40:53

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Major Sumner performing for the Goolwa audience at Ringbalin. (ABC News: Michael Coggan)
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The need to care for the environment is a message passed down by each generation to the next. (ABC News: Michael Coggan)
Laurance Magick Dennis travelled to Goolwa in South Australia from Walgett in New South Wales with dance group Milan Dhiiyaan.He said that over half a century he had seen significant changes to the Barwon and Namoi rivers, close to Walgett.”As a kid I used to be able to go down to the river and stick my head in and it was just like getting a fresh drink of water out of a rainwater tank, but now you wouldn’t be game enough to do it — you’d end up with diarrhoea or something,” he said.Joseph Dixon, from the River Boys dance group from Bourke, told the Goolwa audience he was taking part in the ringbalin because he wanted it to build support for caring for the river system.”Every single one of us is affected by what’s been put in the river upstream,” he said. our children learn that.”

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Dance groups from across the river system share cultural and environmental messages. On a sandy dance floor at the mouth of the Murray, warmed by a circle of fires, Aboriginal groups have staged a ringbalin, the culmination of a week of ceremonies along the Murray-Darling river system.Ringbalin, a Ngarrindjeri word for ceremony, involves sharing stories of Indigenous culture and staging healing ceremonies for the waterways.”It’s about the spirit of this land, it’s about the spirit of the river and the stories that we tell our children,” Ngarrindjeri elder Major Sumner explained.”[They are] stories that need to be passed on — about the river, about creation of the land that we live in.”About 30 Ngarrindjeri dancers and supporters were joined by the members of other Indigenous dance groups as they visited Brewarrina, Bourke, Mount Gundabooka, Wilcannia, Menindee, Mildura, Wentworth, Renmark and Murray Bridge. (ABC News: Michael Coggan) Photo:
Performers take to a sand stage, before an appreciative audience which is keen to share in Indigenous culture. We learn that … (ABC News: Michael Coggan)
River system a trickle upstreamDespite some heavy rainfall boosting flows in recent months, Major Sumner said he was worried about how the river system was being managed in the longer term.”At Wilcannia, you can jump across the river, you can just take one step and jump, you don’t even need to run up,” he said.”These waterways are our lifeblood — we’ve got a word for all the animals, ngatji, [it] means friend [and] if we don’t look after the water in the river our friends will die — when they die we die.”The ringbalin journey has given the wider community a chance to learn about Indigenous culture, Major Sumner said.”They want to learn our stories, our dances, our creation stories, everything about this land that they don’t know,” he said.He said the swan egg dance was a favourite of his, a performance based on stories passed down from elders about not taking all the eggs.”That’s something that we learnt, never to be greedy.

‘Everything’s covered in dust’: Talented young sculptors create public art

(ABC Radio Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
Sculptures destined for various Hills sitesMr Apponyi said the artworks were destined for various Hills locations once completed and some remained available for sponsorship.”These sculptures are able to go into business premises — one’s going to Longview Winery,” he said.”They can’t end up in someone’s backyard because the whole purpose of the event is to give them exposure in a public place.”Over nine days until next Sunday, the artists will be hard at work and the public can watch their creations as they develop.”We’ve got 75 tonnes of marble and granite and only nine days,” Mr Apponyi said.”[Spectators can] sit there with a deck chair and just be totally amazed, with the whole process in front of you.”Drilling, splitting [stone], cutting flat [base] surfaces so they’ll stand upright, cutting curves in stone, hammering, chiselling, shaping, the whole box and dice.”Among the sculptors taking part is John Nelson, who worked in bronze when he created the work Foreign Policy to win a past Waterhouse Natural History Art Prize. Photo:
Silvio Apponyi enjoys being a mentor to emerging sculptors. (Supplied: National Archives of Australia) Photo:
John Nelson worked in bronze to win the Waterhouse Art Prize in 2006. Tonnes of granite and marble are being transformed into public artworks by talented young sculptors working at a site in the Adelaide Hills.An organiser of the Sculptors @ Crystal Lake event at Macclesfield, Silvio Apponyi, has been creating art for more than four decades and now enjoys mentoring a young generation of sculptors, while still creating his own works.”Everything’s covered in dust, but progressing well,” he said, as the event got underway.”This year we’ve got six young emerging sculptors, so we’re giving them a chance to have a public work in a public place in the Adelaide Hills.”Mr Apponyi said the emerging artists assisted international sculptors who visited South Australia when three major sculpture events were held in the Adelaide Hills over recent years.”Rather than calling them assistants, I’m now calling them emerging sculptors because they’re actually well and truly capable of producing large works,” he said.
Sculptors chip away at Adelaide Hills artworks
(Supplied: Sculptors @ Crystal Lake) ABC Radio Adelaide

Posted

April 02, 2017 11:36:39

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In the shadow of a past creation, sculptors are busy on new granite and marble works.
Emerging sculptors carve out their futures in stone at Macclesfield
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Macclesfield 5153

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What I learnt on an Aboriginal cultural tour

and it’s also antibacterial.” Cauliflower plant ‘a bush band-aid’ We came across a white flowering plant found all around Canberra.”We would use cauliflower plant in smoking ceremonies; you put that on the fire to get rid of bad spirits,” he said. I’ve walked Canberra’s Mount Majura dozens of times; I’ve admired the tall gums, heard the crunching of rocks underfoot and soaked up the beautiful views from the top.I took in the natural beauty of the place, but I never realised the history stretching back tens of thousands of years that was right under my nose.It wasn’t until I joined a cultural tour of the nature reserve with Ngunnawal elder and traditional custodian Tyronne Bell that I was able to see the landscape through different eyes.”This area is a recorded Aboriginal site,” Mr Bell explained as he pointed out a flat open space near a dry creek at the base of the mountain.”My ancestors have been here 60,000 years plus, so there would have been water flowing down there.”This area is nice and flat and you could see people coming; those days were really fierce and you had to see who was coming, as we had a lot of warfare against other clans.”

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Tyronne Bell points out an Aboriginal scar tree. “We never had shops, we couldn’t just go down to the corner store or the mall to buy everything, we had to make everything to survive.” Scar trees pointing the way Up ahead was a tall gum tree with a white trunk and markings up high.”You have a lot of different Aboriginal scars around Canberra,” Mr Bell said.”This one here is pointing down to that big [flat] site at the start. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
“Some of the elders said it was good for your skin, for ageing … Termite mounds over a metre high were used as Aboriginal burial sites. “If you’re out on country and you cut yourself and you don’t have a band-aid, you use it.”You roll it all up and it becomes all sticky and that and you put it on the wound; it’s a bush band-aid.”

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Sunita White smells a piece of cauliflower bush during the tour. He pulled off a piece of the grass, put it to his lips and made a high-pitched sound. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
Basket weaving and snake whistles Closer to the ground, we inspected a bunch of dianella grass.”Some people may already have it in their gardens; you can use it for basket weaving,” Mr Bell said. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
‘Old man beard’ headache remedyA vine climbing along a tree branch had created a mass that looked like a wispy white beard.”Old man beard, these leaves here you squash them up, put them in water, boil it, smell it, it’s good for migraine headaches,” Mr Bell said. “Soap bush — we would use this when you’re out on country and you want to spruce up for the other half,” he said with a chuckle. “Back in the day a lot of trees were used as marker trees, just like traffic lights and signage that say you have to go this way.”Keeping clean in the bushMr Bell pulled some leaves off a low bush, poured some water on them and started rubbing them between his hands.To everyone’s surprise, it started to lather up like soap. Photo:
Canberra man Thomas Townson inspects an ‘old man beard’ vine as part of the tour of Mount Majura. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
Termite mounds and burial sites A bit further along the track we found a termite mound, and while it was only a small one, we soon discovered what the big towers of earth were once used for.”Around our country the rock is really, really hard and the ground is hard,” Mr Bell said.”So back in the day our ancestors would cut the lid off, dig down and put the Aboriginal body inside and fold them up.”Then we’d put dirt back over and then put the rocks over so the wildlife wouldn’t come and pull the body out.”

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A small termite mound on Mount Majura. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
He picked up a round rock: “This one here is a hammer stone.”It turned out many of the small rocks and stones we were walking over were actually artefacts.”A lot of them are considered by archaeologists as rubbish or no good, but sometimes, depending on where you were, you had to use what was available to you,” Mr Bell explained. Photo:
Tyronne Bell lathers up some ‘soap bush’.
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Ngunnawal elder Tyronne Bell blowing a snake whistle

'The entire country is sacred': Indigenous sites in the ACT
Snotty gobbles: Discovering bush tucker and native mistletoe
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(ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers) ABC Radio Canberra

By

Penny Travers

Posted

April 01, 2017 09:00:00

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Ngunnawal elder Tyronne Bell holds up one of the many stone artefacts that can be found on Mount Majura.
“It was also used as a whistle to bring snakes in. “But if you get lost and they’re out in season and you get lost, you can have a good munch.”The sap was used to treat snake bite — I haven’t tried it on anyone yet!”

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Gaye Paterson from Melbourne takes a photo of a small kurrajong tree. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
Embracing Ngunnawal cultureMr Bell set up Dharwra Aboriginal Cultural Tours six months ago to offer a variety of guided tours around the national capital.”It’s about people looking outside their door or their window and experiencing and embracing local Aboriginal Ngunnawal culture,” he said.”It’s about educating the wider community, but also we come across Aboriginal people that have been disconnected from their culture and we also help them out too.”

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A highlight was admiring the view while listening to 18-year-old Jayden Goodrem play the didgeridoo. the seeds in there, you can actually cook them up and have it as traditional popcorn,” he said.Next was a native cherry.”You eat the red, yellow part but not the other bit because the other bit will make you sick,” he said. “I’ve actually tried it on a snake and it actually does come in because it sounds like an injured bird that’s fallen out of the nest because it’s at that vibration.”Bush tucker “For Aboriginal people, back in the day, everything out here was our supermarket to use, it was all about protein and surviving,” Mr Bell said.He pointed out a kurrajong tree.”The little shell that they have looks like a bird … (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)