Million-dollar donation revives dream for the ‘Heart Bus’

(ABC News) Australian Story

By Megan Mackander and Kristine Taylor

Updated

May 29, 2017 20:30:20

Video: Dr Gomes is planning a second Heart Bus to visit at least five more rural towns.
A family member told Australian Story they were inspired to donate after hearing Dr Gomes speak at an event last year.The donation was in memory of their late father who also had a love for the bush and believed doctors were vital to the survival of country towns.”They told me their father had also wanted to try and get doctors out into the bush,” Dr Gomes said.”He’d spent years trying to create a program but ran into brick walls.”Almost 3,000 people have been through the doors of the “Heart Bus”, as itis known by local communities, since launching in October 2014.Wheels in motion for second truckPlans are now on the drawing board for a second truck which will enable Dr Gomes to widen the scope of services on offer beyond heart health. It’s going to get bigger, it’s going to get more expansive, and it can’t be ignored,” he said. A million-dollar mystery donation will help a mobile heart clinic roll into more rural towns, bringing specialist doctors and lifesaving expertise to the bush. It’s a lack of specialists.”Heart Bus made a ‘big difference’

Photo:
Jimmy Smith from Winton in western Queensland with his grandson Aaron on the family property. (Supplied)
The blueprints include consulting rooms for a gastroenterologist, urologist and endocrinologist, and a surgery for minor operations.The second clinic is set to launch in January 2018 and will add another five towns to its Queensland route and possibly head interstate.Dr Gomes estimated it would cost $1 million to build the truck and $1 million a year to run the program.The six-figure donation came after an application to partner with the Queensland Government was rejected last year.Dr Gomes said he was disappointed the Government could not see value in supporting the program long-term.”Why wouldn’t the Government be more interested? Photo:
Dr Gomes says it costs $1 million to build a new cardiology clinic. (Australian Story: Anthony Sines)
City-country health care inequalityDr Gomes realised there was a city-country divide in health care when he was a trainee doctor on rural rotations in western Queensland.People living in the country are 44 per cent more likely to die of heart disease than people living in the city, and in some remote areas the figure can rise as high as 63 per cent, according to the National Heart Foundation.”You can’t look at the gap and say the way to address that is to maintain the status quo, because whatever already exists, clearly we need to be doing more,” he said.”We’re not talking about a lack of butchers, bakers, candlestick-makers. The donation was made by a family who wishes to remain anonymous. I lie in bed and I stare at the ceiling trying to work out reasons why,” Dr Gomes said.Public health programs ‘better value for money’In a statement to Australian Story, Queensland Health’s Dr John Wakefield said the Government did not routinely fund private specialist outreach services.”Private providers operate their businesses of their own accord under Medicare funding arrangements without ongoing State Government funding,” the deputy-director general of Clinical Excellence Division said.The State Government chipped in $250,000 to the Heart of Australia at its inception.Dr Wakefield said the current public health system provider model was “better value for money” and that it already offered public cardiology and endocrinology services to patients in rural Queensland.But Dr Gomes said there have never been any services similar to what the “Heart Bus” provided in rural Queensland.”The State Government says they can provide this system cheaper; the problem is they don’t, otherwise they would be there,” he said.”If there is a cheaper alternative I’d like to know what it is.”

Photo:
The Heart of Australia mobile cardiology clinic rolls into Dalby in Queensland. Key points:Second ‘Heart Bus’ set to hit the road by start of 2018 with variety of specialists on boardQueensland Government says public programs “better value for money”Almost 3,000 patients have been through the clinic across 12 towns
The Heart of Australia is a cardiology clinic which operates off the back of a truck.It is the brainchild of engineer-turned-cardiologist Dr Rolf Gomes, who equipped the 25-metre truck with all the specialist gear of a city practice.The semi-trailer blazes a trail through outback Queensland, travelling 8,000 kilometres each month visiting 12 regional towns.The Brisbane-based doctor said the million-dollar donation came out of the blue and would now allow him to put a second mobile clinic on the road to reach more people in more towns.”Not every day does someone offer you a million dollars to build your dream,” Dr Gomes said.”I nearly fell off the back of my chair.”
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The new Heart Bus will include consultation rooms and a surgery for minor operations. (ABC News: Blythe Moore)
Jimmy Smith runs cattle outside of Winton, which is a 16-hour drive from any Brisbane specialist.Mr Smith had not seen a cardiologist in 16 years since having a stent inserted.After a consultation at the “Heart Bus” he was referred to Brisbane for further testing.A blockage was discovered and is now controlled with medication and regular monitoring.Almost 12 months on, Mr Smith said he was “feeling pretty good”.”We are still in drought and it’s hard to get away,” he said.”Having it [the Heart Bus] right there on the doorstep has made a big difference to me.”Mr Gomes said it was his long-term plan to take the “Heart Bus” nationally.”The truth is the program is here to stay one way or the other.
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Meet Jimmy and Bob, two patients of the cardiology 'clinic on wheels'
Queensland rejects funding proposal for cardiology 'clinic on wheels'

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‘Don’t ask how astronauts go to toilet’: Adelaide cadets to hook up with space station

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ABC Radio Adelaide

Posted

May 29, 2017 07:00:22

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Adelaide air cadets are to speak with the space station crew for just the second time. (Twitter: Chris Hadfield)
We can talk about whatever else we want to talk about.”The link on Wednesday evening, between the aviation museum at Port Adelaide and the space station, will be precise in duration, Mr Lelliott said.”[The space station] will actually be over Santa Rosa in America, we’ll have 10 minutes and 38 seconds exactly,” he said.”We’re going to use what’s called a telebridge, which is like a speaker phone really.”A phone line is plugged into it, NASA will ring us at the museum, once that is established they will transfer our call to a ground station at Santa Rosa, they will convert the signal into radio and beam it up to the space station.”

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The space station astronauts will be over Santa Rosa in the US at the time of this week’s hook-up. When Australian Air League cadets get a rare chance to speak with the crew of the orbiting International Space Station this week, they will have a precise window of time for their conversation.Organiser Marc Lelliott said it was important they did not waste time with well-worn questions of the space adventurers.”The only thing NASA says is to get the cadets not to ask how the astronauts go to the toilet,” he laughed.”Apparently that’s one of the more common ones. (Twitter: Chris Hadfield)
Questions culled to final listCadets across Adelaide submitted potential questions, they were judged and culled into a final list and this was formally submitted, to give the astronauts and cosmonauts a chance to prepare answers and make best use of the window of time.Mr Lelliott said the hook-up would be truly international.”You’ve got 20 Australian cadets, a French astronaut who will be in the Russian segment of the space station, in orbit over America,” he said.Cadets also spoke with the space station team back in 2014.”That worked reasonably well, the antenna they used on the station was partially covered by a solar panel so the signal wasn’t perfect,” Mr Lelliott said.”But it was good enough to hear the astronaut and he was able to hear the cadets.”This week’s hook-up starts at 7:05pm ACST on Wednesday.
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Jean therapy: Making paper from recycled denim

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Sarah May Sadler sorts paper seed tiles into gardening packages for children. Paperworks is a not-for-profit social enterprise that uses the art of papermaking to engage marginalised people and those with special needs. External Link:

Paperworks: Making paper from denim
To do that, the denim is cut into 1.5cm x 1.5cm pieces (which takes about four hours of cutting), soaked overnight and then put in a Hollander beater for up to six hours. Photo:
Allyscha Thomson started making paper two years ago. “It literally shears the blocks of textile apart into a really stringy pulp, very soft to the touch, opaque,” Ms Pieterse said.”Then you use a mould and deckle to make a sheet of paper by dipping it into the vat of pulpy water … “It is entirely volunteer-based and we’re able to use the funds that come from that project to actually continue the recycling at Paperworks,” Ms Pieterse said.”We do have a longer-term vision though of being able to offer workplace opportunities there for students with special needs.”

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Susanna Pieterse says the Hollander beater literally shears the blocks of textile apart. “We’re really at the stage where we’d prefer people to buy the product to give us a reason to continue doing the recycling instead of donating more jeans,” Ms Pieterse said. “I like the feel of it [the pulp] when it’s in the water, and making paper from scratch is what I like to do,” she said. “We were using cardboard and recycled paper in the first few sessions but it was unforgiving and had lacklustre results,” chief executive Susanna Pieterse said. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
Allyscha Thomson, 24, started making paper two years ago after her former school teacher suggested the idea. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
The denim paper is crafted into cards, notebook covers and seed tiles.”We make paper leaves that are seeded with vegetables to encourage children to take an interest in healthy foods and eat what they grow,” Ms Pieterse said. “We started looking into using textiles and became aware of the great need to recycle textiles — more than 80 per cent of denim actually ends up in landfill.”We found the longer fibres of textiles helped the paper hold together better.”We now only use recycled textiles because recycled paper can go into mainstream recycling anyway.”How denim becomes paperTwo pairs of jeans can make about 40 sheets of paper. Photo:
It takes about a week for the pulp to dry. “We’re hoping that some schools will take this up as a fundraiser instead of the annual chocolate drive.”Recycling art and craft supplies Denim is not the only thing Paperworks is recycling.Volunteers are repackaging and selling donated art and craft supplies from the Paper and the Works shop at the back of Canberra’s re-use facility The Green Shed. In a small studio in Canberra, artisans are recycling unwanted denim jeans and jackets by turning them into paper. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
Denim paper turned into cards and seed tiles Paperworks employs three part-time artisans from disadvantaged backgrounds who make the paper.Sarah May Sadler, 57, is one of the artisans who has been crafting paper products for five years.”It’s very relaxing, it’s quite meditative; with a lot of the things that we do they’re kind of repetitive and you can sort of meditate as you’re going along,” she said. Canberrans can donate art and craft supplies to the Paper and the Works project by clearly marking the items as “For Paperworks” and dropping them off at The Green Shed. (ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)
But to do that, Paperworks needs more volunteers. and then lay that wet sheet on top of a felt and the paper is left to dry, which can take about a week.”Paperworks used to run an annual jeans drive but currently has a full stock of denim. “We are really grateful to still be here since 2009; there are many times when we thought we wouldn’t be around and I think it’s only thanks to the Canberra community’s support over all these years,” Ms Pieterse said.
(ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers) ABC Radio Canberra

By

Penny Travers

Updated

May 29, 2017 19:24:27

Photo:
Two pairs of jeans make about 40 sheets of paper which become cards and notebook covers.
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Slang class helps Aussie newbies to Kal learn the lingo

(ABC Goldfields-Esperance: Nathan Morris) ABC Goldfields

By

Nathan Morris

Posted

May 29, 2017 07:35:57

Photo:
Joginder Singh, Kuldib Singh, Dave Wilson and Gaurev Raheja at a weekly Australian slang class.
“There’s a bit of a turnover depending on what sort of visas they’re here on.”

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Mining engineer Morteza Abyazani speaks Persian as his first language, and attends classes to gain a better understanding of Australian slang. How bonzer is your knowledge of Australian slang? He organised a regular meeting of his Persian-speaking friends and family at the local library and that is where he met native English speaker, Dave Wilson.”I could hear them chattering amongst each other, and they were looking through these booklets that they had in front of them,” he said.Mr Wilson said, as he listened, he began to recognise the very unique vernacular and phrases they were trying to understand.”I turned and said to them at one point, ‘Are you trying to learn Australian slang?'” he said.Feeling like an outsiderWithout someone to explain the meaning and context of the foreign and often strange phrases, the group was struggling.”Do a uey, or maybe, that’s a ute,” said Mr Abyazani, remembering learning words that were once foreign.”What’s ute? We took a gander at the Macquarie Aussie Slang Dictionary to pull out the most true blue lingo we could find. What does it mean?”A ute — is that a car?”He said missing those nuances of the language fed a feeling of exclusion.”Because I couldn’t communicate, I tried to, but all the time I missed some part of the communication,” he said.So Mr Wilson joined the group, and since August 2014, working their way through the textbook, he has been helping newcomers to Kalgoorlie understand and use Australian slang.”We’ve had people come from Africa, India, China, Korea, France, Italy, we’ve got some Filipinos here now, we’ve got a couple of Punjabis here,” he said. (ABC Goldfields-Esperance: Nathan Morris)
Mr Abyazani said the process of learning the roots of Australian slang broadened his understanding of the people and the place.”It’s not only slang for language, because it’s really about Australia, so we can really understand what is the culture of Australia, how we have to communicate with other people,” he said.Mr Wilson said the process of reviewing a language and culture he already knew well, has given him cause to reflect.”It’s made me aware of how isolated we are, the origins of the language, initially coming from the origins of convicts, from England and the Gentry or the governorship,” he said. Mr Abyazani is a mining engineer from a Iran and a confident English speaker, who once worked as a Persian translator before arriving in WA.”The way that I learned the English is different,” he said.Mr Abyazani said it was communicating with local workmates that he used to find challenging.”They said, ‘Are you going to join us this arvo?'”I said, ‘what is this arvo?’ “What is that, where is that?”Approaching the challenge as he would an engineering project, Mr Abyazani sourced a textbook on Australian slang, and set to work on the exercises. If I’ve done a Harold Holt, what did I do? “[They] were the two classes that arrived here, then you had the settlers living in great isolation.”They weren’t academics, they weren’t people who’d been to school, they were people who needed to communicate effectively both for their entertainment and efficiency.”The history of our slang language has come from those people.”Three years later, Mr Abyazani said earning the local slang had changed how he felt in his new home of Kalgoorlie.”Sometimes you feel yourself, you are not part of this community, you cannot stay anymore,” he said.”But now no, I don’t have this feeling, I really feel myself, being part of Australia.”
An Australian slang class is helping newcomers to Kalgoorlie understand local phrases and feel more at home.Every week, a small group of people from a variety of non-English speaking countries, meet in the Kalgoorlie library to learn about Aussie slang.”I couldn’t understand what they’re really talking about,” said Morteza Abyazani, remembering when he first arrived in the Western Australian Goldfields five years ago.
Three bloody good reasons to embrace swearing
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Is it a budgie smuggler or a bushman's clock? Take our Aussie slang quiz

Meet the retired teachers who refuse to stop educating

ABC Radio Darwin

By

Mark Rigby

Posted

May 29, 2017 12:28:37

Photo:
Edna and John Rivas hope to inspire more seniors to give back to their community. (ABC Radio Darwin: Mark Rigby)
“My chronological age is 71.”I consider myself as a fully fledged senior who is retired but fully attached to the community.”He said staying active, challenging himself mentally and contributing to his community made him feel much younger.”I feel as though my body is still working at the age of about 55.”‘Just open your eyes’In some ways Mr Rivas and his wife are unlike other retirees; in other ways they share similarities.The couple are avid travellers, making regular trips to the Philippines and exploring the world. They also enjoy spending a quiet morning at home with their children and grandchildren, or pottering about the garden on a warm tropical afternoon.Where they differ is how much they give back to the community they call home. Photo:
Mr Rivas says volunteering his time to teach children the wonders of science makes him feel young at heart. Science means so much to retired teacher John Rivas that he refuses to give up educating kids on its wonders.Mr Rivas taught high school science for more than 35 years before he extinguished the flame on his classroom career in 2010.But upon retiring he found himself unable to contain his passion for the subject.”We live in an environment that is always interacting with science.”We live, we sleep, we eat, we breathe with science and that’s the kind of message I like to tell — we are living in a scientific world, use it and engage with it.”
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Jingili Primary Science Expo
Mr Rivas’s enthusiasm for science education soon led him back to the schoolyard, although this time around the children under his tutelage were much smaller.For the past four years he and his wife Edna, also a former teacher, have run an annual science exhibition at Jingili Primary School in Darwin’s northern suburbs.”Retirement for me does not mean it’s the end of the line for community engagement or helping promote science and science education to those who need it most — children,” Mr Rivas said.And as much as the children enjoy taking part in the science exhibitions, it is clear Mr and Mrs Rivas enjoy them too.”We’ve pledged to keep coming back for as long as our health will allow us,” he said.Only as old as you feelIn true scientific fashion, Mr Rivas described himself in the way a palaeontologist might describe a fossil. (Supplied: Edna and John Rivas)
Mr Rivas said every retiree deserved to take time for themselves as reward for a lifetime of work.And while he begrudged nobody for doing so, he said he hoped his and his wife’s efforts might serve as some form of inspiration to other seniors.”It’s fun to travel but when you come home, re-engage in the community and put something back in.”Give even the littlest bit of service to whatever sector of the community you would like to serve, but serve it with gusto, serve it with passion and serve it with dedication and commitment.”Just open your eyes — there’s a lot of community activities out there.”
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Meet the woman buying houses for the homeless

ABC Radio Melbourne

By

Simon Leo Brown

Updated

May 29, 2017 23:54:17
“I guess we felt shocked and I suppose a bit guilty — we didn’t realise how bad the housing situation in Melbourne was,” she told ABC Radio Melbourne’s Rafael Epstein. Meet Melbourne’s rough sleepers Some of the hundreds of people sleeping rough on Melbourne’s streets talk about how they ended up there. She said she had spoken to youth housing providers and government organisations about how to best administer the properties, which are still awaiting settlement.”It’s very much a work in progress.” Homeless as a teenager

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Jessica Pearce was shocked by the sight of people sleeping rough in Flinders Street. “The streets were lined with people sleeping on mattresses or on the ground.”I guess it just touched me and I thought that maybe there was something that we could do.”‘I wanted him to have stable accommodation’ The couple spent two nights wandering the streets handing out $20 and $50 notes to those sleeping rough and talking with them about their circumstances. “I wanted him to have stable accommodation for the children.”Four for the price of oneMs Pearce had recently finished paying off her own mortgage and was looking to buy an investment property in inner Melbourne.But after her experience she decided to buy houses in cheaper areas, and two weeks ago purchased four houses “all about three or four days apart from each other”. The properties in Corio, Lara, Morwell and Moe will provide either short-term crisis accommodation or a stable, long-term residence. (ABC News: James Hancock)
Just why Ms Pearce has taken such a generous step might be explained by her own history.Three days before she turned 16 her mother and stepfather asked her to leave home. A woman has been so moved by the sight of Melbourne’s homeless people that she has started buying houses for them.Jessica Pearce was staying at a hotel in Flinders Street with her partner over the Christmas period when they came face to face with city’s homeless problem. The propertiesLara: Short-term accommodation for people with children who are on a waitlist for housingCorio: Accommodation for homeless young people studying or in an apprenticeshipMorwell: Short-term crisis accommodation for up to three monthsMoe: Apartment providing permanent accommodation for up to three young people
“The price that I would have paid for one house in town was the same as buying four in cheaper areas,” she said. “I’d already been working at Hungry Jack’s so I just took on some extra hours.”It’s funny, at the time I didn’t think much of it, I kind of took it in my stride.”She confided in her maths teacher, with whom she had a good relationship, and he set her up in stable accommodation.”He was connected with a house in Elwood that provided accommodation for young people who wanted to stay in school, which is probably a lot of the reason that I had the idea of providing a house like that myself now.”Ms Pearce now has a successful business and her four children “have not really wanted for anything”.”I’ve probably got it better than most people,” she said. The house in Lara, for example, will be provided for up to three months to people with children who are on a waiting list for long-term accommodation.”It’s quite a lovely house, it’s very much like you would imagine a grandmother’s house to be,” Ms Pearce said. One of those people was a man who was sleeping on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral.”He had a two- and a three-year-old who were staying with his ex-partner and he wasn’t going to have access to them because he didn’t have somewhere to live,” Ms Pearce said.Ms Pearce and her partner invited him back to their hotel for two nights, before putting him up at a motel for a month.
'Cold and scary': What it's like to be homeless
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Melbourne businesswoman Jessica Pearce has bought four houses to be provided to homeless people.

The Un-Material Girl: Fast fashion addict now an upcycling activist

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it was endless.”Ms Musch came back and sold 80 per cent of her wardrobe.Her war cry became: “Don’t add to the pile.””I now challenge myself to sew the things I want to buy or refashion second-hand clothes I buy.”She shares her tips and tricks with fellow fashion lovers via social media.”I think my biggest strength is being able to turn something ugly into something cool.”I don’t know if I’ll ever feel comfortable with the fact that the fashion industry at its heart is unsustainable; I wanted to find ways to do the best I can and share it with others.”I know I can shop and spend less and find more interesting pieces going to markets, rather than going to a store, and then I won’t find someone with the same thing.”Change your waysShe swears by the 333 concept, in which people have 33 items in their wardrobe on rotation for three months. External Link:

Upcycling second hand clothes
“It changed the whole way that I looked at the fashion industry,” Ms Musch said.”I knew I had to change everything I was doing.”I was a fast fashion addict, I was spending more than $100 a week on clothes … While many young Australians just reach for what’s on the rack at their favourite fashion stores, one twenty-something upcycles second-hand clothes to stay on trend.Leah Musch began sharing her adventures of being a conscious fashion consumer on social media as The Un-Material Girl.She now has more than 3,000 followers on Instagram. Her alter ego was born after she went on an eye-opening volunteering trip to Brazil and saw The True Cost, a documentary showing the impact the fashion industry has on the people who make clothes. Would I wear this more than 30 times? “Many of us go back to wearing the same thing so just let the other clothes go.”She also suggests thinking twice before buying something new by asking questions such as: Do I need this? (ABC Radio Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
Ms Musch, who is a student at Billy Blue College of Design in Brisbane, will soon travel to Stockholm and Milan to continue her fashion studies.”It’s a controversial thing to be sustainable in the fashion industry.”I still come up against battles, but I’m going to try and learn as much as I can.”I love exploring sustainable and ethical fashion and I hope that it could possibly lead to a potential label.” Photo:
Leah Musch aims to create sustainable fashion often with second-hand material. External Link:

The Un-Material Girl shows how to follow fashion with thrift shopping.
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War on Waste podcast
(ABC Radio Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe) ABC Radio Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

May 30, 2017 10:20:53

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Leah Musch uses second-hand clothing to create her wardrobe of latest styles.

Meet the better halves making their outback town better

(ABC Radio Darwin: Mark Rigby) ABC Radio Darwin

By

Mark Rigby

Posted

May 30, 2017 11:30:02

Photo:
Barbara Sullivan, Clair O’Brien and Moira Lanzarin sell homemade cakes to raise money for Mataranka.
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Darwin 0800
(ABC Radio Darwin: Mark Rigby)
Besides revamping the town hall, the MBHC has also been the driving force behind many of Mataranka’s celebrated community events.Each year the club hosts a Christmas tree party in the town with food, a Santa Claus and free presents for young children.”When you see the joy and satisfaction on the kids’ faces, and from the community who are able to have services, it makes it all worthwhile,” Ms Lanzarin said.”It’s just a great opportunity to do something for the community and help out.”Blokes welcomeAlthough the name of the club and its logo suggest it is exclusively for women, former club president Merran Williams said men were welcome to join.”As long as you’ve got two legs and two arms that you’re willing to do a fair bit of work with when you’re asked to, there’s no requirements,” she said.”We did have a male member, mainly because he wanted one of our t-shirts, but he joined and he was quite a good member.”

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MBHC members saw the funny side of only cutting half of their cake during their 40 year celebrations. And this year they celebrated 40 years of service to their tiny outback community, more than 400 kilometres south of Darwin.Established as a women’s social club in 1977, MBHC members soon realised they had the power to do more than just talk about improving their town.They had the collective knowledge and skill to raise money and make things better.”A lot of our fundraising in the later years has been through catering for events, and then for the past couple of years we’ve been doing regular market stalls during the dry season,” club member Moira Lanzarin said.”But in the past the club has done all sorts of really creative fundraising events; in 40 years you go through a fair few ideas.”‘It wasn’t a very nice place to be’Fellow member Barbara Sullivan said the money raised was once slated to be used for the construction of a chapel for the town.”That had to be put aside because we could never get far enough ahead to be able to pay for it entirely,” she said.Recently the club turned its attention to the town’s rather sorry community hall by giving it a complete revamp and installing air conditioning.”It now gets used three or four times a week rather than just every now and again because it wasn’t a very nice place to be,” Ms Sullivan said. Meet the MBHC members Club members Barbara Sullivan, Merran Williams, Moira Lanzarin and Clair O’Brien discuss what it means to belong to the better half. The saying that “behind every successful farmer is a wife who works in town” rings true in the remote outback community of Mataranka.But in the case of Mataranka, the proverbial wives do not actually work in town, rather they work for the town, for free.They are the women of the Mataranka Better Half Club (MBHC). Photo:
The club has received many awards for its contributions to Mataranka and its members are striving for more. (ABC Radio Darwin: Mark Rigby)
Ms Williams said while most of the community welcomed the work done by the MBHC, the club was not without its detractors.”One of our names is the ‘bitter half club’ and [people say] all we do is gossip but that’s not true at all,” she laughed.”The name is what it is but we answer to all.”‘It’s just who you are’Clair O’Brien, Ms Lanzarin’s mother, said she felt proud that her daughter had joined the MBHC, but was even more proud the club had lasted 40 years.”We’re a family cattle property operation so we work together all the time and then this is our social time when we give back to the community,” Ms O’Brien said.”Working with Moira is nothing new for me so I just say it’s succession planning.”She said the key to the club’s survival was its dedicated members who were prepared to listen to the community.”Sometimes it’s just who you are or what your make up is; some people have it I guess and we just like giving.”

Vodka-swilling choir from Mullumbimby cracks the big time in Russia

A bunch of Aussie blokes who started out bonding over vodka and Russian folk songs have become an overnight sensation on the other side of the world.Dustyesky is a 28-man choir from the northern New South Wales town of Mullumbimby.They formed over a mutual love of vodka and Russian music, despite not speaking the language or having any other connection to the country.Their repertoire resulted in them being booked to sing at an event for Russian expats in Brisbane, which was featured in a Russian-Australian newspaper. Photo:
Dustyesky performing in a cabaret and burlesque show at Brunswick Heads (Facebook: Dustyesky)
From Brisbane event to audience of millionsDustyesky member Andrew Swain said that article was the catalyst for a media snowball that ended with them appearing on Russian national television broadcaster Channel One, with an audience of 250 million people. (Facebook: Dustyesky)
Dustyesky member Mark Swivel said the choir had also received hundreds of messages of support from Russians on social media.”Apparently Australia is like the last frontier to Russians. They have very little idea of Australia at all and so the curiosity value is huge,” Mr Swivel said.”It seems that people are touched that blokes from such a strange culture so far away would be interested in singing Russian songs at all. External Link:

Russian television
“The article went online and subsequently a newspaper in Belarus lifted the article and re-jigged it, and each time I’ve read a further article that’s been translated it becomes more bizarre,” Mr Swain said.”The last piece of information I read about Mullumbimby was that all the men here work with timber, so it becomes more bizarre the more it becomes Russian-ified.”Then we got a message on the phone with a little video attached, interestingly enough in the middle of an interview we were giving to another Russian TV station via Skype in the middle of the night. “There have been some comments about our accents, but the general response has been overwhelmingly positive, and you can feel the emotion from people.”Mr Swivel said some Russians had thanked Dustyesky for positively portraying Russian culture.”There are some comments from people that Russia is getting a bit of a hiding in the news these days,” Mr Swivel said.”So, with a sense of wounded national pride, to hear the old folk songs and Red Army songs is incredibly moving for them and it’s a bit of a boost if you can believe it.”We’re just a bunch of ratbags who like to get together and have a bit of a sing on a Tuesday night.”It doesn’t get crazier really.”Dustyesky hopes to visit Russia in 2018 to coincide with the FIFA World Cup. “So, we held it up to the phone to Vilda [the reporter doing the interview] and said ‘What are they saying?’ and she said ‘They are very excited to be seeing people from Australia singing Russian songs’.”It was the kind of man-bites-dog story at the end of the news saying ‘Check out the crazy Aussies from Mullumbimby singing songs from our heartland’.”The story was played several times on Channel One news programs and has resulted in an offer from an entertainment executive to fly the choir to Russia for a tour.Morale-boost for Russians

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Dustyesky performed at the Brunswick Heads Memorial Hall.
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'You feel totally pumped': Community choirs growing as members reap benefits
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The Alchemy Chorus in tune with people with dementia
ABC North Coast

By

Joanne Shoebridge

and

Samantha Turnbull

Updated

May 31, 2017 11:14:36

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Dustyesky is an Australian choir gaining international attention after appearing on Russian television.
Map:
Mullumbimby 2482

Famous Dex – Xans

The money I got it, you know it’s on me (wait)
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Xans, xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Rich forever everywhere

Xans, xans, xans, xans
You run up me, put them holes in your pants
Polo he right on the beat

This boy he not in the streets
Xans, xans

Xans, xans, xans, xans
Xans, xans
Xans, xans, xans, xans
I got a bitch from Japan

30 on me if you blink
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Xans, xans, xans, xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Got a lil’ bitch she a dime
[Hook]
[Verse]
You run up me, put them holes in your pants
You run up me, put them holes in your pants
[Hook]

Hope baby girl’s no fan, I’m ballin’ like Cam
Sipping Wock, diamond paint
Diamonds wet like a sink
Xans, xans, xans, xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Run up on me, catch a body
You know we did it again
She like to get off the xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
They geekin’ right up on my body
Look at that AP, it’s time
Fuck on my friends
I got that bitch off the xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
You run up me, put them holes in your pants
Lookin’ for me a lil hotty, ballin’ like Scotty (wait)
Xans, xans, xans, xans
Dexter back poppin’ them xans
Poppin’ xans till I’m sleep
Xans, xans, xans, xans
Call that Flash Shawn, he got all that drink
Two xans I’m fine
Xans, xans
Xans, xans, xans, xans
They got me lost out my mind
Dexter back poppin’ them xans

Dexter back poppin’ them xans

Chris Young – Losing Sleep (Lyric Video)

Baby, so…

Fall into me, let me breathe the air you breathe

When we’re losing sleep
When it comes to us every single touch is something special
[Chorus]
Fall into me, let me breathe the air you breathe
When we’re losing sleep

When we’re wrapped up in those sheets
When we’re losing sleep
[Chorus]
Yeah, we’re winning, we’re losing
Fall into me, let me breathe the air you breathe

We don’t need to dream at all

When it comes to us every single touch is something special
Baby, let’s just lose control, lose control
That I love you, let me show you, oh
I can take you anywhere you wanna be

Yeah, we’re winning, we’re losing
[Outro]
I can handle every single curve, you know
Turn all the lights down low
When we’re wrapped up in those sheets
[Verse 2]
[Verse 1]
Yeah, we’re winning, we’re losing
When we’re losing sleep
Turn all the lights down low
I can take you anywhere you wanna be
Light a candle
When it comes to us every single touch is something special
When we’re wrapped up in those sheets
Real life, when it’s this good don’t you know
Yeah, we’re winning, we’re losing
Light a candle
I can take you anywhere you wanna be, yeah

RJmrLA – Blammer (Mrla Album)

[Intro]
Never be a sucker for a bop
I pull up vert I pull out first
Rolling with my blammer on
Johnnys pulled me over did the most
Rolling with my blammer on
Play my own I’m Al Capone
I’mma need that back in for them shows
Iced up got December in my tooth
I splashed my shirt I smell like gerp
[Verse 2]
I had to hand my hammer to my hoe
Ten steps ahead of y’all, ohh
Match that matt black strap with my gear

On spotify with platinum songs
I’m not alone

I pull up vert I pull out first
Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all
Rolling with my blammer on
You flock your sly you back at home
Ten steps ahead of y’all, all y’all
I’m not alone
I splashed my shirt I smell like work
I’m not alone
Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all
I put in work I know my worth
Haters want me dead and gone
Ten steps ahead of y’all, all y’all
I’m not alone
Rolling with my blammer on
Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all

Rolling with my blammer on
Whipping out bands got mileage
[Outro]
I put in work I know my worth

Ten steps ahead of y’all, all y’all
Ooh, the roof, disappear, regroup, reappear
Ten steps ahead of y’all, ohh
I’m not alone
I’m not alone
I meant like work I, ooh
You flash your girl these shells is perked
She don’t use hands thats sucka
True story tip before a lap dance
Gotta stay alert never lacking
Rolling with my blammer on
Rolling with my blammer on
This blammer too big to disguise it

I’m not alone

Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all
Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all
Chipped up got my skillet in the booth
Go make that hammer get that blammy on
Rolling with my blammer on
Mandatory action, mandatory shoot at Troy Ave shit
They almost took me in that was close
Send a slug knock your chimney off the roof
Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all
My spot is fly I’m rapping gold
Ooh, I ain’t scared of y’all
Ten steps ahead of y’all
[Hook]
Ten steps ahead of y’all, ohh
Rolling with my blammer on
[Verse 1]
[Hook]
[Hook]
A gangster stuff in casts and cones
I can buy your trap that hole
Homies with me and I’m on
Tinted up living GLE Coupé
Rolling with my blammer on
I made it past the average Joe

RJmrLA – Thank God (Mrla Album)

[Hook: RJ]
I’mma keep it real with ya
On God I’m a real real nigga
Finna slide for the real nigga

I ain’t feeling you nigga
Let me squeeze take the block thats a gang missing
I ain’t feeling ya niggas ya niggas fraud, nah
Shake something, take something
You niggas lying on stage to stay in the loop
Thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God
Thank God for the real real niggas
Stay with it can’t give it nah nigga nah, nah, nah nigga nah
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Doing 5 on a real nigga
Stay with it can’t give it nah nigga nah, nah, nah nigga nah
I ain’t feeling ya niggas ya niggas fraud, nah
On God I’m a real real nigga
Life sentence, for the team I’ll take one

[Hook: RJ]
Y’all ain’t real no more, I’m the realest y’all know
I ain’t feeling ya niggas ya niggas fraud, nah
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God
Thank God I’m a real nigga
[Hook: RJ]
[Verse 3: Blac Youngsta]
[Verse 2]
On God I’m a real real nigga
One time for the real real niggas
Fake real niggas how you revealing the truth?
Niggas soft like the still liquor
One time for the real niggas
Thank God on my worst day
Thank God I’m a real nigga
20 [?]
Some believe in God, some believe in Allah
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Cross me let the church pray
Thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God
In a beam got the Glock showing state prison
Stay with it can’t give it nah nigga nah, nah, nah nigga nah
If I die pray my pops is the gate keeper
Thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God
Niggas still throwing shots at a still picture
Threw the scope on the K they easy to boost
Nah nigga nah
Fuck nigga, I been a real nigga since day one
On God I’m a real nigga
Extended clip AK something, broad day something
Nigga God know I’m burnt yeah
Thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God
[Verse 1]
I did time with some real niggas
On God, real real nigga
I woke up thank God I’m a real nigga
Young nigga face something
When your bitch cheat on you I hope I be the one drilling her nigga
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Ties like [?]
I fucked that bitch to make you mad I ain’t feeling her nigga
Send them back to my whip grab that stick shit look gothic
Nigga sliding with the opps get the same treatment

[Outro: RJmrLA]
And I thank my God all my pride ain’t defrost me
Thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God, thank God

Finna slide for the real niggas
When you die I hope I be the one killing you nigga

On God I’m a real nigga
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Thank God I’m a real nigga
On God I’m a real nigga
If this Glock all I got then I’m [?]
Make lil’ niggas fake but teach ’em to shoot
Niggas dying on they birthday
Nigga that’s that get back get off me I’m saucy
CMG, 400 Summers, we finna see so much money
He the one that made me squeezing off .380
Gang slide for the real niggas
Thank God I’m a real nigga
Thank God for the real real niggas
Word to my momma
On God I’m- On God I’m a real real nigga

Here I keep a 9 in these streets Iguodala
And they still getting hot, can’t chill with us

RJmrLA – Not To Be (Mrla Album)

What you not to be? Trusted
Y’all tryna be famous
Goddamn I need a Mexican
They be fucking on these bitches so I’m fucking on these bitches
These bitches be having like four or five niggas
Bitch you not to be
Bitch you not to be
[Verse 1: YG]
My house got too many piece
Bitch you not to be
Bitch you not to be
‘Posed to be loyal, goddamn I need a Mexican
If it’s burnt at the bottom nigga cut the juice
Bitch you not to be
All my hunnids come blue got them ventilated
Bitch you not to be
You not to be trusted What you not to be?
What you not to be?
I’m the nigga never loving these bitches
What you not to be?
[Intro: YG]
Might try to send some niggas to kill for me
Coming new like its renovated
Bitch you not to be
Bitch you not to be

I fucked you a nasty bitch
Same old trust issues
Bitch you not to be
Who you fucked on the A-List?
Bitch you not to be
Bitch you not to be

Bitch you not to be
Told me you a classy bitch
Who you tryna play bitch?

Nigga if we talking drugs that bitch impress me
Bitch you not to be
[Verse 2: RJmrLA]
You might try to steal from me
What you not to be? You not to be trusted
Bitch you not to be
What you not to be? Trusted
[Hook: YG]
What you not to be?

Bitches come when they think a nigga crossed over
Damn, that’s wrong, damn bitch you so wrong
I don’t even trust the ones with good intentions
I don’t trust no bitch far as I can throw her, no
Bitch you not to be
Bitch you not to be
Bitch you not to be
Never trusting these bitches only fucking these bitches
Where your grandma stay bitch?
[Hook: YG]
My homie told me so How I know?
Soon as you show them love they burn they bridges
[Hook: YG]
You been plotting on the low
Who you told not to say shit?
Bitch you not to be
I’mma do what I’m accustomed to
You not to be trusted What you not to be?
Trusted What you not to be?
What you not to be? You not to be trusted
Bitch I don’t fuck with you, I don’t fuck with you
Bitch what my name is?
I don’t trust you bitches
Bitch you not to be
Look bitch you been hanging with my enemies
Bitch you not to be

Bitch you not to be

RJmrLA – 2 Grown (Mrla Album)

[Hook]

I left the roof on today
Baby let me take you from here no pilgrim
Too out, too lit, too grown, to play, the games you play
I’m too grown for games
I’m too grown for games
Moving all your weight out the way
[Intro]
We fuck more and say less till we show and tell
Flat back brought it back out like a new butt
Breaking all the rules but I’m fixing all your bruises
All these blue hundreds on me looking loca
Bitch I’m too grown for games
Just to be a real one
Left the roof up, flat top, crew cut
I’m too on for the groupie lovie, forreal
Too out, too lit, too grown, to play, the games you play
She said all I ever wanted was
[Verse 2]
[Verse 1]
Bitch we too grown for games
Bitch I’m too grown for games
Tennis shoes on display
But I’m too on to play
Still you have it cool good views on the pier rise
Bend about the waist like its yoga
It ain’t over
Too out, too lit, I mean too on to play the games
Shopping up the states introduce you to my jeweler
Haters come in twos, ice flooded in my ear drums
You ain’t gotta spend long looking for a real don
But I’m too on to play
You was feeling used ex dude can’t depend on
Bitch we too grown for games
I’m too on to play
I left the roof on today
Y’all too on to play

[Hook]
I left the roof on today
One I can spend one, trust to depend on

I can get your groove back like we in a movie
Scratch that, add a tax to this new drug
Hold up a unit in your face call it close up, yeah yeah
Too out, too lit, I mean too on to play the games
Champagne with the steak and a morning pill
Move it way out the way
Find time to escape and enjoy the ville

Y’all too on to play
Playing side bitches to the left, let you know its real
Bitch I’m too grown for games
Bitch we too grown for games
Tennis shoes on display
Bitch I’m too grown for games
Walked up in the room spotlight got ’em deer dumb
I’m too on to play
Y’all too on to play