Prospector uncovers WWII medal lost from a flapping suitcase in the 1950s

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Prospector Andrew Lawless found the 1939-45 Star Medal at Royal Park near Melbourne’s centre. (Supplied: Andrew Lawless)

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Mildura 3500
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Andrew Lawless has dug up several old Australian Army rising sun badges and other war memorabilia but nothing with a name on it before. How he’s dropped it in that spot or someone else has, I don’t know,” he said.”You could probably come up with 100 different stories, but he would only know the real one.”It’s been quite unbelievable actually.”We put it on social media on Saturday night and we’ve had a phenomenal amount of interest [and leads to] paths we’ve been given to try and chase up the fellow.”Mr Lawless said he would like to pass the medal on to Mr Robinson’s family but finding them was difficult, given the soldier was born in 1917.”We’re trying to chase up nieces and nephews and the like, but it’s a bit of wild goose chase but we’ve got the feelers out,” he said.”He had two sisters who were born and bred in Mildura and I believe they passed away in the Mildura area.”Mr Lawless said any family members of Mr Robinson could contact him through Facebook to get in touch.He said his hobby of metal detecting had led him to many old war camps, looking for coins and relics.”I’ve come across Rising Sun badges and shoulder flashes, and old coins — the oldest coin I’ve found at this particular camp is from 1812, an old silver shilling, but nothing I can tie to anyone personally,” he said. (Supplied: Andrew Lawless) (Supplied: Andrew Lawless)
Searching for descendantsMr Lawless said the internet had been a vital tool in researching the medal.”You think you’ve uncovered the best and then something else pops up. Back in 1951 he applied for them and got them in 1953.”I think the family would have duplicates, but for me to find the real one, the original, considering he had lost them, is quite amazing.”Mr Lawless said Mr Robinson had enlisted in Darwin on July 21, 1943 and was discharged on December 4, 1945.”It’s actually quite a funny story — the further you did deeper into this medal and who owned it — the story just gets better and better to be honest,” he said.”He was actually born in Mildura, but enlisted in Darwin, and ended up in living in South Australia for a little bit, then moving back to Mildura and was cremated in Townsville.”He was one for adventure, I dare say.”

Infographic:
The 1939–45 World War II Star Medal dug up in Royal Park, Melbourne. A World War II medal that was lost after it flew out of a suitcase somewhere between Adelaide and Melbourne has turned up underground near Melbourne’s city centre.Prospector Andrew Lawless dug up a World War II service medal — a 1939-1945 Star — at Royal Park, near Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital.The name CW Robinson adorns the medal and after extensive research Mr Lawless and his wife Taryn discovered its owner was Charles William Robinson, born on February 22, 1917, in Mildura.In trying to find the medal’s rightful owner, the couple believe they have uncovered a serendipitous tale.Mr Lawless said research had revealed that Mr Robinson was driving his car from Adelaide to his home in Mildura when he lost the medals.”His suitcase on top of the roof of his car flew open so all of his personal belongings, as in war medals and paperwork flew out — so how I’ve come across this is quite unbelievable,” Mr Lawless said.”Online you see that he applied to get duplicate medals made.
ABC Mildura-Swan Hill

By

Lauren Henry

Posted

May 11, 2018 07:51:50

Darwin to Melbourne: A cross-country journey to save a baby’s life

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(ABC Radio Darwin: Jesse Thompson) ABC Radio Darwin

By Jesse Thompson

Posted

May 11, 2018 09:36:29

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Baby Davey Marika and his mother hope to return home to Nhulunbuy soon.
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Darwin 0800
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Julie Marika hails from Nhulnubuy and travelled with her grandson to Melbourne for the first time. He has yet to lay eyes on his home town of Nhulunbuy, and many of his family back in that coastal community at one point thought they would never see him alive. Photo:
Louise Woodward is a paediatrician with the Royal Darwin Hospital. Two hospitals at opposite ends of the country have coordinated an Australian-first rescue journey to save the infant, using new technology they hope will improve the survival rate of critically ill babies across the Northern Territory.Davey was born in Darwin the day the tropical northern city was being battered by Cyclone Marcus, and entered respiratory failure after developing severe lung problems a short time later. Cradled in his mother’s arms, Davey Marika is just six weeks old and barely knows life outside of hospital walls. (ABC Radio Darwin: Jesse Thompson)
“We had come to the realisation that he was going to die without further treatment, and we were really hopeful that he would make it to Melbourne, but we were also very worried that he was too unstable to move,” Dr Woodward said.Journey made possible thanks to donationA new neonatal transport incubator, donated to the hospital by the Humpty Dumpty Foundation and only recently made ready for use, provided a solution to the tyranny of distance. (ABC Radio Darwin: Jesse Thompson)
“It was a very, very frightening journey for my grandson and for me and my daughter too,” Ms Marika said.The incubator donation will mean other critically ill babies like Davey — including those from remote and regional areas in the NT — can now be transferred interstate to get the care they need.The Marika family are glad it has kept their newest member alive, but are looking forward to finally returning home to Nhulunbuy soon. Photo:
The transport unit will allow critically ill babies to be transferred interstate. (ABC Radio Darwin: Jesse Thompson)
According to Dr Woodward, the trip still made hospital staff nervous because of how meticulously it had to be mapped out; even placing the baby in the incubator took planning.And until Davey’s journey, no Australian team had attempted a trip of such distance.”This is the first time that a baby has been transported such a long way using a high frequency ventilator,” Dr Woodward said.”It’s an Australian first for Darwin, and it’s not often you get to say that.”The incubator is effectively an intensive care unit fit for the skies.It monitors babies’ temperatures as they are given medication and, crucially, oxygen through a ventilator, and Careflight’s fixed-wing aircraft are equipped to host the technology.”If you imagine this is the baby’s lung, it means the ventilator can improve the condition of the baby with these pulses of air that go through,” Dr Woodward said, holding the ventilator as it bounced with air it dispelled.”It also uses an enormous amount of power, so we had to be very meticulous about the type of equipment we took on board.”These constraints meant they had about seven hours to travel to Melbourne.They touched down shortly after six.’My heart cried’Today, baby Davey is on the path to recovery.”When I got the phone call from Dr Louise that he’d arrived in Melbourne safe, I thanked heaven for the journey and the doctors,” grandmother Julie Marika said.”I was the happiest grandma, and my heart cried.”The family were happy to have their baby return to Darwin this week, after a long journey to a new city burdened by the thought that little Davey might die. “Despite having lots and lots of treatment here in the neonatal intensive care unit at Royal Darwin Hospital, he continued to deteriorate,” paediatrician Louise Woodward said.”We faced the issue of not having any further treatment to offer him.”There was treatment available, but many thousands of kilometres away.
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Missing dog lured out of bush with bit of roast chicken

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ABC Radio Brisbane

By Patrick Williams

Updated

May 11, 2018 16:04:51

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Dickie the dog went missing from his Brisbane family for eight days. (Supplied: Reyna Watson)
Loyal blue heeler stays with three-year-old lost in bush overnight
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Dickie safe and well at his rescuer’s home. (Supplied: Simon Gagliardi)
Ms Watson was put onto his whereabouts after a woman running in the Brisbane Trail Half Marathon last weekend contacted her after seeing a small white dog near the Gold Creek Reservoir.Volunteers mobilised to search the area.Rhiannon Gagliardi was the first to spot Dickie after coming across small footprints in the mud on the trail.She convinced her husband to take the day off work and got a sitter for her baby so she could search for the lost dog.Ms Gagliardi has two West Highland terriers of her own and said she could not imagine how worried she would be if it was her dogs lost in bushland.Not wanting to scare him off, she coaxed him closer by offering the hungry dog some barbecue chicken.”Our westies have chicken, rice and veggies and they love the chicken so I thought that would be the perfect lure if we came across Dickie,” she said.”He was so scared, it was awful, he was looking terrible because he’d been out there for such a long time.”I’m so pleased that we found him, I was so sick knowing he was out there in the bush.”Dickie was taken to a local vet later that day — he had lost weight, had sore feet and hips, but apart from that was fine.Ms Watson said Dickie had kept close to her side since coming home.”He sleeps cuddled up to me on the bed and he follows me around all day,” she said.”We are going to fix our fences so they’re westie proof.” A dog missing in bushland west of Brisbane for over a week was coaxed out of hiding with a bit of help from a barbecue roasted chicken.Dickie the West Highland terrier had only been in Reyna Watson’s care for two days when he managed to escape her home at The Gap.”He was very frightened because we left him on his own,” she said.”The last conversation with my mum just before I got him was me reassuring her that he would be fine at our place and wouldn’t be able to escape.”For this to happen, it was terrible.”Ms Watson took on Dickie from her mother after she passed away, and moved him from Sydney to her home in Brisbane.The seven-year-old was missing for eight days.He was finally found in bushland about 10 kilometres from Ms Watson’s home on Wednesday.
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Brisbane 4000

Mother’s Day bloom provides opportunities for people with a disability

Wedding trends put pressure on sourcing cut wildflower industry
ABC Wide Bay

By

Brad Marsellos

Updated

May 11, 2018 18:33:50

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Supported employee Stacey Matthews will help create 9,000 bunches of flowers for Mother’s Day. (ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)

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(ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)
“We have LED lights above the plants and that helps give them their height, to allow easier harvest and stops them budding too early,” Mr Campbell said.”Our farmers really know the secrets to growing chrysanthemums.”We should see a lot of very happy mums this Sunday.”The Endeavour Foundation is Australia’s largest employer of people living with a disability.Mr Campbell said many of the supported employees at the Bundaberg location have been with the organisation long term.”What the team here does every single day is not short of amazing,” he said.”I’ve got a couple of people that have been here 38 years or 40 years of service and they do a variety of tasks around the farm, from Mother’s Day harvest to growing tomatoes and pumpkin for the supermarkets.”So our community supporting us is what makes Endeavour Foundation happen and Endeavour provides work for people with a disability.”

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Employee Gavin Chapman has been part of Endeavour Foundation Industries for 38 years. (ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)
“We plant in the end of November for a May flowering,” he said.”Right now the volunteers are cutting the flowers, stripping the flowers and bunching.”We even have local schools helping — and without their assistance Mother’s Day just wouldn’t happen.”Timing the bloom is vital. A field of colour slowly disappeared as the Endeavour Foundation supported employees and volunteers from Bundaberg, South-east Queensland, to create 9,000 bunches of chrysanthemums for Mother’s Day.The annual harvest is one of the not-for-profit organisation’s major fundraisers, with money raised from the sale of the flowers put back toward supporting people with a disability at the Endeavour Foundation.Preparation for Mother’s Day begins six months before the event and involves the planting of 6,000 multi-coloured chrysanthemums.Bundaberg site manager for Endeavour Foundation Industries Robert Campbell said it was a massive job to grow and harvest the flowers and required community and volunteer support. Photo:
Kaylene Sharkey working in the cold room filled with bunches of chrysanthemums for Mother’s Day. Photo:
Supported employees and volunteers are furiously cutting and bunching flowers from over 6,000 plants. To assist the plants to flower at a coordinated time, Endeavour Foundation Industries used lighting at night. (ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)
The Mother’s Day chrysanthemums bunches end up for sale in the local market and are transported throughout Queensland.
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Bundaberg 4670