Lost dog with epilepsy defies the odds and returns to owner’s arms

Cyclone Iris no match for lost Staffy Rosy
(ABC South West WA: Jessie Aiton)
After scouring the area for the remainder of the day, attention quickly turned to Molly’s need for daily medication to prevent epileptic seizures.”Even if she misses one dose she has seizures that can last up to a minute at a time,” Ms McGeever said.”It is quite severe — the less medication in her system, the more seizures she has.”A disheartened Ms McGeever eventually left the campground but returned often over a two-week period to post notifications of her lost dog, as well as erecting a tent containing dog food she hoped would lure Molly back to their original camping spot.”I honestly thought after day four or five she wouldn’t have been able to look for shelter due to her condition,” Ms McGeever said.”I started to think she had died.”

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Signage that attracted the attention of a farmer who spotted Molly. (ABC South West WA: Jessie Aiton)
After all but giving up hope Ms McGeever was thrilled to receive a call from the manager of Lake Brockman Tourist Park, Jock Cocking, saying a slightly weary — and wary — Molly had been recovered by a local farmer just 1 kilometre from where she went missing.”The farmer had seen the lost dog signs and figured the dog he’d spotted was probably the missing dog,” Ms McGeever said.”Molly’s demeanour was basically, ‘Can you please help me? “I honestly did not think I was going to see her again.” The owner of a rottweiler that went missing in bushland in Western Australia’s south for two weeks suspects the dog’s tendency to suffer epileptic fits may have inadvertently saved its life.Molly the dog wandered away from owner Julia McGeever during a camping trip in the south-west regional town of Cookernup.”We were busy preparing to go for a four-wheel drive trip and all of a sudden we noticed she’d gone missing,” Ms McGeever said.”One minute she was there, then she was gone.”

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Molly the missing rottweiler was found not far from where she went missing. But I don’t know if I can trust you’.”So he spent a bit of time gaining Molly’s trust, opened the door and in she hopped.”Other than appearing to have shed a few kilos, Molly appeared to be “relieved but exhausted” Ms McGeever said.Epilepsy not uncommon in dogsMs McGeever said she believed the side effects of the epileptic seizures may have left Molly slightly “dopey”, which could have prevented her from wandering off to far.Emma Beyes, a veterinarian in the WA south-west town of Vasse, said about 3 per cent of dogs were diagnosed with epilepsy, with symptoms similar to those experienced by humans.Ms Beyes said it “may be possible” that Molly was helped rather than hindered by her epileptic seizures, although she was confident the benefits of any medication would have disappeared completely after two weeks in the wilderness.”Either way, she is one lucky dog,” Ms Beyes said.That’s a sentiment Ms McGeever was in total agreement with.”She’s got some grazing on her top lip, which my vet seems to think was from chewing rocks and sticks, but apart from that there are no injuries at all,” Ms McGeever said.”It feels surreal to have her back, though.
(ABC South West WA: Jessie Aiton) ABC South West WA

By Jessie Aiton

Updated

July 04, 2018 06:39:59

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Molly the rottweiler with owner Julia McGeever and Josh Cocking at the Lake Brockman Tourist Park, not far from where the dog when missing.
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This is why rescuers aren’t teaching the Thai soccer team to dive out of the cave right now

Thai mothers see footage of their sons trapped underground for 12 days
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Teaching the boys to dive out of the cave is one of the rescue options being considered. Now that the 12 boys and the soccer coach have been found inside the sprawling Tham Luang cave complex, all attention is now on how rescuers can get them out.With suggestions that the group could be left underground for weeks, potentially months, until Thailand’s rainy season ends, plenty have been asking the question — why don’t they just swim out with dive equipment?There are lots of reasons why it’s potentially the most dangerous option to free the group, which means there is no rush to get the group out while they’re still receiving food and in good health.Former US Navy Seal Cade Courtley told CNN that teaching the group to dive would be the “last option” he would take.Let’s take a look why.The journey out of the cave is cold, muddy and darkThailand’s Interior Minister Anupong Paojinda summed it best when he described the cave as “unlike diving in a swimming pool”.In fact it’s a long way from it.The water inside the cave is muddy, dark and freezing.Australian cave diver and engineer Ron Allum said even for an experienced diver, the journey would be “quite scary”.”If they have got lights, all you will find is a brown glow in front of you. Photo:
A map shared by a Thai diving website demonstrates the difficult conditions diving rescuers would face. Photo:
Conditions inside the cave are poor, with limited visibility and freezing floodwaters (AP: Tham Luang Rescue Operation Centre)
Restraining the boys is an option if they have to get outBut more heavy rain is forecast for the coming days, which could worsen the flooding in the cave where the boys are trapped.That means waiting it out won’t be an option anymore, and they could be forced to dive out to survive.Mr Allum said the first step would be to take the group for a few laps of the lake at the bottom of the room they’re currently stuck in.”If they can handle that for a period of time, then see how they go before you venture into that overhead environment,” he said.He also said the group would likely be taken out one at a time, and they’d be “closely tethered” to a rescue diver on the trip.”You would perhaps have to take one of the strongest out first as a first run and see how that went,” he said.”If there is any apprehension there I wouldn’t even attempt it.”Unless there is horrendous weather forecast, they can wait, that’s the safest option.”Vice chairman of the British Cave Rescue Council Bill Whitehouse told CNN that restraining the children for the trip could be the safest option.”If they were given breathing apparatuses and then perhaps restrain them, and literally propel them out,” he said. (Facebook: Digitalay)
Mr Mitchell said the trip to get out of the cave takes about three hours for experienced divers.”(It involves) multiple stops, changes of air tanks etcetera. They have got no visual reference,” he said.According to the Bangkok Post, none of the boys know how to swim, so they’ve got hurdles to overcome before strapping an oxygen tank to their backs.Divers from the British Cave Rescue Council have participated in the rescue so far, and its Assistant Chairman Gary Mitchell told the BBC that the cave system is about 10km long.”We are fairly sure that the boys are around 2km into the cave system, of which almost a kilometre of that is through flooded passages … where the water meets the roof,” he said. It’s a slow process,” he said.To dive out of the cave would also be extremely dangerousBig sections of the path out of the cave are extremely narrow, only big enough to fit one person through at a time.The big concern for rescuers is that the boys will panic in the dangerous sections of the three-hour trip out of the cave. Video: 'All you will find is a brown glow in front of you': Cave expert says the boys will have to learn to dive

(ABC News)
Remember, the boys are only between 11 and 16 years old.Mr Allum told RN Breakfast that panic could set in when the boys dive into the strong currents of the floodwaters and feel they’re out of control.”It would be very disconcerting for them to face that situation,” he said.Rescue consultant Pat Moret told CNN they would be faced with “an incredibly hostile situation”.”Hopefully the kids will be so desperate to get out they will grit their teeth and just be able to push through it,” he said.Mr Anupong has said that should anything go wrong during a dive out of the cave, it could be “life-threatening”. (AP: Sakchai Lalit)
ABC/wires
Medics reach boys stranded in Thai cave as rescuers plan next move
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(ABC News) Updated

July 04, 2018 18:23:16

Video: Thai boys in high spirits as rescuers plan next move.
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Thai mothers see footage of their sons trapped underground for 12 days

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Thai soccer team found alive in cave nine days after they went missing
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July 04, 2018 16:07:00

Video: Mothers watch footage of their trapped sons in Thai cave

(ABC News)
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Several mothers of the boys expressed gratitude to the rescuers and said they were looking forward to seeing their sons, who had so far been trapped in the Tham Luang cave complex in Chiang Rai for 12 days.Kian Kamlaung, the mother of 16-year-old Pornchai Kamlaung, said it was like he had been given a new life.All 12 boys and their coach were found alive in the cave where they went missing over a week ago and all were said to be in relatively good health.The boys and the coach were provided high-energy meals and a medical check by the Thai Navy SEAL team who reached them after diving through kilometres of muddy and low-visibility water.A video released by the navy on Facebook shows the boys covered in thermal blankets and chatting in high spirits.The boys, aged 11 to 16, and their 25-year-old coach went missing when flooding trapped them after they entered the cave on June 23. Relatives of the boys and soccer coach trapped in a cave in Thailand, have reacted with delight to new videos of the soccer team greeting them from inside the flooded labyrinth. Video: 'I thought he only had a 50pc chance of survival': Mother of a missing boy reacts to news he's been found

(ABC News)
SEAL commander Rear Admiral Arpakorn Yookongkaew said there was no rush to bring the group out of the cave, since they are safe where they are.While efforts to pump out floodwaters continued, some Thai officials indicated heavy rains forecast for this weekend could force them to decide the boys should swim and dive out using the same complicated route through which their rescuers entered.ABC/Wires Video: Thai soccer team found alive in cave after 9 days missing (Photo: AP)

(ABC News)
Rescuers are now trying to find a way of getting them out safely.The Navy SEAL commander had also said on Tuesday a telephone line was being installed in the cave in order for the boys to communicate with their families.Rescuers now have to decide how best to get the group out in their weakened condition.Options being considered include waiting until water levels subside, or teaching the group to use diving gear to navigate the flooded cave.Diving lessons
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Authorities said the boys were being looked after by seven members of the Thai navy SEALs, including medics, who were staying with them inside the cave.The Thai official overseeing the rescue operation said the boys had been practicing wearing diving masks and breathing.Officials have said teaching the 12 boys and their coach to dive may be the only way to get them out of the cave, but other options were being explored.Chiang Rai provincial Governor Narongsak Osatanakorn said while the team had been practicing with masks, he did not believe they had attempted any practice dives.He said it was unknown when an extraction could be attempted, but it was unlikely to be today.He said any extraction had to be “100 per cent safe”.
Medics reach boys stranded in Thai cave as rescuers plan next move
This is why rescuers aren't teaching the Thai soccer team to dive out of the cave right now