Meghan Trainor – Honey Honey Lyrics

who only want the world
Honey, honey I don’t want your money, money, money But the thought of you got my mind in a mess
So put your lies, put your tries, and your money away
Honey, honey, honey
Don’t wanna pretend that you’ve got money, money, money
And try and be my man
I hate the stupid girls, who only want the world
Honey, honey I don’t want your money, money, money
Stop trying so hard to convince me (me, yeah.)
That you are the one I already see (Already see, woah)
Did you really think that I would judge you more? who only want the world
Honey, honey I don’t want your money, money, money
Honey, honey, honey
Don’t wanna pretend that you’ve got money, money, money
And try and be my man
I hate the stupid girls. Honey, honey, honey
Don’t wanna pretend that you’ve got money, money, money
And try and be my man
I hate the stupid girls who only want the world
Honey, honey I don’t want your money, money, money
Money, money, ma ma ma money
Honey, honey ha ha ha honey
Baby look in my eyes
And know that I’m true, I’m true
Don’t gotta impress nobody but you, but you
Did you really think that I would love you less? Boy, you make my heart fall down to the floor
So put your lies, put your tries, and your words away
Honey, honey, honey
Don’t wanna pretend that you’ve got money, money, money
And try and be my man
I hate the stupid girls who only want the world
Honey, honey I don’t want your money, money, money
No, you know that I hate, the ones who act fake
Cause they think I like it
You say their wrong, been wrong for too long
And I can’t take it
So baby change your ways
Today
Honey, honey, honey
Don’t wanna pretend that you’ve got money, money, money
And try and be my man
I hate the stupid girls. who only want the world
Honey, honey I don’t want your money, money, money
Honey, honey, honey
Don’t wanna pretend that you’ve got money, money, money
And try and be my man
I hate the stupid girls.

King Los – 410 Gang Lyrics

[Intro]
Yeah
Yeah yeah
Uh
Ain’t no city light the city on
What nigga
Check it out look
[Hook]
410 410 410
410 410 410
Ain’t no city light the city on
Ain’t no city light the city on
Westside, eastside, southside
Northside niggas in the house like
410 410 410
410 410 410
Now shawty say she love my swag im in my bag (No cap)
Her nigga want some money don’t know how to act (No cap)
[Verse 1]
Okay, niggas looking silly ima prolly get a billi Im a product of the realest really got us with gorillas
Chilling in front of the building with my niggas in the jects
Lil nigga from the west getting figures in them checks like
Please don’t kill my vibe fuck up my day, yeah
Bullshit to the side fuck out my way, yeah
I hear them talk shit but thats okay
I just made another play a hundred k, yeah
Im from the town, Baltimore city they lay niggas down
I put it down, don’t fuck with no clown
They pushing that white or they flipping that brown no slipping lil nigga be gripping that ground
Convincing me take a lil trip through the town and I hold you down when you get to the
[Hook]
410 410 410
410 410 410
Ain’t no city light the city on
Ain’t no city light the city on
Westside, eastside, southside
Northside niggas in the house like
410 410 410
410 410 410
Now shawty say she love my swag im in my bag (No Cap)
Her nigga want some money don’t know how to act (No cap)
[Verse 2]
Im live and im from the side where they ride or die
A lot of niggas down to spy by the product I
Birthed a lot of niggas, served a lot of niggas
Hurt a lot of niggas, brutalized a nigga, murder lot of niggas
Ooh, I been a good king no cosign
I ain’t never heard no flow like mine
Niggas know I run this shit (On time)
Niggas know I run this bitch (On time)
Ooh keep it cool sure don’t crash slip uh
Chopper hit a nigga make him backflip yeah
I rap for the niggas never had shit ooh
Flew to the city got it back lit ooh
I reached out to every nigga that was building I slid in the dm’s that last made a killing and thats just the greatest muhfuckin feelin
Like hoppin in rarris and dropping the ceiling
Or being from nothing and clocking a million thats gangsta thats gangsta thats gangsta lets get it lets get it
This shit is a banger lets get it make a hundred million and come back and split with a
[Hook]
410 410 410
410 410 410
Ain’t no city light the city on
Ain’t no city light the city on
Westside, eastside, southside
Northside niggas in the house like
410 410 410
410 410 410
Now shawty say she love my swag im in my bag (No Cap)
Her nigga want some money don’t know how to act (No cap)

Bagasse: ‘turning trash to treasure’ and making ‘sugar that much sweeter’

The business of producing sugar takes and makes a lot of energy and produces a huge amount of waste and by-products.”We’re budgeting to crush this year 1.5 million tonne of cane over a 25-week period,” Mark Gayton, Factory Manager of Racecourse Mill in Mackay said.”Typically, on a daily basis we’re processing about 11,000 tonne a day and out of that we’re probably getting 40 per cent fibre so typically we’re producing 1,800 tonne a day of bagasse.”

Bagasse is a by-product of the sugarcane milling process, which in most mills is burnt to generate power to run the factory, and to put out into the grid. (Landline: Courtney Wilson)
Canegrowers are hopeful the research will lead to real-world opportunities for value adding.”It’s extremely important, research is the future,” Joe Muscat, a canegrower from Oakenden in central Queensland, said. “We can put it under high pressure and high temperature for a short period of time, then we release that pressure and the particles, the fibre, explodes and breaks open and so that physical change in the fibre is what improves its usefulness as a feedstock for a whole bunch of processes, including 2G ethanol.”But it’s the potential to enhance the nutritional worth of low-value crop residues that presents opportunities for canegrowers, sugar manufactures and livestock producers.”Our global population is expanding and Australia is really, really well placed to supply animal products to the world. External Link:

Grower of the year finds alternative value-add with cane External Link:

In a typical day at Racecourse Mill in Mackay, the cane crush produces 1,800 tonne of bagasse. (Landline: Courtney Wilson)
“What we want to do is add the probiotics or the enzyme supplements into that so that they start to grow at a faster rate, so that means they’re more productive animals for the farmer and more profitable,” Dr Speight said.”Waste is a massive issue at the moment in society, it’s very much on peoples’ minds. Photo:
“A sugarcane bagasse feed can still be challenging to digest and get all those nutrients out, so if you just feed that they might not grow as quickly,” Dr Speight said. For industry it very much comes down to the economics.”Everyone wants to make as much profit and as much money as a business as you can so any opportunity to take something coming out as a waste — either as a cost, or low value co-product — if we can turn that into something of high value with an economic process — that’s more money for the business.”

Photo:
Bagasse is already of use in sugar factories: it is burnt to produce power to run the plant. Photo:
“Our input costs are always increasing — electricity, water, fuel, insurances, so we’ve got to find ways to manage that and be able to keep a profitable business,” Joe Muscat (R) said. (Landline: Courtney Wilson)
To turn bagasse into something nutritionally beneficial for livestock — like cattle, pigs and poultry — it needs to be made more digestible.Scientists at the Mackay Renewable Biocommodities Pilot Plant are using elevated heat to break apart the bagasse, so the sugars it contains are more accessible for the animal that’s eventually going to eat it. (Landline: Courtney Wilson)
“Without good research we’re really going to be left behind.”You know bagasse is the waste stream of that processing, if we can add value to that waste stream, it certainly has a huge impact on the profitability of the business so I think it’s terribly important.”Large-scale trials of the bagasse-based animal feed are the next big goal.Learn more about the future of bagasse on Landline this Sunday at 12.30. But to do that we need more feed,” Dr Harrison said.”A lot of the current ingredients we have in feed are some of the ingredients that we put in human food, so if we want to increase our animal production capacity here in Australia, we need to think very carefully about what we’re feeding those animals.””We need to look to residues and by-products from agricultural systems that are available at central locations like sugar mills, as potential feed additives, potential feed ingredients.”Improving the nutritional quality of bagasseAt the Queensland University of Technology’s Brisbane labs, Associate Professor Dr Robert Speight leads a team working to further improve the nutrition qualities of bagasse.The scientists have looked at raw bagasse, and what organisms already grow in it naturally, and used that information to develop probiotics to help make the bagasse more nutritious. But scientists are looking at ways of turning sugar cane bagasse and trash into valuable animal feed.”Elsewhere around the world, we know that cattle production often goes hand in hand with sugar mills,” QUT Senior Research Fellow Dr Mark Harrison said.”We know that sugar mills are already providing molasses into the cattle feed industry, and bagasse is another opportunity to have the sugar cane industry supply ingredients for cattle feed.”

Photo:
Treated bagasse could be an alternative to hay, which has escalated in price and would also provide an alternative income for canegrowers.
Map:
Australia
Feed costs escalate as drought lengthens and more crops fail
Landline

By Courtney Wilson

Updated

July 28, 2018 05:34:45

Photo:
Bagasse (leftover fibres from cane crushing) can be turned into biofuels and feed for livestock, providing canegrowers a value-add revenue stream.

Related Story:
Farmers turn to fruit to keep cattle alive during drought
Related Story:

Buskers attuned to changing times trial tap-and-go payments

PIN blunder sees man accidentally pay $29,300 for two steamed buns
(Supplied: Socialise Photo) ABC Radio Melbourne

By Nicole Mills

Posted

July 28, 2018 08:00:09

Photo:
Jessica Paige had to move spots to find older audiences who still carry cash.
Related Story:
The true cost of 'tap and go' may surprise you
Map:
Melbourne 3000
Related Story:
A trial of tap-and-go payment systems is being rolled out by 15 street performers across Melbourne.Appreciative audiences will be able to tap their credit cards on portable payment devices for a set amount of $2 or $5 — or more if they wish.The trial also offers the option to pay with Alipay, a smartphone payment method used by many Chinese tourists. “So it does happen, but it’s a small percentage at this point.”He said busking in the CBD meant cash was never far away. Generally, the answer to that is there’s a teller machine about 20 metres that way. “You get, particularly the younger demographic, occasionally they might do the old pat the pockets and give you a bit of a shrug like they’re letting you know that, ‘Hey, I might have chucked something in but I don’t carry cash’. “I’ve had people say, ‘I’d buy your CD but I don’t have any cash on me’. “I’ve been going a bit further abroad to where there’s more older people who don’t use paypass for everything.”I’ve been going to the older suburbs, but I’m hoping to be able to hit the city more now.”

Photo:
More than 870 million people use Alipay, a related company of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba. (Facebook: Mark Holroyd)
He said getting set up with a QR code was simple.”I don’t think there’s a limitation for anyone — anyone could get one, anyone could apply for one, anyone could start up.”Mr Richardson has been busking full-time for about a decade and said he was starting to notice fewer people carrying cash.”It’s the early days I think,” he said. If it’s successful, it could be rolled out for street performers across Australia.Tip of the icebergDan Richardson began the trial this week and said it opened up a whole new audience.”As I understand it, in China these days you don’t leave home with a wallet, you just have your keys and your phone,” he told ABC Melbourne’s Richelle Hunt.”If you want to buy something from a vendor they have a little QR code, which is sort of like a barcode, and you can scan it with your phone and pay for whatever you want.”

Photo:
Dan Richardson is part of a trial using tap-and-go and phone payment platforms. “They might need to latch on to the idea.”Luke Fuller from Quest, the company enabling the tap-and-go component of the trial, said while many businesses were thriving with the shift to digital payments, there were pockets of society that had been left behind.”The busking community is one of them,” he said.”This program is about levelling the playing field for buskers and giving them every opportunity to continue doing what they love — entertaining.” (Supplied: Socialise Photo)
Before the trial she had been investigating alternate payment systems, and even considered buying a portable payment device designed for charities.But that required an investment of $800.She’s hoping the combination of a tap-and-go system and the QR code linked to Alipay will help generate more income.”I’m hoping that people are going to donate a lot, but I guess we’ll see,” she said. The pilot program will run for up to six weeks in order to get feedback from buskers, who will pay a 1 per cent fee on every transaction. The days of buskers laying out an empty guitar case or a battered hat in the hope of attracting some spare change could be numbered. “So I don’t think the barriers have been too huge but I think it’s the start.”It’s the tip of the iceberg and at some point in the future I think there’ll be less and less cash going around.”‘I guess we’ll see’Jessica Page has been busking for 17 years and said she had seen a significant decline in revenue, particularly among younger people in the CBD.She said she now made about 20 per cent of what she used to from busking in the city.”At the moment it’s the worst it’s ever been,” she told ABC Darwin’s Liz Trevaskis.

Crunching census data creates coded chocolate that’s a true taste of Sydney

(Supplied: Jenifer Lo) ABC Radio Sydney

By Harriet Tatham

Updated

July 28, 2018 10:28:01

Photo:
Jenifer Lo helped crunch census data and bring Sydney’s ancestries to people’s tastebuds.
“I think it’s so cool to have a physical representation of greater Sydney,” she said. For the past year, Sydney data visualiser Jack Zhao has worked with chocolatier Jenifer Lo to embed Sydney’s ancestries into small chocolate squares. The project, titled Not a Single Origin, began when Mr Zhao decided he wanted to use his skills to communicate across a different medium.”We’ve always worked with data; trying to use data to tell stories about people, about places, and we produced many projects that did this, but only on screens, mobile devices and on paper,” he said. (Supplied: Jenifer Lo) “There was a motivation to go beyond the pixels and use a different medium to communicate, to tell the stories about people of Australia using data.”

Photo:
The 12 chocolates were designed to tell a story about Sydney’s multicultural groups. Photo:
Jenifer Lo made the career change from designer to chocolatier around two-and-a-half years ago. (Supplied: Hilary Cam Photography)
With this in mind, Mr Zhao approached Ms Lo, a designer-cum-Instagram-famous baker and chocolatier. “With Italy, we had strawberry, balsamic and liquorice. A collaboration between a coder and a chocolatier has confirmed that life really is like a box of chocolates. to draw local streets from each suburb to the surface of the chocolate.” Ms Lo said visualising the suburbs enabled a conversation to emerge about Sydney’s makeup. “For me, I was never familiar with those cuisines, so that was very interesting, finding out that almond and orange were quite predominant in their culture and desserts.”

Photo:
The chocolates were validated by focus groups asked if they could associate the tastes with the corresponding ancestries. “We had ones that were a little bit more challenging like Malta and Macedonia. While both knew the project wouldn’t be profitable with plans to manufacture no more than 50 boxes of chocolate, Ms Lo said she was unable to resist the opportunity to combine code and confectionary. (Supplied: Not A Single Origin)
What do Sydney’s suburbs look like?With the flavours set, the final step for the team was to create moulds that would enable those eating the chocolate to visualise the suburbs. “It starts a discussion, which I think is really interesting: What would our suburb taste like?”While the 50 boxes of chocolate have already been sold, Mr Zhao said the team would consider a second run. “The whole intention of the project is to use something tangible and edible to communicate data, to help people visualise what their city is like,” Mr Zhao said.”Taste alone is not enough and we wanted something tactile, so that’s where the 3D printing came to the project … “We looked into the different ethnicities and the predominant flavours in each of those countries, what were the most commonly used ingredients, what were natives to those countries, and then found ways to pair those with chocolate that were very complementary,” she said. The sweetest suburbsWestmead (Indian) — cardamom, coconut, cashewConcord (Italian) — strawberry, balsamic, caramel, orelysEarlwood (Greek) — ouzo, lemon, aniseGreenacre (Lebanese) — date, rosewater, pistachioHurstville (Chinese) — red bean, coconut, mandarinLondonderry (Maltese) — orange, cinnamon, almondManly (Scottish) — scotch whisky, toffeeMosman (English) — marmalade, almondRandwick (Irish) — Baileys, coffee, honeycombRooty Hill (Filipino) — taro, coconut, sesameBanksia (Macedonian) — honey, peach, rhubarbCabramatta (Vietnamese) — caramel, banana, coffee, peanut
Sydney’s ancestriesThe first step of the project for Mr Zhao and his team was to decide which data they were going to visualise.”Through our work we’re very familiar with census data, and the 2016 data has just been released,” he said. Photo:
Jack Zhao, director of Small Multiples, works to tell stories with data. (ABC Sydney: Harriet Tatham)
What does ancestry taste like?With the 12 ancestries and suburbs confirmed, Ms Lo was then brought in to help establish which flavours could be used in each chocolate. “We decided to look at ancestry, instead of languages or country of birth, because we think ancestry speaks more of where you are.”So the team downloaded the Bureau of Statistics data, created a formula, and then generated a list of the most representative ancestries for the greater Sydney area.”With yet another formula, suburbs were ranked on their weighted ancestry value and the first 12 were selected.
Map:
Sydney 2000

Master clock maker still having the time of his life

Map:
Perth 6000
(ABC Radio Perth: Glynn Greensmith) ABC Radio Perth

By Gillian O’Shaughnessy

Updated

July 29, 2018 14:54:50

Photo:
Guenter Best’s passion is for mechanical clocks, from grandfathers to pocket watches.

A master of his clock-making craft

(WA Afternoons)
Photo:
The 79-year-old says he has no intention of retiring. He is one of the country’s few masters of clockmaking, a career he began in Germany when he was 15. (ABC Radio Perth: Glynn Greensmith)
“I was born in 1939 and my dad never came back from the war,” Mr Best told ABC Radio Perth’s Gillian O’Shaughnessy.”My dad was a teacher, and tradition determined I should be a teacher, and I decided no.”A friend of my dad had a jeweller’s and watch-making shop and he took me on and I learned to be a jeweller and then a watch maker.”I finished my apprenticeship and then I enrolled in a school for watch making masters and I got my master’s degree.” The German-born master craftsman moved to Australia in 1970 and has taken his skills to clocktowers across the city, as well as restoring grand heirloom grandfather clocks and intricate fob watches. In a small home workshop in Perth’s eastern suburbs, 79-year-old Guenter Best is keeping the craft of watch and clock making alive.
“I said, ‘No way, my dad never came back from the war’, and I went to Switzerland.”Climbing clocktowersIn Switzerland he worked for watch makers including Rolex and travelled all over Europe, climbing tall, steep clocktowers to repair the mechanisms behind the faces.”Mostly we had to make new bearings because the weights on those old clocks are very heavy and the wheels wear out,” Mr Best said. (ABC Radio Perth: Glynn Greensmith)
Mr Best and teaching colleague Nino Sardi take students through all aspects of clock and watch repair, including battery-operated quartz watches, but his passion is for mechanical clocks, from large grandfather clocks to intricate pocket watches. “There is fine engineering in our trade. “Those bearings were brass and you need big lathes to do it, and then to put the bearing in those plates, you needed a hammer. “It is a traditional turned clock,” Mr Best said.”Those clocks are all over the world in churches and important buildings; this clock is a very good replica of Big Ben.”

Photo:
Mr Best has worked on the London Court clock. “Anything mechanical I like,” Mr Best said.”They are heirlooms, something special you get for your wife, inherit from your grandfather or father, and they need service. “You have to polish the pivots on the wheels and then make new bearings. “It was really a skill which you learned on big clocks and later on I was able to do it for little clocks.”

Photo:
The lathe is one of the tools of the trade. You see the wheels turning, you see the balance regulating the time.”‘Just like Big Ben’His latest project is a $10,000 restoration of the clock in the tower of Guildford’s old post office building.His students are also involved and the work is expected to take until the end of the year. The first group of five graduated in 2015 — four are now working in the industry — and it now has 36 students. “I decided to start a school on my own.”He started by teaching at TAFE and in 2011 the MCAWA began offering its own three-year training program. (ABC Radio Perth: Glynn Greensmith)
When he emigrated Down Under, Mr Best was offered a number of jobs but decided he would only work from home and set up his workshop. He still cycles daily to keep fit enough to climb clocktowers and he loves teaching.”I like to make sure that our trades go to the next generations.” When Mr Best was called up to do military service that was compulsory for young men in West Germany, he made his next move. Photo:
He has been a watchmaker since he was 15. “When I arrived here I was a shy young bachelor and Perth was good to me.”As well as repairing clocks and watches, he became very involved with the Master Clock and Watch Makers of Western Australia (MCAWA) and was determined to pass on his skills to a younger generation.A school for new masters”When I arrived in 1970 I had worked for Rolex and I had done my master’s degree in Germany and there was nothing here in Perth. (ABC Radio Perth: Emma Wynne)
Despite his age, Mr Best said he had no plans to retire but might consider it in 20 years. “Pieces like that, they are beautiful to work on.
Audio: