Cody Johnson – On My Way To You lyrics

[Verse 1]
All the boats I’ve missed
All the hell I’ve caused
All the lips I’ve kissed
All the love I’ve lost
I got kicked around
I’ve been black and blue
On my way to you
All the stars I’ve seen
All the songs I’ve sung
All the beers I’ve drank
All the damage done
I was just passin’ time
Kinda just passin’ through
On my way to you
[Chorus]
Every curve, every ditch
Every turn, every bridge
I left behind me up in smoke
Every fork in the road
It was all worth the while
When I finally saw your smile
Every highway, every heartbreak
Every mountain, every mile
[Verse 2]
I got the radio up
Sun is going down
I’ll take a left at the bank
And I’ll head straight through town
So baby put on that dress
A little sweet perfume
‘Cause I’m on my way to you
[Chorus]
Yeah every curve, every ditch
Every turn, every bridge
I left behind me up in smoke
Every fork in the road
It was all worth the while
When I finally saw your smile
Every highway, every heartbreak
Every mountain, every mile
[Outro]
All the boats I’ve missed
All the hell I’ve caused
All the lips I’ve kissed
All the love I’ve lost
I thank God for that
I guess he always knew
I was on my way to you
On my way to you
On my way to you

Kanye West – XTCY Lyrics

I got four of them
Damn, those is your sisters
You did something unholy to them pictures
Damn, you need to be locked up
Nah, we need a bigger hot tub
[Chorus]
Now let me see you back, back, back, back
Time to get the bag, bag, bag, bag
We don’t throw stones, we throw stacks
That’s why they’re going mad, mad, mad, Max
If you don’t say your name then I won’t ask
She got a smartphone but a dumb ass
I thought of all this on ecstasy
[Verse 2]
You got sick thoughts? I escorted them (scooty-woot!)
While y’all was trippin’, I resorted them (whoop!)
Then I kicked ’em out, I got bored of them (whoop!)
[Chorus]
Now let me see you back, back, back, back
It’s time to get the bag, bag, bag, bag
We don’t throw stones, we throw stacks
That’s why they’re going mad, mad, mad, Max
If you don’t say your name then I won’t ask
You got a smartphone but a dumb ass
I thought of all this on ecstasy (skrt!)
You see them escorts? I recorded them
She said fuck weed, cause she love X
If she suck seed, that’s a success
If a girl cum, that’s a fuck fest
And we gon’ score 100 on this drug test
[Chorus]
Now let me see you back, back, back, back
It’s time to get the bag, bag, bag, bag
We don’t throw stones, we throw stacks
That’s why they’re going mad, mad, mad, Max
If you don’t say your name then I won’t ask
You got a smartphone but a dumb ass
I thought of all this on Ecstasy (perfect!)
[Interlude]
Fuckin’ around – whoop! Whoopity-whoop
Whoopity-whoop, scoop-poop-woop-toop
Scoopity-whoop loot, looty-whoop-whoop
Ecstasy, ecstasy, ecstasy
[Verse 3]
You got sick thoughts? I got more of them
Han? I got more of ’em
You got a sister-in-law you would smash? I got more of them
You remember bad bitches that you smashed? [Intro]
I want you to come to me, Ecstasy
Uh, Ecstasy, Ecstasy, Ecstasy
Ecstasy, Ecstasy, Ecstasy
Ecstasy, Ecstasy, Ecstasy
Ecstasy, Ecstasy, Ecstasy
Ecstasy
[Verse 1]
You got sick thoughts? Scoop!

After 100 games and one win most footballers would give up, but not Jake Stuart

ABC Great Southern

By Ellie Honeybone

Posted

August 12, 2018 06:15:00

Photo:
Jake Stuart is as dedicated as ever to the Albany Sharks – despite the league team only recording one win since their inaugural season in 2012. (ABC Great Southern: Ellie Honeybone)
Map:
Albany 6330
They told him to learn how to lose before he could learn how to win and that has certainly been the reality for Jake Stuart.The West Australian footballer will become the Albany Sharks’ first league player to reach 100 games today, with just one lone victory along the way. Photo:
Jake Stuart in action for the Sharks. (Supplied: Jake Stuart)
While most country football teams are accustomed to winning, that one fateful victory was treated as a premiership for the Albany Sharks.”There was a lot of emotion that day, fans stormed the field and it was pretty insane,” Stuart said.”Amongst all the ups and downs we had this historic moment.”That is one of the main things I try to impart with the younger guys at the club — stick with it.”During this season we have really started to create a winning mentality.”A lot of people say you have to learn to be able to lose before you can learn how to win and we certainly have done that.”Searching for that second winAll the pieces are there, and Stuart believes it is just a matter of getting it together for four full quarters of footy.”We get ahead of ourselves if we get in front and we have lost games in the second half during the last few weeks,” he said.”I think another win is not far off but it probably won’t be this week.”For his milestone game, Stuart just hopes to make it through without another injury.”I am really looking forward to it, but I don’t want to put too much pressure on it because at the end of the day, it’s just another game of footy,” he said.”I think it’s just really important we just enjoy ourselves and get to crack a beer together at the end of the day.”While another victory is a goal for the club veteran, he is realistic about his chances of a premiership.”If one day I could be sitting in the grandstands watching the young guys I coached come through and win a premiership — that would be end goal for me,” Stuart said. Sharks president Geoff Oldfield is hoping the boys will recognise the dedication it takes to reach 100 games when they run out for this afternoon.”Stuart is a good boy,” he said.”He has stuck with the club through thick and thin.”Not many players would have hung around for this long with only one win.”Hopefully the boys perform accordingly, and show their appreciation during the game.”Mr Oldfield believes the Sharks are only three or four quality players away from being right up there with the rest of the league.”We have great junior sides, we’ve won premierships with our under 16 team,” he said.”At the end of the day, we have a pretty bright future and Albany needs the Sharks.”If it weren’t for us, there would be 100 young men unable to play footy each week and that would be a sad reality.”Victory day

Photo:
Jake Stuart celebrates with his teammates after the Albany Sharks one league victory in 2015. (ABC Great Southern: Ellie Honeybone)
Since the Sharks inaugural season in 2012, Stuart has only ever missed three games.He previously lived in Perth and said back then he could not commit to training or the lifestyle that came with football.”I only played one season up there and then I took a bit of a sabbatical,” he said.”It was one of my biggest regrets — the sense of community and mateship that you get with country football is like nothing else and once you let it go, its really hard to find again.”Stuart’s dad was a foundation member of the Sharks club so after he moved down to Albany, the decision of which team to play for was a pretty easy to make.”There’s no big secret to playing so many games, you have to just play through injuries and don’t let your body tell you otherwise,” he said.”There was only a couple of times, regardless of the amount of strapping on my knee and how adamant I was that I was going to play, that the decision to rest was made for me.”It just takes resilience, that’s all I can tell you.”Creating culture during a losing streakStuart said the Sharks league team started out as the scraps of the Great Southern Football League. (Supplied: Jake Stuart)
“There were very few of us that were committed, and a lot of guys were doubling up, playing two games every week just to get the league and reserves sides on the field,” he said.”These days we’ve moved away from that culture, but we are still always looking to recruit more and offer people an opportunity to come play footy.”It takes full commitment and it’s a long season so the weaker minded have fallen by the wayside and the ones that are here are the kind of guys you really playing by your side.”Along with his position on the league side, Stuart also coaches the under 14 side and often arrives at training an hour early to help with the colts. Photo:
Jake Stuart hopes to add another 50 games to his record with the Albany Sharks. (ABC Great Southern: Ellie Honeybone) While his team’s lack of success would surely be enough to scare off most prospective players, Stuart’s dedication has never faltered.”This milestone is a sign of maturity for us as a club,” he said.”We only played our 100th game as a group a couple of weeks ago so this is a real stepping stone towards becoming a legitimate team in this town.”We are not the new guys on the block anymore and we’ve really started to be competitive, not just on the scoreboard.”Twenty-eight year-old Stuart said the gratification that comes with building a football club from scratch was worth far more than any immediate success.”A trade is not something I ever considered,” he said.”I have had the talk with a couple of people from other clubs and they have always said they would never want to take me away from the Sharks.”It takes a special person to be able to lose and keep focused on the long-term, big-picture goals, and I think I’m perfectly equipped for it.”It has never crossed my mind to play for anyone else.”Resilience is the key

Photo:
Jake Stuart is the first Albany Sharks league player to reach the 100 game milestone.

Stolen surfboard makes its way back home 40 years on

ABC South West WA

By

Anthony Pancia

and

Damien Larkins

Posted

August 12, 2018 12:17:35

Video: A surfboard stolen more than 40 years ago has been reunited with its original owner

(ABC News)
Map:
Margaret River 6285
Every surfer remembers that first board and pretty much everyone would do anything to get it back again.”Board now a family keepsakeMr Gilson was finally reunited with his beloved board courtesy of Mr Gibson, who had flown over to compete at a national longboard championship at Cabarita Beach, on the NSW north coast. It was just too much of a feel-good story not too.”Vintage Surfboard Collector site administrator Lee Murphy said the gesture was not uncommon, but always a bonus given vintage boards can fetch a premium price.”There are a lot of collectors out there looking for their first surfboard as they hold a lot of sentimental attachment,” Mr Murphy said.”Generally a surfer’s first board will have come from a family member or they’ve worked long and hard to save up for it. Photo:
Peter’s old photo of the board convinced its new owner he was the original owner (Source: Peter Gilson)
Mr Gilson emailed the owners of the gallery and managed to convince them of his connection with a historic photo showing the board and a nephew.”His story all added up but the emotional backstory pretty moved us all to tears,” Mr Gibson said.”Ultimately it was Mick’s call, but he agreed to hand it back free of charge, which was a great gesture. Photo:
Bill Gibson flew to northern NSW to return the board to Peter Gilson (ABC Local: Damien Larkins)
While admitting to being “a bit too big to ride it now,” Mr Gilson said it would instead remain in his family’s possession for eternity.”It looks just like I remember,” Mr Gilson said as he held the board for the first time in more than four decades.”It’ll go up on the wall, along with a picture of my mum.” I sat bolt upright in bed when I saw it and a whole range of emotions came flooding through.”Though the board had probably passed through many sets of hands over the years, its new owner, West Australian surfer Mick Ray had given the board to curator of the WA Surf Gallery, Bill Gibson to restore and display. A chance sighting online has led to a surfer being reunited with a board that had been stolen from his mother’s garage 40 years ago.Peter Gilson was gifted the board by his mother, who had secretly scrimped and saved the equivalent of approximatley $1,800 in the late ’70s from a store in Newcastle.”I only had it for about a year and it got pinched from the garage with a bunch of other things,” Mr Gilson said.”To be honest, at the time, being a young kid, I didn’t really give it too much thought but as the years went by it occurred to me how much of a sacrifice my mum had made to get me that board.”Distinctively illustrated boardForty years on while recovering from the side-effects of treatment for cancer, Mr Gilson began repairing vintage surfboards, joining Victorian-based Facebook site, Vintage Surfboard Collectors, dedicated to such craft in the process.One evening, while perusing a gallery of old boards on the Facebook site, Mr Gilson said he “nearly jumped right out of bed,” when he spotted the distinctively illustrated board in the WA Surf Gallery, located near Margaret River, Western Australia.”Some guy had been through the gallery and took a bunch of photos,” Mr Gilson said.”But by luck, of all the boards there, he’d singled mine out and taken a photo of it.

Black sesame seed crop proves drought resistant during central Queensland’s warmest summer

So a more commercial level instead … and from then on we’ll start connecting buyers and food processing companies to add value to the industry and direct exports from CQ,” she said.While the first harvest had a lot of interest, there is still a long way to go before black sesame is grown and sold widely in Australia, let alone overseas.This year’s harvest will be used to test quality and seed next year’s crop. “We can take them to Turkey and produce them for our market, our neighbouring countries, but also continue producing here as we are close to the biggest market like China and India,” Ali Tetik from Turkey said.”It may be a good opportunity for us to produce here and export to those countries as well.”

Photo:
The black sesame seed trial has drawn the attention of local and international investors. (Supplied: Young Beamish)
Crop grew in QLD’s warmest summer on recordPeter Foxwell is a dry land farmer at Alton Downs, west of Rockhampton.He grows a range of crops without irrigation, relying just on rain.”Black sesame was suggested as a possible alternative crop to what we do here, they thought it would suit the area, the black soil the climate and the rainfall,” Mr Foxwell said.The trial saw 12 black sesame seed varieties planted on 16 hectares of Mr Foxwell’s property in February and it was harvested in June. Australians are one step closer to seeing locally grown black sesame oil and ice cream products on supermarket shelves, with the first commercial crop harvested in Queensland.Australia currently imports all of its black sesame. Photo:
Black sesame is now a popular flavour of ice cream. “Five days of 40 degrees plus [heat] as it was just coming out of the ground,” Mr Foxwell said.”We had one day which was 41.1 [degrees] which is the hottest February day since 1969 I think for Rockhampton. This poor sesame was struggling through and I thought that was the end of it.”Dr Surya Bhattarai is a university researcher involved in the trial.He said despite very little rainfall, the crop performed extremely well.”To our surprise and the surprise of the growers we have been able to see a very attractive crop,” he said.”This crop has proven to be drought tolerant … (Supplied: CQ University)
Last summer was Queensland’s warmest on record and only 120 millimetres of rain fell on the crop. Photo:
Peter Foxwell with his newly planted black sesame crop. (Supplied: Rockhampton Regional Council)
Rockhampton Regional Council’s senior executive of trade and investment said the success of the trial could see central Queensland become Australia’s home to black sesame production for both the domestic and international market.”From here we’re actually expanding the trial. which would tend to indicate to me that people are willing to give it a go.”I’d say probably most of them would be keen for me to have a second year and see if it’s a success again in the second year, then they might have a crack.”There’s a lot of excitement around the region.”You can see the story on Landline on ABC TV or on iview. this gives an opportunity to harness the option of drought tolerant crops for our region.”

Photo:
Scientist Surya Bhattarai is passionate about finding strong plant varieties for central Queensland’s climate. The seed is grown in the driest parts of India and scientists say it is one of the most drought tolerant crops in the world.That is why a central Queensland farmer has teamed up with university researchers, a specialised seed company, and the local council to grow the first Australian commercial crop of black sesame seed. Photo:
The black sesame seed crop ready for harvest at Alton Downs. (ABC Capricornia: Rachel McGhee)
“A tonne of seed would be able to plant about 1,000 acres of black sesame. It creates an enormous potential very quickly,” Mr Foxwell said.”There’s been some discussion since … It is mainly used for oil but it can also be used for food flavouring, cosmetics, and is claimed to have health benefits. (Amy McCosker)
On average one hectare can produce 4.5 tonnes of seed and up to 60 per cent of its weight in oil.Black sesame is valued at $1,600 per tonne and it is considered a high value crop.”The price difference between standard sesame oil and black sesame is about five fold,” Dr Bhattarai said.The trial also involved specialised seed company AgriVentis Technologies.The company wants to develop plants with higher yields, disease resistance and lower water requirements without using genetic modification technology.”Australian farmers and growers are not normally gamblers,” the company’s head of research and development Paul Stewart said.”If they can count upon something that’s a good partnership with them to grow to ensure how they can turn their business into a profitable business they’re going to grow to rely upon that.”International interest in locally grown productThe hope is that the Australian seed is as good as anything grown elsewhere around the world, with the aim to export it.A group of European representatives looking at agricultural opportunities in Australia is interested in Australia’s black sesame seed.
Map:
Rockhampton 4700
Landline

By Rachel McGhee

Updated

August 12, 2018 13:28:51

Photo:
The trial saw 12 black sesame seed varieties planted. (ABC Capricornia: Rachel McGhee)