Young Thug – Chanel (Go Get It) Lyrics

[Intro: Gunna & Future]
Anything she want she can get
Anything she want she can get
Anything she want she can get
Wheezy outta here
[Chorus: Young Thug]
She want Chanel, go get it, she want Chanel, go get it
She want this Fendi, go get it, she want a Birkin, go get it
She want this Gucci, she get it, she want this Louis, go get it
Loubs with the spikes, she get it, everything I got, she gettin’ it, yeah
Bentley sedan, she get it, hop out the Benz, she gettin’ it
Hop out the Lamb, she gettin’ it, the Porsche Cayenne, she gettin’ it
Hop out the coupe, she get it, shine to the shoes, she get it
I put my kids on her titty, anything she want she can get it
[Verse 1: Gunna]
Anything you see, you can get it
Here go the keys to the Bentley
When I fuck her, I got good intentions
I just can’t get my palms to stop itchin’
Water on me like I live with the fishes
I done ordered every color in tennis
Got the diamonds put in by my dentist
I’ma shine when I’m skinnin’ and grinnin’
Ice my watch, I’m not wastin’ my time
Gunna dripping with Uzi and Slime
Connect with my bitch like WiFi
I’m in the DM like Cha Cha
I got Ms, I can take care of the southside
I’ve been bettin’ the billionaire ties
Got the Yves Saint Laurent heels in your size
Get the penthouse and fill it with vibes
Got Marc Jacobs, they cover my eyes
She need help, I’ma send her a dime
I can’t pour nothing less than two lines
[?] the back seat reclines
She want me to put that dick in her spine
Take her shoppin’ and keep her from cryin’
Give you stones you one of a kind
Got Chanel with the C’s on both sides
[Chorus: Young Thug]
She want Chanel, go get it, she want Chanel, go get it
She want this Fendi, go get it, she want a Birkin, go get it
She want this Gucci, she get it, she want this Louis, go get it
Loubs with the spikes, she get it, everything I got, she gettin’ it, yeah
Bentley sedan, she get it, hop out the Benz, she gettin’ it
Hop out the Lamb, she gettin’ it, the Porsche Cayenne, she gettin’ it
Hop out the coupe, she get it, shine to the shoes, she get it
I put my kids on her titty, anything she want she can get it
[Verse 2: Lil Baby]
They locked the door when we walk in Fendi
Save the 100’s, them dubs, we spendin’
Real dope boy, ain’t chargin’ no card
New G-Wagon, she already got
Real grown woman, she ain’t post her body
Check price tags, you want it, you get it
You a big Thugger fan, he scared to admit it
Gettin’ six for a show, I’m handlin’ business
LA for a month, get away from the city
Been sippin’ this syrup, I’ma need a new kidney
Just tell me where it’s at and I’ma go in and get it
‘Ever I say, she on it
New Range Rover, she want it
We don’t do “no,” she on it
Runnin’ out of space for the bags in her closet
Runnin’ through checks every day, no fraud shit
Rose gold Presidential Rollie look polished
Bad lil’ bitch, good brain go to college
You ain’t really gotta pay for nothing, I got it
Big bankroll, I ain’t totin’ no wallet
I don’t withdraw, nigga, name deposit
T-Pain, Plies, I call up my shawty, my shawty
[Chorus: Young Thug & Lil Baby]
She want Chanel, go get it (she want Chanel, go get it)
She want Chanel, go get it (go get it)
She want this Fendi, go get it, she want a Birkin, go get it
She want this Gucci, she get it, she want this Louis, go get it
Loubs with the spikes, she get it, everything I got, she gettin’ it, yeah
Bentley sedan, she get it, hop out the Benz, she gettin’ it
Hop out the Lamb, she gettin’ it, the Porsche Cayenne, she gettin’ it
Hop out the coupe, she get it, shine to the shoes, she get it
I put my kids on her titty, anything she want she can get it

Young Thug – Oh Yeah Lyrics

[Intro: Young Thug]
All I said is for you to keep it real, each and every day
Aww, darling, yeah
[Chorus: Young Thug]
Plain Jane AP with a Cuban link to match it
Diamonds on me dancin’, got me lookin’ like Michael Jackson
I don’t want you dead, that’s that Fed talk
Most these niggas polices like Matlock
Armani the jeans, Gucci shirt on, color my spleen
I can’t get enough of codeine
If you make me stop, you know you’ll owe me
Good pussy, good money, good genes
I just wanna show you love
I’m the one that got you Frank Chesters
I don’t want the time to be up, yeah
I don’t wanna find new love
Like a G4, like a G5, you get fly-y-y
You a real one, such a real one, oh my, my, my
Never stop, it’s always go
Send me nudes when I’m on the road
Send me nudes when I’m on the road, baby
Watch ’em before and after the show baby
Your body shaped just like a Coke, baby
But you already know
K Bangerz
[Refrain: Young Thug & Hi Doraah]
Yeah, oh yeah (yeah)
Oh yeah (yeah)
Yea-ea-ea-eah
Yea-ea-ea-eah
[Verse: Hi Doraah]
I just went and bossed you up and your whole damn team (team)
Put you in designer, Christian Dior and McQueen (Queen)
Selfish ’cause I want you to hold it down with me (me)
Hold me down ’til the very end, a unity
How you feelin’? Know you got a lucky one like me (me)
Take you from that dirty, made you who wanna be (yeah)
Survival of the fittest, had no choice, become a G (G)
It’s good to know that you can make it up up out them streets
You a star babe
[Chorus: Young Thug]
Plain Jane AP with a Cuban link to match it
Diamonds on me dancin’, got me lookin’ like Michael Jackson
I don’t want you dead, that’s that Fed talk
Most these niggas polices like Matlock
Armani the jeans, Gucci shirt on, color my spleen
I can’t get enough of codeine
If you make me stop, you know you’ll owe me
Good pussy, good money, good genes
I just wanna show you love
I’m the one that got you Frank Chesters
I don’t want the time to be up, yeah
I don’t wanna find new love
Like a G4, like a G5, you get fly-y-y
You a real one, such a real one, oh my, my, my
Never stop, it’s always go
Send me nudes when I’m on the road
Send me nudes when I’m on the road, baby
Watch ’em before and after the show baby
Your body shaped just like a Coke, baby
But you already know
[Refrain: Young Thug & Hi Doraah]
Yeah, oh yeah (yeah)
Oh yeah (yeah)
Yea-ea-ea-eah
Yea-ea-ea-eah
K Bangerz

Young Thug – Scoliosis Lyrics

[Intro: Young Thug]
Yeah, drink this cum, bitch getting pumped (woo)
Black bitch, Keke Palmer (black bitch)
Yeah, pray for a lifetime when you bond us (SEX)
Yeah yeah, real slow when I pump her (woo woo)
[Chorus: Young Thug]
Maserati coupe, it’s a sedan in the garage (skrrt)
[?] all white gold, I’m no fraud (yeah)
Scoliosis, pink face Rollies with the chart
Pine-Sol, diamonds clean, livin’ large
High school, had a bomb in my [?]
Middle school, had that TEC in my locker
I ain’t had to run from the principal (no sir)
I did it because the principle
[Verse 1: Young Thug]
I’ma dance, I was sexin yo’ mama (woo)
Nigga we smoked ’em, we don’t care ’bout no karma
All the homies are protected like Obama (woo woo)
Ancient gold Rolex like a condom (yeah)
Rolls gold, six froze on the Tonka (yeah)
Rolls gold, six by fours on the Tonka (yeah yeah)
Twelve colors on my clothes like a [?] (and what)
Twelve million to my hoe, she humongous (woo woo)
[Chorus: Young Thug]
Maserati coupe, it’s a sedan in the garage (skrrt)
[?] all white gold, I’m no fraud (yeah)
Scoliosis, pink face Rollies with the chart
Pine-Sol, diamonds clean, livin’ large
High school, had a bomb in my [?]
Middle school, had that TEC in my locker (tec)
I ain’t had to run from the principal (no)
I did it because the principle
[Verse 2: Gunna]
Wide body benz with a big nose
Amazon bitch was in some white toes (let’s go)
She got extravagant head, know that deepthroat (deepthroat)
YSL, I’m only ’bout that lingo
That’s the beauty of it, sell some then we split
Coupled with Owen kicks, feds wanna take a pic
I saw some beauty in yo’ bitch, I’m tryna screw my dick
Came in your main real quick, now my kids born rich (let’s go, let’s go)
Ride the foreign, whip built up with toilets
I ain’t bring no cash out the back, cuddle my wallet
We soft like cottonelle, pussy nigga silent
I kill you rat, you stand no care in my conscious
[Chorus: Young Thug]
Maserati coupe, sedan in the garage (skrrt)
[?] all white gold, I’m no fraud (yeah)
Scoliosis, pink face Rollies with the chart
Pine-Sol, diamonds clean, living large
[Verse 3: Lil Duke]
Tesla truck (truck), yeah, we young and rich don’t give a fuck (give no fuck)
Heckler Koch (Koch), four five shells, yeah they gon’ live for more
Can’t wife no thot (wife no thot), I just fuck ’em then I give ’em up (I give ’em up)
Ten bands on the fit, hoes they say I do too much (I do too much)
They diggin’ this shit like a grave (grave)
Can’t do nothing ‘less, I’m gettin’ paid (paid)
My bitches so stuck in they ways (in they ways)
Walk through the back of the bitch, it’s a maze (it’s a maze)
Condo by lane, it’s a mall in it
Ain’t no one nigga, we all win (we all win)
Beat up that pussy, get tall in (tall in)
Lambo so low gotta fall in (fall in)
[Chorus: Young Thug]
Maserati coupe, sedan in the garage (skrrt)
[?] all white gold, I’m no fraud (yeah)
Scoliosis, pink face Rollies with the chart
Pine-Sol, diamonds clean, livin’ large
High school, had a bomb in my [?]
Middle school, had that TEC in my locker (tec)
I ain’t had to run from the principal (no)
I did it because the principle
[Outro: Young Thug]
Rolls gold, six froze on the Tonka (yeah)
Rolls gold, six by fours on the Tonka (yeah yeah)
Twelve colors on my clothes like a [?] (and what)
Twelve million to my hoe, she humongous (woo woo)

Taylor Swift – Thirteen Blocks (Can’t Call It Love) Lyrics

[Verse 1]
Stumble up the porch step
You sat down in the car
Only thirteen blocks across this town
To get to where you are
And that don’t offer me much time
To make up my mind
So I best be driving slow
On my way to letting go
These headlights they just wanna fade
Off into the night
But if they’re half as stubborn as me
They’ll just keep on shining bright
I ain’t ever been one to settle like
The dust does on the dash
Since the feeling ain’t strong
I’ll just move on
And leave this in my past
[Chorus]
Once you’re gone I know your memory’ll
Somehow get the best of me
So I question everything I do
Unsure of turning you away
Wondering love how I’ll act today
Until you find somebody new
So I’ve been holding on
Way too long
But not another minute
I’m gonna miss you bad but
Can’t call it love if you ain’t in it
[Verse 2]
Red light turns to green
Then back to red again
I wish there were some other travelers out here
To slow my travelling
Even though the wheel rolled on
Inside I still don’t know
Oh and it troubles me so
[Chorus]
Once you’re gone I know your memory’ll
Somehow get the best of me
So I question everything I do
Unsure of turning you away
Wondering love how I’ll feel today
I see you found somebody new
And I’ve been holding on
Way too long
But not another minute
I might miss you bad but
Can’t call it love if you ain’t in it
[Repeat Chorus]
[Outro]
Your car comes to a rest in the drive
You open up the door and I see you smile

Ariana Grande – breathin Lyrics

Time goes by and I can’t control my mind
Don’t know what else to try, but you tell me every time
[Chorus]
Just keep breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’
And oh, I gotta keep, I keep on breathin’
Just keep breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’
And oh, I gotta keep, I keep on breathin’, mmm, yeah
[Bridge]
My, my air
My, my air
My, my air, my air
My, my air
My, my air
My, my air, yeah
[Chorus]
Just keep breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’
And oh, I gotta keep, I keep on breathin’
Just keep breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’
And oh, I gotta keep, I keep on breathin’, mmm, yeah
[Outro]
Feel my blood runnin’, swear the sky’s fallin’
I keep on breathin’
Time goes by and I can’t control my mind
I keep on breathin’, mmm, yeah Mmm
Time goes by and I can’t control my mind
Don’t know what else to try, but you tell me every time
[Chorus]
Just keep breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’
And oh, I gotta keep, keep on breathin’
Just keep breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’ and breathin’
And oh, I gotta keep, keep on breathin’
[Verse 2]
Sometimes it’s hard to find, find my way up into the clouds
Tune it out, they can be so loud
You remind me of a time when things weren’t so complicated
All I need is to see your face
[Pre-Chorus]
Feel my blood runnin’, swear the sky’s fallin’
How do I know if this shit’s fabricated, oh? [Verse 1]
Some days, things just take way too much of my energy
I look up and the whole room’s spinning
You take my cares away
I can so overcomplicate, people tell me to medicate
[Pre-Chorus]
Feel my blood runnin’, swear the sky’s fallin’
How do I know if this shit’s fabricated?

Janet Jackson – Made for Now Lyrics

[Intro: Daddy Yankee]
Janet Jackson
Iconic
Daddy
[Verse 1: Janet Jackson]
If you’re livin’ for the moment
Don’t stop, and celebrate the feelin’
Go up, if you’re livin’ for the moment
Don’t stop, ’cause I break those ceilings
Go up
[Chorus: Janet Jackson & Daddy Yankee]
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now
Look around
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now (uno)
Look around (dos, tres)
We’re made for now (fuego)
[Post-Chorus: Daddy Yankee & Janet Jackson]
Everybody move your body, everybody
Everybody move your body, everybody (right now)
We’re made for now
Everybody move your body (right now), everybody (right now)
Everybody move your body (right now), everybody
[Verse 2: Janet Jackson & Daddy Yankee]
If you’re livin’ for the moment
Don’t stop, try to celebrate the feelin’
Go up, if you’re livin’ for the moment (the moment, baby)
Don’t stop, ’cause I break those ceilings
Go up
[Pre-Chorus: Janet Jackson]
Love is in the rhythm now, we’re
Dancing with a whole new meaning
Love is on the way to fill you up
[Chorus: Janet Jackson & Daddy Yankee]
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now
Look around
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now (uno)
Look around (dos, tres)
We’re made for now (fuego)
[Post-Chorus: Daddy Yankee & Janet Jackson]
Everybody move your body (woo), everybody
Everybody move your body, everybody (right now)
We’re made for now
Everybody move your body (right now), everybody (right now)
Everybody move your body (right now), everybody (right now)
[Chorus: Janet Jackson]
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now
Look around
We’re made for now (right now, right now)
Made for now (right now)
Right now (right now)
[Verse 3: Daddy Yankee]
Arriba la raza, estamos en la casa
Dale suelta en banda to’ lo que te atrasa
Muévete eso rápi-rápido
Muévete eso rápi-rápido
We don’t stop it, no te escapas
Yo soy volcán pero tú eres lava
Seguimos lighty, lighty, prendí’os
Vívelo hoy, que mañana se acaba
[Bridge: Janet Jackson]
Right now
Not tomorrow
Made for now (right now)
Look around
They’re made for now (right now)
Not tomorrow
Made for now
Look around
[Chorus: Janet Jackson & Daddy Yankee]
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now (sube)
Look around
We’re made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now
Look around
We’re made for now
[Post-Chorus: Daddy Yankee & Janet Jackson]
Everybody move your body (right now), everybody (right now)
We’re made for now
Everybody move your body (right now), everybody (right now)
We’re made for now
??? ponte pa’ mí (right now), ponte pa’ mí (right now) (Ponte, ponte, ponte)
We’re made for now
??? ponte pa’ mí (right now), ponte pa’ mí (right now)
We’re made for now
[Outro: Janet Jackson & Daddy Yankee]
Made for now
Not tomorrow
Made for now (Janet Jackson)
Look around

‘Life finds a way’: Outback residents capture drought experience

Why you should take your next holiday in a drought-affected town
Mr Skinn said there were a lot of photos of dying animals that come from drought coverage and he wanted to show a different side to the situation.”Those images are very graphic and yes they really hit home, but I like to think about how life goes on even through tough times,” he said.”Life always finds a way.”The exhibition run by Barcaldine Regional Council in partnership with PhD student Anne Smith emerged from a project by Ms Smith in 2014 which hoped to spur more drought funding.”In 2014 when the Federal government had drought assistance funding I was asked to do drought facilitation for centre care,” said Ms Smith.”After the funding was over I suggested that we do an exhibition of images to raise awareness of the drought crisis in regional Queensland.”And after its success I started to do a PhD about resilience in communities and how images impact well being and capacity in crisis events.”

Photo:
This photo by Aaron Skinn showed a lone sprig of green emerging from the cracked, dry earth. Photo:
This photo by John Finger showed how little there was for animals to eat on the dry land. Photo:
A cattle shed sits empty amid the drought in this photo by Kylie Owens. (Supplied: Aaron Skinn)
Social media and crisis eventsMs Smith, who hails from Airlie Beach, said after her own experience with the devastation that rocked her community post Cyclone Debbie, she realised the impact an image can have.”After cyclone Debbie I saw people posting images of the damage and it almost connected the Whitsunday Regional Council footprint,” Ms Smith said.”What’s fantastic about this particular project we have community members, mainly non-professionals, taking images of what they want to illustrate their experience.”Ms Smith said she believes the project could be a good way to help people dealing with drought to raise awareness and find a creative outlet during difficult times.”The whole purpose of the exhibition and the project is to identify whether participating in things like this help communities deal with crisis events such as drought,” she said.Barcaldine Regional Council Mayor Rob Chandler said the exhibition will be a reality check. (ABC Western Queensland: Aneeta Bhole)
Resilience in tough timesA single green shrub emerging from cracked, dry earth and a portrait from a wedding at a property just outside of town are a few of the images taken by Mr Skinn.He said the theme in his photographs was of resilience in his community.”I was out at a property just outside of town to shoot a wedding and as part of the photos I came across this scene with cracked dirt and a single tree right on the horizon with the bride and groom,” Mr Skinn said.”Immediately the image screamed what the drought was all about for me and the community … The harsh environment because of a lack of rain mixed in with life and love.”The drought is still going, but people are living out here — it’s hard but you have to look at the positive.”

Photo:
Emaciated animals are a commonly seen image to emerge from the drought situation. (Supplied: Kylie Owens)
“If you’re talking to the policy makers and people in the state and Canberra it makes it real,” he said.”I think the photos have a real way of creating an affinity within the hearts of city people from people in the bush.”It is a creative outlet and images speak louder than words … I think it’s good to have people express themselves in that way.”The photos will be exhibited at the Galilee Gallery in The Globe, Barcaldine. Dry cracked earth, an emaciated kangaroo and a blossoming romance in an isolated paddock are some of the images that will exhibit in western Queensland to raise awareness for the drought.The images were captured by residents of Barcaldine in the central-west, as part of the Our Strength In Drought Project started to give the community a creative outlet to document their experiences.Aaron Skinn is the local baker and professional photographer in town and said the drought is a well-covered subject, but said he struggled to truly understand the plight of those on the land.”I’ve seen the effect of the drought over the last 10 years on the town — there’s a lot of empty shops which you can attribute to that,” Mr Skinn said.”The photos allowed me to get out of town onto properties, which really illustrated to me that I wasn’t really aware of how the drought affected people on the land.”For me the whole exhibition has got me talking to graziers instead of just hearing about it second-hand through the doors of the business.”

Photo:
Barcaldine baker and photographer Aaron Skinn. (Supplied: Brett Walsh)
An image speaks a thousand words

The big dry: ‘See us, hear us, help us’ Many farmers and communities are facing ruin and they tell the ABC’s regional reporters across Australia that it’s time their city cousins acknowledged the catastrophe. (Supplied: John Finger)
Drought funding in the future”There are great photos in there … there’s one of a completely dry dam with one little bush poking out of the bottom of it they’re not all gruesome photos of the dead and the dying,” he said.”They’re photographs that tell the story about why we live where we live and also the drought and what that means.”

How you can help:Australian Red CrossRural Aid/Buy a BaleDrought AngelsAussie HelpersLions Need for FeedFoundation for Rural and Regional RenewalSalvation Army
Councillor Chandler said that people across Queensland, and in fact right across rural Australia, know how to handle droughts, floods and famine but this is the ‘worst on record’ in some places.”So, it’s just amazing how people can go year after year with below average rainfall and still be kicking in the end,” he said.He said the images would provide personal stories behind the community’s experience with drought.
Map:
Barcaldine 4725
Related Story:
Related Story:
The dos and don'ts of drought donation How can I help?
Defying the drought: Farmers who braced for the big dry
(Supplied: Aaron Skinn) ABC Western Qld

By

Aneeta Bhole

Posted

August 18, 2018 05:15:00

Photo:
Barcaldine residents took photos of their experience with drought for a local exhibition.

Related Story:

Cute, cuddly and freezing cold: stitching together a mother’s warmth for orphaned wildlife

ABC Illawarra

By

Sarah Moss

Posted

August 18, 2018 05:45:00

Video: Drought orphans at Native Wildlife Rescue in Robertson

(ABC News)
Related Story:
Related Story:
'Cuteness overload' as baby wombat takes 'jockey' ride on mother's back
Map:
Robertson 2577

Related Story:
New app helping Tasmanians reduce roadkill toll
(ABC Illawarra: Sarah Moss)
Fortunately for many of these tiny, furry creatures, Kerstin Schweth and Richard ‘Woody’ Woodman of Robertson have established a rehabilitation centre called Native Wildlife Rescue.Mr Woodman, who is also president of Wildlife Rescue South Coast, said the organisation is rescuing more animals than ever before.”We take in possums, flying foxes, snake rescues, joeys, wombats and birds,” he said.”We see two or three dead roadside wombats every day, many have joeys in the pouch,” she said.Drought makes animals vulnerable to accidentsDrought conditions are not helping either, with hungry animals forced to venture closer to the roadside in search of anything green to eat.”We have a revolving door here, but it appears that the door is spinning faster and faster with the amount of animals — it’s just unbelievable,” Ms Schweth said. (ABC Illawarra: Sarah Moss)
Ms Schweth was born in Germany and never thought she would find herself hand-rearing native Australian animals when she immigrated to Australia.”When the baby wombats and joeys first arrive they are often naked — without fur — and in dire need of warmth,” she said.She uses handmade pouches as a part of the rehabilitation process, which are in high demand this winter.”By offering a pouch they can burrow in so the animal feels safe and comforted,” Ms Schweth said.”But it’s clear that we don’t have enough time to make those pouches.”Community pitches in for the cause

Photo:
Kerstin Schweth (left) gratefully accepts a box of newly made pouches from Jennifer Bowe, president of Moss Vale CWA. Winter in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales is very cold and if you are a small mammal whose mother has just been killed then your chances of survival are very slim.This year those animals also have the drought to contend with so they need all the help they can get. Photo:
After donating their handmade pouches, the CWA ladies were grateful to meet some of the animals and hear how Ms Schweth and Mr Woodman run their Native Wildlife Rescue. Whatever Kerstin needs, we make,” Ms Bowe said.”It’s just like an envelope — we stitch down the sides and reinforce the tops so that when the animal goes in and out it makes the whole thing a bit more secure for the material not to deteriorate.Sandra Murray has also been making pouches with the CWA and said they upcycle old blankets purchased at op shops.”When I go to any of our local op shops and I see there’s no blankets I think, ‘oh Jennifer’s been here before me’, and of course I do go to the pet basket first because I only buy ratty blankets to cut up not good ones.””We’re here today to present Kerstin with another fresh batch of pouches and liners made from throw away fabrics.”It’s a win-win situation.”Ms Bowe said she is also selective when scouting for material.”When I look at available blankets I think, ‘human or animal?'” she said.”I generally leave it a week and if it’s still there I’ll have it for the animals.”Volunteers are always appreciated

Photo:
Ms Schweth and Mr Woodman showed some the ladies how the pouches will be used by joeys in need. (ABC Illawarra: Sarah Moss)
Ms Schweth reached out to her community to help make more pouches, which have a soft lining to imitate the real thing.The news got out and local women have been busy sewing and knitting pouches throughout winter.Ms Jennifer Bowe, president of the Moss Vale Country Women’s Association (CWA), helped coordinate making the pouches.”When the opportunity came up to make pouches I thought, well that’s something I could do for the animals and for the CWA ladies as well,” Ms Bowe said. (ABC Illawarra: Sarah Moss)
After months of work preparing the pouches the CWA members were able to meet the sick and tiny infants to see how their handiwork was being used.”This pouch is made out of old blanketing, it’s a large one but we can make smaller ones. The couple said they are so busy on their property that Woody complained he has to “book an appointment” to have a coffee with his wife.They only eat breakfast after they have fed all the babies and on this day there were 12 baby wombats and fifteen kangaroos to care for. Photo:
At 18 months of age ‘Lucy’ is rehabilitated and ready for release into the bush. Photo:
The baby marsupials stay in handmade pouches made of blanket cut and stitched like an envelope, lined with soft fabric like flannelette. (ABC Illawarra: Sarah Moss)
Like other rural community initiatives Ms Schweth and Mr Woodman desperately seek volunteers to help them out with their wildlife rescue centre so they can focus primarily on attending to the animals’ needs.”We need more people,” Ms Schweth said.”People who can help with the admin side or answering the phones.”For each animal we have to keep records in a database which go to National Parks, but I don’t have time to do that.”There are lots of jobs to do here like the data entry, milk preparing, bottle cleaning, paddock cleaning.”
'It's goosebump stuff': The joy and trauma of wildlife rescue

What it was like to grow up on your own tiny island — called Solitary

(Supplied: Precision Helicopters) ABC Coffs Coast

By Melissa Martin

Posted

August 18, 2018 06:00:00

Photo:
Up until 1975, South Solitary Island was home to only lighthouse keepers and their families.
The lighthouse needed a keeper 24 hours a day, so the shifts were split between three men.It meant there were other children to play with, but schooling was done as a family, with their mother as the teacher.”She was good, very patient, and we’d try to get the lessons done early so we could go and play,” Ms Masters said.The correspondence school packages came once a fortnight on the supply boat.”We’d get two packages a fortnight and if we got behind we really had to rush to make the mail bag. Both Peter and Debra are already talking about their next trip to their childhood home, and Ms Masters said it has highlighted for her how important her story is.”People should appreciate how it was for people living on islands, and we were pretty luxurious compared with someone in 1880 when they first went out there,” she said. But if we got it done we had the rest of the week off,” Mr Ross said. (Supplied: Friends of South Solitary Island Lighthouse)
The circa-1880 keepers cottages were left to the elements when the last lighthouse families left.More than 30 years later, they were handed over to National Parks and Wildlife.In the years since, restoration works have brought the buildings back to life and volunteers spend time on the island before the tours each year to carry out maintenance.”The buildings look completely different. It was just normal for us. Photo:
The Ross family lived on the South Solitary Island lighthouse during the early 1970s. She was a cook, she was a host, she was a nurse, she was a school teacher, a baker. Photo:
The Pamela Star supply boat for South Solitary Island. The fences were gone, the buildings were grey not white, they were a gleaming white when dad and the other lighthouse keepers were there,” Ms Masters said.The pair shared stories of their billycart races, days spent fishing, exploring, and playing soldiers.Mr Ross recalled a time the families were evacuated to the lighthouse, during a severe storm, when it was thought waves would come over the middle of the island.”We lost three feet of guttering and seven chickens because they just got blown away out of the chicken pen,” he said. Photo:
The children who lived on South Solitary Island made their own fun, including billycart races down the steep path from the lighthouse. (Supplied: Ross Family)
“Mum was fantastic. That was a really good treat.”And while waiting a fortnight between supplies may seem daunting, Ms Masters said they had it better than most.”We had electricity, we had running water, we had toilets, and we got our food fortnightly — where I believe in the early days they had to wait three months,” she said.”We had telephones so if there was an emergency or something we had contact with the mainland, whereas in the early days you were out there and you were isolated.”Every year, the Ross family was granted six weeks leave, and they went places where there was no reminder of their regular life.”We went west. (Supplied: Friends of South Solitary Island)
Ms Masters remembers those visits well.”It’s a bit embarrassing now, looking at the photos, walking down all dressed up and hair done and good dresses on,” she said.”But we did do it one time for a very specific reason — because the naval cadets were coming. It was a bit of an event for us, watching the basket being loaded and unloaded, it was all quite amazing,” he said. There was five of us so we always had someone to play with,” she said.A unique childhoodSouth Solitary Island is just 23 acres, or 0.09 square kilometres, in size.The rocky isle is cut in two by a deep passage of water around nine metres wide.In fact, it was over this passage that an early lighthouse keeper erected a flying fox. She had so many hats that she wore and wore them very well, I might add.”The supply boat’s arrival was a big event on the island and was quite a novelty for Mr Ross’ siblings.”My sisters all dressed up when the boat came. (Supplied: The Ross Family)
Mr Ross admits growing up on the island gave him a respect for safety.”I think we learned a lot about being responsible for yourself because we used to play around some pretty dangerous rock ledges and things like that. Imagine growing up on an island with no school, no shop, little to no technology, and only your siblings and a handful of other kids to spend your time with.That is the unique childhood experience of siblings Peter Ross and Debra Masters, whose father was one of the last of the lighthouse keepers on South Solitary Island, 18 kilometres off the coast of Coffs Harbour.The Ross family spent the early 1970s on the island before the lighthouse was automated and the island abandoned in 1975.”It was fascinating, but we didn’t really appreciate it for what it was until we grew up and met other people who had more boring lives,” Mr Ross said. But in saying that, we couldn’t wait to get back to it.”The journey backMr Ross and Ms Masters left South Solitary Island in 1975 when the old kerosene lighthouse lamp was replaced with an electric system, meaning it no longer required three lighthouse keepers to operate around the clock.Recently, and more than 40 years later, they made their first trip back.They shared their memories as part of tours of the island and its buildings, run just only once a year from Coffs Harbour by the National Parks and Wildlife Service and Precision Helicopters.”It was like I’d never been away,” Ms Masters said.”I was standing there on the veranda and looking out to sea and it was like it was yesterday.”

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Debra Masters on South Solitary Island in 2018, where she lived in the early 1970s and returned to be a guide on tourist trips. We went to Cobar, Bourke, Brewarrina, the Snowy, wherever there wasn’t any coastline, we’d go out there,” Mr Ross said.”We’d just about had enough of oceans. (The Ross Family)
“We just got on with it and did what kids do — we made billy-carts.”There were no Playstations or anything like that around so we had to make our own entertainment.”His sister Debra agreed that their childhood was something that felt normal, until reflecting on it years later.”We used to explore the island, we knew every inch of the island. Photo:
Children from the Ross Family play volleyball in the courtyard of their home on South Solitary Island Lighthouse. “The experience and that history should be shared.” So if we messed that up we’d be really seriously hurt,” he said.”We really had to make sure we were careful in what we were doing and I think we brought that into adulthood.”The Ross family was one of three on the island.
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‘We’re just Aussies with beards and turbans’: Sikh community invites all to TurbanFest

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By Nicole Mills

Posted

August 18, 2018 08:00:14

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TurbanFest is a chance for anyone to try wearing a turban. (ABC News: Nicole Mills)
Mr Singh prefers the sturdier style which originates from Sikh warriors, whereas fellow festival organiser Sabhi Singh prefers a style that originates from maharajahs.It’s just a personal preference.”I can look at a turban and see it’s too loose or too tight or it’s not in sync because of the lines, that’s actually the turban going around, so it has to be in a certain way,” Mr Singh said.”It’s an artform.”He said while the turban was an obvious sign of their faith, it didn’t change the way most Sikhs felt about their country. Amar Singh gets asked a lot of questions about his turban, but generally it boils down to:How long is your hair?How long is your turban?And how on Earth do you tie it?But sometimes, curious people just stare.The founding president of not-for-profit group Turbans 4 Australia wants to change that through a free community festival held in the heart of every capital city.”Too often, people see us on the street and they sometimes don’t have the courage, or they don’t think it’s right to come and say: ‘Oh, by the way, why do you wear a turban, what’s that all about?'”But at this event, people feel comfortable and they can ask any question they want and they’ll get a nice answer without offending anyone.”

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Sabhi Singh, Chaman Preet and Amar Singh from not-for-profit group Turbans 4 Australia. It’s an opportunity to have a one-on-one interaction and ask questions you might otherwise be too afraid to ask.”In our culture, if somebody rips off your turban or touches it it’s considered an insult, but here we are giving a piece of us to an outsider so we can teach them there’s nothing to worry about,” Mr Singh said.”Giving you a turban is a token from us to say we’re just mates.”Mr Singh wears a nine-metre-long turban that he describes as a “spiritual crown”. “We live in a multicultural, harmonious society and Australia prides itself on that. Sikhs have long hair which they must keep clean and a turban helps protect it. “We have to brush our hair twice a day, so it’s part of that [routine] that you tie your turban every day from scratch,” Mr Singh said.”In the Western culture, if a man grows a beard or has long hair it’s kind of seen as a sign of laziness, but as Sikhs we … (ABC News: Nicole Mills)
There are different ways to tie a turban. must keep it hygienic and clean so that’s why we tie it in a knot.”

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Sabhi Singh and Amar Singh stretch out the material used to tie a turban. (ABC News: Nicole Mills)
Alongside music and dance, TurbanFest also encourages non-Sikhs to have their own turban tied. “That’s why we’re proud to hold our cultural heritage and still be proud Australians.”We’re just Aussies with beards and turbans.”TurbanFest will be held at Queensbridge Square in Southbank, Melbourne from 11:00am to 5:00pm on August 19.
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