Ducklings rescued by firemen at Paralowie

(Supplied: Metropolitan Fire Service) Duckling season has sprung into action in Adelaide with firemen rescuing seven baby ducks from a drain near a worksite.Workmen noticed a mother duck in distress just after 3:00pm on Thursday near the muddy drain close to the corner of Melvina and Walpole roads, Paralowie, and called the Metropolitan Fire Service (MFS) for help.A MFS spokeswoman said the firemen came to the rescue with a ladder and braved the mud to fish out the ducklings.The drain was near a land development site.She said the feathered family were reunited and moved to a waterhole nearby. Photo:
Firemen used a ladder to reach the seven ducklings.
(Supplied: Metropolitan Fire Service) Posted

August 25, 2016 18:00:09

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A worker reported the ducklings were in the muddy drain.
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Stray dog reunited with athlete after completing endurance race together

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Photos of Gobi and Dion Leonard on Twitter
“Gobi has been found! She’s safe and well, a wee sore leg but overjoyed to see Dion,” a post on the Bring Gobi Home Facebook page said.Leonard said when he first saw Gobi he thought she would not last the day running with him, “but 25 miles I think we ran that day and she was still with me at the end”.He said she would have completed more of the race with him if not for the 52-degree temperatures of the Gobi desert.Race organisers ended up taking Gobi to the finish line of the stages she could not complete, where Leonard said she would wait for him to finish.”It was amazing to see her stand up and see me and come running towards me,” Leonard said.”It was during those sort of periods that I realised this was something else other than a little dog following me.”

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Gobi was found after five days of searching. Gobi the stray dog, who ran more than 100 kilometres across China in an endurance race with running buddy Dion Leonard, has been reunited with him after going missing. (Supplied: 4 Deserts) External Link:

Photo of Dion Leonard trying to find Gobi in China
The pair became inseparable when the dog initially “appeared from nowhere” while the Australian athlete was competing in the 250-kilometre Gobi March footrace across China earlier this year.They ended up finishing the race together, with Gobi completing 125 kilometres of the race.The bond between the two became so strong Leonard had decided to adopt the stray dog and bring her back to live with him in Edinburgh.Gobi had been due to fly to Beijing to begin the adoption process when she went missing in the streets of Urumqi in north-west China.Leonard flew to the region to search for her on August 20, and after five days of searching the pair were reunited.
(Supplied: 4 Deserts) Updated

August 25, 2016 18:53:09

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Gobi the dog ran almost half of the 250-kilometre Gobi March with Dion Leonard.
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‘Ankle-biter’ dogs to race this weekend outside Innamincka pub

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(Wikipedia: Steve-65) ABC North and West

Posted

August 26, 2016 11:47:49

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Rock up with your Jack Russell ahead of race time and you can enter, organisers say.
It’s a tail off a deceased cow.” They could be part of it too,” he said.”Just rock up on the day and we’ll have a bench set up with the secretary.”An impromptu race track will be set up outside the pub.”It’s just a little 30 to 40-metre straight line sprint with some little plastic barriers and I think there’s a little starting box, we’re sort of making it up as we go,” the club president said.He said punters could back their favourite dog: “I think people can just buy their dog for the race.”The winner can expect the usual rewards for such an event, Mr Barnes said: “They’ll get the cup and the ribbon and the bragging rights.”Port Lincoln in regional South Australia holds an annual tuna-tossing competition, but Mr Barnes said Innamincka had something to rival to that, the bullock tail throw, which happens on Sunday.”We’re in the cattle country so we chuck a bullock tail. The outback town of Innamincka has cancelled its annual horse race in favour of staging its first Dishlickers Cup, a dog race outside the local pub.Race club president Jason Barnes said floodwaters moving down the Cooper Creek made a dog race a safer bet this year for the region’s property owners and tourists who love to descend on the town on the last weekend of August.”The [horse] track is on the opposite side of the town to the Cooper and the causeway will be cut. It could cut at any time over the weekend,” he said.”So we’ve put our heads together and decided that a Jack Russell race out the front of the pub would be a good idea.”Mr Barnes said the race would be open to “ankle-biting chaps”, that is any dogs the size of Jack Russells and fox terriers.”There might be a few passing travellers who even have one with them.

Daffodil Day close to Paralympian Sharon Jarvis’s heart

By

Brittany Carter

Updated

August 27, 2016 15:51:58

Photo:
Sharon Jarvis with her horse Ceasy. (Supplied)
“It gives me goose bumps every time I think about [standing on the podium].” “The moment you see your country’s flag being raised … We marvel at the extreme commitment, strength and willpower our athletes possess to make it to Games level.And with the Paralympics just around the corner, these sentiments are echoed with added admiration; for their ability to do all the above while overcoming hardships in their past and day-to-day life.Today holds particular significance for Australian equestrian dressage athlete, Sharon Jarvis, who is currently in the Netherlands with her horse Ceasy preparing for her second Paralympic Games.Despite being eight hours behind Australia, today’s preparation will be made that little bit sweeter as she celebrates Daffodil Day some 15,000kms from home.Diagnosed with bone cancer at the age of seven, Jarvis has limited movement and strength in her left leg.Her parents were originally told she had just two months to live and a 20 per cent chance of survival.After a year of chemo and radiotherapy, Jarvis was given the all-clear and successfully avoided having to have her leg amputated. Yet the connection with this day runs much stronger than the obvious link.Twenty-three years ago, her family, which lived on an apple orchard farm in Donnybrook, donated thousands of truckloads of daffodils to the Cancer Council in Western Australia.The movement was still in its development stages, with the organisation unsure how to kick-start its fundraising campaign in WA.”My parents on the farm had been growing daffodils commercially for quite a few years and in 1993, were about to have our paddocks come out in full bloom,” Jarvis says.”My brother had been studying horticulture in New Zealand and was on the phone to my mum telling her how they hold Daffodil Day.”The family, with the help of the organisation, recruited volunteers to pick, transport and sell the flowers at local Perth markets; also distributing them to oncology and radiology centres.With their actions, Daffodil Day was born in the West.”It’s a very special day for my family to see how big it is now and how much it’s helped people.”The money goes to research, education and the support networks people need on their cancer journey.”Daffodils a symbol of hopeThe daffodil flower is an international symbol of hope for those whose lives have been affected by cancer.Jarvis proudly wears one of the day’s commemorative pins on her sock each time she competes.”It’s not just me riding out there, it’s everybody that’s helped me along the way and I’m so proud to represent everyone that’s had cancer, I’m out there for them as well.”She competed at the Beijing Paralympics but missed out on selection for the London Games.This disappointment, along with the feeling of standing on the 2010 World Equestrian Championships podium (where she won two bronze), are the driving force behind Jarvis’ Rio campaign. it’s very special to be able to bring those medals home to Australia,” she says.”It’d be amazing to have that feeling again and that’s certainly what I’m aiming for.”Australia’s Paralympics squad remain confident they will finish in the top five of the medal tally in Rio.While Jarvis is positive our team of four Equestrian riders, will make us proud.”I think we’ve got one of our strongest teams we’ve ever had and I know myself, my horse is looking well.””We’re really excited about what’s to come.”
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World dog day: Amazing feats of man’s best friend

A shout-out to all guide dogs — not all heroes wear capes.These hard workers help the vision-impaired go about their daily business.Just don’t pat them, please — a single, though well-intentioned, pat can undo months of training.
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Updated

August 26, 2016 13:23:03
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Sled dogs
We just make sure he’s really fit and we spoil him lots,” owner Tegan Eagle said.The city pooch spends most of his day perched on his master’s bed, whines if he is left outside in the cold or rain, and eats leftover human food.Maggie the matriarch

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Brian McLaren estimates Maggie was almost 30 years old when she died. (Supplied)

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Bailey the kelpie's high jump world record
Another Bailey making the list — this kelpie is the record holder for the kelpie high jump.He cleared a 2.951-metre barrier earlier this year, smashing the previous record set in 2007, in front of a crowd of thousands at the Casterton Kelpie Muster in Victoria.”It just happens naturally. (Fairfax Media: Jono Pech )
Maggie passed away earlier this year (RIP Maggie) at the age of “at least 29-and-a-half”.She had lived on Brian McLaren’s dairy farm in southern Victoria since she was just eight weeks old, and had “the greatest life” rounding up cows, waiting for the kids to come home from school, and drinking milk (but not too much).According to the Guinness World Records, the oldest age recorded for a dog is 29 years and five months — for another Australian working dog named Bluey.The guide dogs After being dumped in Australian animal shelters, many of these alpine canines have been given a second chance to thrive where they belong.”We know some of them are very submissive, so they must’ve been abused,” Markus Israng, proud owner of six rescue dogs, said.These rescue huskies race as a sledding team — like ducks to water, when the dogs hit the snow, they’re home.Bailey the world-record holder

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Tegan Eagle bought and keeps kelpie Bailey as a pet in her suburban backyard. We don’t tend to practice at all.
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International Guide Dog Day
(Facebook: Buddy’s Bucket List)
Buddy the blue heeler was diagnosed with terminal cancer earlier this year, and owner Emily Mochan wanted his remaining days to be positive.She made a bucket list of 50 things for them to achieve together, including having a famous cricketer throw the ball for him, sitting in a cop car and (of course) going for a run at the beach.Buddy passed away having achieved all but one of the list: “The only thing was to help other animals … (Twitter: Karen Nelson)
In the dog-eat-dog world of politics, some stand above the rest.Duke the great Pyrenees is possibly one of the most popular politicians in the US, having been elected for his third term in office.”Everybody voted for Duke — except for one vote for his girlfriend, Lassie,” according to Duke’s owner, David Rick.Bailey the wharf protector

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Bailey keeps guard over the museum’s vessels. (Supplied: 4 Deserts)
Gobi the stray dog ran about 125 kilometres across China in an endurance race with running buddy Dion Leonard, after appearing “from nowhere” while the Australian was competing in the Gobi March footrace earlier this year.Leonard said when he first saw Gobi he thought she would not last the day running with him, “but 25 miles I think we ran that day and she was still with me at the end”.The bond between the two became so strong Leonard decided to adopt Gobi and bring her back to live with him in Edinburgh, despite some minor setbacks.Duke the politician

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The nine-year-old great pyrenees was first elected in 2014. (ABC News: Margaret Burin) all his toys will go to shelter dogs. (Facebook: Buddy’s Bucket List)

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Buddy poses for the camera as part of his bucket list. They’re man’s best friend, after all.Take a look back at some of the amazing feats of our four-legged friends this past year on World Dog Day.Buddy the bucket list conqueror

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Queensland Police Service allowed Buddy to be a police dog for the day. He’ll finish his list as soon as that’s done.”Gobi the endurance runner

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Gobi the dog ran almost half of the 250-kilometre Gobi March with Dion Leonard. (Supplied: Australian National Maritime Museum)
This border collie’s got the eye of a sailor, flies with the wind and lives 24 hours on the job.The Australian National Maritime Museum employee is so enthusiastic for his job (chasing away seagulls causing a mess on the Pyrmont wharf) he needs a dog flotation device.”He has ended up in the harbour four or five times now from being overeager,” head of security Adrian Snelling said.The sled dogs

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These alpine dogs competing in a sled race at Mount Buller are all rescue pups. (Supplied: 4 Deserts)

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Gobi was found after five days of searching.

Elite athlete mentoring program offers hope to veterans with PTSD

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Creative writing helping military vets deal with PTSD
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He said he believed his last tour of Timor-Leste triggered his PTSD. Photo:
Ex-Army officer and police officer Brendan Larkin enjoys a laugh with Timor-Leste children. (Supplied)
“Some of the events that occurred in East Timor were horrific,” he said.”As a police officer you see dead bodies, but what I saw over there probably set me over the edge.”I was a functioning human being prior to deploying.”As a result of several incidents that occurred overseas I came back as a non-functioning human being and life fell apart.”Mr Larkin’s PTSD affected his marriage, family relationships and employment.”While most people with PTSD drink themselves to death, this [program] has been a really good kick up the bum,” he said.Humbling, inspiring journeyElite track cyclist Caitlin Ward is one of the athletes taking part in RSL Active through the Next Level Elite mentors program.Ward recently discovered that her great aunt and uncle and her grandparents served in the world wars.She said this mentoring project offered her a great opportunity to pay homage to the sacrifices her family had made.She said she was humbled when the soldiers shared their personal stories with her.”They’ve all been through so much.”It was incredible that they gave me that trust and were willing to let me in.”

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Elite athlete Australian cyclist Caitlin Ward in action on the velodrome. “It’s difficult to transition back into the community,” he said.”[RSL Active] doesn’t guarantee to stop that brain working, but it gives you mechanisms to help do that.”One man’s battleFor Brendan Larkin, taking part in the program helped him in his battle with depression.”Rather than just lying on a bed and taking pills and looking at the ceiling, this encourages positive thinking and all sorts of things that are natural enemies of PTSD,” he said.Mr Larkin was a soldier before he joined Victoria Police and continued as an Army reservist. A new program in Adelaide is pairing elite athletes with returned soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).RSL Active is piloting the program which sees the athletes talk about positive mindset techniques and share stories of their challenges and successes.”It’s to fill that gap with health, wellbeing, social and family reintegration,” RSL Active coordinator Mark Reidy said.”The synergy between athletes and veterans is unique.”The program is based on similar US and Canadian projects and began in Australia in Adelaide at the start of 2016.Veterans are also given access to art and equine therapy, yoga and meditation classes.Mr Reidy said one of the biggest hurdles for soldiers with PTSD was learning how to gradually switch off their heightened state of awareness. (VIS: John West)
Ward said the regimentation of a professional athlete’s life and that of a soldier were very similar and that allowed them to find common ground quickly.”The structure and determination and the grit that you have to have as a person to be able to get through are very similar,” she said. If you or anyone you know needs help:Lifeline on 13 11 14Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978Suicide Call Back Service on 1300 659 467Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36Headspace on 1800 650 890
Military veterans turn to yoga to ease PTSD
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Army veteran reveals struggle with mental illness after Iraq tour
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Brett Williamson

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August 26, 2016 13:35:12

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Cyclist Caitlin Ward is one of the athletes sharing their stories with veterans like Brendan Larkin.

Australia’s oldest working scientist fights to stay at university

(ABC News: Laura Gartry)
“David is very resilient, but I think it would shatter him once it happens,” she said.”We have to do something quickly to change the situation. He has embraced technology and has used a computer for decades. At the age of 102, Australia’s oldest working scientist says he has not given up hope he can retain his office and freedom on campus after a Perth university told him to leave his post.Honorary research associate Dr David Goodall has been inundated with support from around the country after the news he had been declared unfit to be on campus made headlines. “People are staying healthier for longer, and if a person wants to work and is able to work and contribute then I think that each case should be judged on its merits.”All of us are going to get old and does that mean that we are not expected or wanted to contribute if we can, or just put into nursing homes or forced to have a carer just because we are not as physically able as we used to be?” Ms Goodall-Smith said. It was nice trip, but I would have preferred to have company, I was rather lonely,” he said. Luckily it’s in the daytime because since my licence was taken away I rely on public transport,” he said. “We also have concerns about his general wellbeing when on campus. They should be given every opportunity of doing so in the society in which we live in.”

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Dr Goodall is on the editorial board of the journal Tropical Ecology (ABC News: Laura Gartry)
Professor Goodall’s daughter Karen, who met with the university this week, said the requirement for her father to have a carer on campus was unnecessary.”I think that is very demeaning and disempowering,” she said. We read and perform poetry of all sorts at different locations around Perth. Dr Goodall became a professor and leader in the field of desert ecology, working at the universities of California and Utah, before returning to Perth and undertaking fieldwork in the Kimberley and Great Western woodlands. “I’m the oldest, we call ourselves Well Versed. His position is unpaid and largely involves reviewing academic papers and supervising PhD students. But at 102, Dr Goodall lives an exceptional life. Photo:
Dr Goodall visited the Abrolhos Islands in May with his daughter and a naturalist group. The question would not have arisen if I were not an old man,” he said.”I would hope that my example may lead to other people being able to continue being active in their field, up to a very advanced age like me. He still reviews and edits papers for different ecology journals, and was publishing his own research until 2014. Photo:
Dr Goodall and his second wife Muriel at their wedding in 1949 in Melbourne. “It’s been a bit of an exceptional week of course, I certainly haven’t followed my normal routine,” he said. The esteemed ecologist has even been contacted by scientists in Europe supporting his right to work on campus at an academic institution. (Supplied: Karen Goodall-Smith)
He lives alone unassisted, does his own shopping on the weekends and travels to the Joondalup campus at least four days a week, making the 90-minute commute that involves catching two buses and a train.Dr Goodall still enjoys reading Shakespeare and performs poetry to a reading group every week with 10 other friends. (Supplied: Karen Goodall-Smith)
Dr Goodall has produced more than 100 research papers, earning three doctorates and receiving a member of the Order of Australia.He received his PhD from Imperial College in London, and then moved to Ghana for his first job in the cocoa industry.Dr Goodall has been married three times and has four children. Photo:
Dr Goodall believes advanced age or diminishing physical ability should not be a barrier to contributing to society. Dr Goodall also took The Ghan train journey from Darwin to Adelaide solo at the end of 2015. Photo:
Dr Goodall has been working as scientist for more than seven decades. To minimise these risks, we have consulted with him and his family and reached an agreement to set up a home office at a location of his choosing,” he said. Still an avid traveller, he took a trip to the Abrolhos Islands, 60 kilometres off the West Australian coast with his daughter and a naturalist group in May this year. Photo:
Dr Goodall worked in senior research roles in Africa during his early career. “He is a very intelligent, bright man, sharper than many people a quarter of his age.”Ms Goodall-Smith said it had been a very stressful time for her father. Video: Australia's oldest scientist fights for career

(ABC News)
Dr Goodall became the chief editor of the journal Ecosystems of the World when he retired at the age of 65, editing about 30 volumes, including the works of 500 authors from many countries. “It was good to see it all again. He said he was not allowed to join the defence forces during WWII while undertaking his doctorate.”I did in fact have a medical examination for the Navy, but as soon my boss heard of this he said no, no, no you can’t take my researchers, they are much more important to the world of agriculture, than the war effort,” he said.He was then appointed to a senior lecturer position at the University of Melbourne, before working for the CSIRO in tobacco industry in North Queensland and later in mathematical statistics. (Supplied: Karen Goodall-Smith)
Despite the phone ringing off the hook, Dr Goodall doesn’t watch television and hasn’t seen the online articles. Dr Goodall said the decision highlighted the issue of ageism in the workplace.”It’s depressed me, it shows the affect of age. Dr Goodall went on small boat tour to observe the seals and explored the deserted islands looking for wildlife. It was trip down to memory lane, as he first published research about the crayfish pots in the area in 1960s. I’ve been worried about how David would cope with this, it’s been a whirlwind,” she said. (Supplied: Karen Goodall-Smith)
After almost two decades at Edith Cowan University, from next year, he has been told to pack up his office and will only be permitted on campus for prearranged meetings, to which he will have to be accompanied.The university said the decision was made after numerous concerns were raised by staff and students about Dr Goodall’s safety and wellbeing.ECU vice-chancellor Professor Steve Chapman said the university had identified risks associated with Dr Goodall travelling to and from campus.
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Laura Gartry

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August 27, 2016 16:16:09

Video: David Goodall wants to keep his office on campus after a Perth university told him to leave

(ABC News)
102yo researcher told to leave uni post
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Adelaide Zoo’s giant pandas celebrate their birthdays

(Supplied: Zoos SA Adrian Mann) Photo:
Wang Wang is turning 11 on Wednesday. Adelaide Zoo has thrown a double birthday bash for its much-loved giant pandas Wang Wang and Fu Ni.Fu Ni turned 10 years old on August 23, while Wang Wang will celebrate his 11th birthday on Wednesday.To celebrate the duo’s big day, Adelaide Zoo has thrown an “epic birthday celebration” which will see the two pandas be treated to specially prepared panda treats, complete with birthday cakes, presents and decorations.Adelaide Zoo senior panda keeper Simone Davey said this was the sixth birthday Wang Wang and Fu Ni have celebrated in Australia since arriving at the zoo in 2009.”Wang Wang and Fu Ni are still very young and very playful pandas, so they are definitely in for a lot of fun at the party,” she said.”As keepers, we form incredibly close bonds with the animals in our care, so it’s always wonderful to be able to share special days like this with Wang Wang and Fu Ni.”Wang Wang and Fu Ni are part of an international giant panda research, conservation and breeding program.Adelaide Zoo has unsuccessfully tried to breed Fu Ni with her male counterpart, Wang Wang, five times in the past.

Updated

August 28, 2016 12:51:06

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Fu Ni turned 10 years old on August 23. (Supplied: Zoos SA Adrian Mann)
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'Window has passed' for Adelaide giant panda to give birth

Toddlers and elderly bond over story sessions

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By Fiona Pepper

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September 01, 2016 16:20:46
Toddlers and the elderly bond over books One morning a week, children from a northern Sydney day care centre visit their local aged care facility where residents read them their favourite books. (ABC RN: Fiona Pepper)
The children and the elderly residents quickly formed individual bonds.”In the same way that you know someone, you gravitate towards someone familiar, it’s the same thing here,” said Ms Krebs. They can just enjoy themselves.”

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Joyce Miller and Hannah telling stories together during weekly story time. (ABC RN: Fiona Pepper)

The benefits of story time Hear more about the sessions by listening to the RN Life Matters story. “They were so excited and so stimulated by the kids walking in and the kids were so excited by the residents. There was a beautiful interaction between the two of them.”

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Verity is three-and-a-half and enjoys chatting with her favourite resident, Robyn. The elderly residents of the Group Homes Australia St Ives facility in Sydney’s northern suburbs excitedly greet three-year-old Verity as she clip-clops down the hallway in her gumboots.Every Thursday children from the local day care centre bring their favourite books to the home for the residents — many of whom are living with dementia — to read to them. (ABC RN: Fiona Pepper) Photo:
Joyce Miller and Isabella read stories together. (ABC RN: Fiona Pepper)
The story time sessions came about quite organically. (ABC RN: Fiona Pepper)
And it’s not just the residents who are benefitting from the sessions. Photo:
Resident Geoff Southham at story time. Ms Klass says the children love becoming the centre of attention.”The residents are very focused on the kids when they visit, so there’s a lot of one-on-one attention. Photo:
The story time coordinator say the children and residents have formed a special friendship. The light shines on them.”They don’t have to share their time with anybody else because they’re both living for the moment, with no expectations on either side. The day care centre is across the road from the nursing home; when residents went for their daily walks past the day care centre they began to strike up conversations.Michelle Klass, the head of the Family Day Care Centre, and Tamar Krebs, the chief executive of Group Homes Australia, trialled the sessions and two years on, the program has proven hugely beneficial for both the residents and the children.”It was amazing to see that the residents living with dementia were able to come alive,” said Ms Krebs. (ABC RN: Fiona Pepper)
“For a moment in time, the residents feel like they are purposeful again and that somebody needs them.”Purposefulness and meaningfulness for somebody living with dementia is essential to their livelihood, to celebrating their own individuality, to fighting depression, to fighting isolation. “When they’re walking down the street, they know each little kid and they can greet them and it’s a beautiful interaction.”

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Small children and residents enjoy each other’s company.

Thousands of birthday cards for boy with autism

Christmas cards flood in for girl who lost family to arson
Let’s just say it’s more than the 20 or so I hoped for,” she said.”[He] tried to open cards to make room for more but hardly made a dent!”She said Ollie was feeling “famous” after receiving all the cards.”No one gives me birthday cards, just me,” Ollie told the Plymouth Herald.”It’s fab, amazing and fun — but not so many next year please.”Ms Jones said the response has been incredible, adding there are “Ollies everywhere … Photo:
Ollie received thousands of cards from well-wishers around the world. (Facebook)
“He loves opening cards to [the] extent he’s made himself a couple,” she wrote in a post to her local community Facebook page.”We are [a] small family and he has no friends so gets very few.”If you have an old one at [the] back of [the] cupboard maybe you could send it to him?”By the time it was Ollie’s birthday, four days after the post, he had received thousands of cards from strangers around the world.”People keep asking for numbers that arrived! Photo:
Ollie had written a couple of cards for himself before his birthday, Karen Jones said. A boy with autism has received thousands of birthday cards from around the world after his mother made an appeal online.Ollie Jones celebrated his 15th birthday on the weekend, but mother Karen Jones asked her local community in Plymouth, England to help out with cards after she noticed he had written some for himself. (Facebook: Karen Jones) Sending cards can bring so much joy.”She said the stamps from the cards would be donated to a children’s charity. this is today’s!””Some people might think it’s just a card — but to us it’s massive.

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(Facebook: Karen Jones) Updated

August 29, 2016 13:01:37

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Ollie’s mother, Karen Jones, asked her local community to help out with cards after she noticed he had written some for himself.

‘Book ninjas’ keeping Melbourne commuters well-read

Little Free Libraries popping up across Melbourne
“We’re happy to have a whole range of books. We’re trying to keep it as diverse as possible.”Given the randomness of public transport, you never know who’s going to find it and what they’ll enjoy.”Book ninjas part of ‘quiet movement’Ms Kalus said her greatest fear was that the books would be thrown out by cleaning staff.”We’re hoping that most of the books go into safe hands, people who are excited to read the books.” She said Books On The Rail was yet to formally approach Metro Trains, Yarra Trams or Public Transport Victoria about the initiative. Hundreds of books are travelling independently on Melbourne’s trams, trains and buses in search of a reader.The free range books have been set loose on the city’s public transport by “book ninjas” as part of a new movement called Books On The Rail.Co-founder Michelle Kalus said each book was festooned with a sticker on the front and a flyer inside the cover explaining the project.”It says who we are and instructs people to take the book, read it, enjoy it, and then return it to a service,” she told 774 ABC Melbourne’s Rafael Epstein. External Link:

Books on the Rail post on social media about where new books can be found. Publishers, authors donating new releasesMs Kalus started Books On The Rail in April with friend Ali Berg, who met the founder of a similar initiative while living in London. She and Ms Berg have set up a website where members of the public are able to sign up to become book ninjas — people who place books on public transport.”We’ll send you out a book ninja pack with stickers and flyers,” Ms Kalus said. “At this stage we’re a little bit more subversive and we’re enjoying this quiet movement.”It’s a lot of fun and we’re just hoping to enrich people’s days.” She said there were about 300 books in circulation on Melbourne’s public transport network, most of which were new releases.”We have been really lucky to work with great publishers and authors who are sending new release books,” she said.
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Books On The Rail was modelled after London’s Books On The Underground. (Twitter: Books on the Rail)
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Simon Leo Brown

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August 29, 2016 15:26:45
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Phone app connects people with disabilities to carers with shared interests

7.30

By Jodie Noyce

Updated

August 29, 2016 18:54:47

Video: Andrew Rotondo and his carer Sarah Peddie-McGuirk talk about their friendship

(ABC News)
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I didn’t get to go out at all,” he told 7.30.That changed when he was connected to Sarah Peddie-McGuirk through the Hireup app.”We share an interest for performing arts, so I love music, I love dancing and Andrew obviously loves music, he loves performing and I think that’s probably what drew us together,” she said.Growing up, Mr Rotondo’s life wasn’t easy and his time at school was particularly difficult.”I really didn’t have … We have lot of respect for one another and a lot of admiration for one another as well,” Ms Peddie-McGuirk said.”We just have a lot of fun together, it’s a very easy friendship to have.”Andrew is now doing activities he never thought would be possible and he is continuing his grandfather’s legacy of singing Italian opera.”I think if he was here he would want to come and do it with me,” he said.App CEO had brother with cerebral palsy

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Hireup founder Jodran O’Reilly (r) with his brother Shane (l) (Supplied)
Mr O’Reilly said the app allowed users to search for likeminded people in their local area on a map. People with a disability are gaining greater control over their care thanks to a new phone app and the National Disability Insurance Scheme.Under the NDIS hundreds of thousands of Australians living with a disability will be allocated a budget to manage and choose what support they want to receive.Enter the Hireup app, which uses social networking technology to match people with carers based on their shared interests and personality, rather than just needs.’We have a lot of respect for one another’

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Andrew Rotondo busking at Sydney’s Circular Quay Andrew Rotondo, 19, was born with cerebral palsy and has always struggled to find carers who suit his personality and share his interests, including singing.”I didn’t get to get out much. “You can send messages through the platform to start that communication and when the time is right you can create a booking,” he said.Mr O’Reilly’s late brother Shane had cerebral palsy, and he watched on for years as the system failed him.”I vividly remember sort of waiting there on the couch at 7:00am, waiting for a knock on the door from someone who’d we’d never met who was coming in to get my brother out of bed and into the shower — and that was an incredibly disempowering experience for him and for our family,” he said.”It really got me thinking, could we do this a better way.” There is a lot of banter, a lot of sort of ripping each other off, I guess you’d say. many friends to hang around with,” he said.Through his connection with Sarah he regularly goes out busking and sings Italian opera, which he learnt from his grandfather, who recently died.”The development in Andrew by connecting him with someone who was so appropriate was really amazing for us to see,” Hireup CEO Jordan O’Reilly said.Ms Peddie-McGuirk and Mr Rotondo have also formed a close friendship.”Andrew and I have a really brilliant friendship.

‘Perfection doesn’t exist’: Aussie stars reveal letters to their teen selves

But, you will learn from these mistakes. Situations will present themselves that can alter the course of your life forever. Some of Australia’s most prominent identities have revealed what they would say to their teenage selves if they were given the chance, in a new project inspired by the struggles of a 15-year-old Melbourne girl.Two years ago Wesley College student Grace Halphen was having a tough time fitting into school and dealing with the pressures that came with it.”Girls were mean, social media dictated my every move and I desperately wanted to fit in, but I never felt that I did,” she said.”This all seemed like the end of the world, and I just couldn’t see that I wasn’t the only one feeling like I was on the outside.”Grace decided to do something about it, and wrote to Australians she admired most and asked them to write a letter to their teenage self to prove to herself she wasn’t alone. You will never be happy if you compare yourself to other people.Layne Beachley, pro surferComparing yourself to others only makes you feel inadequate, so appreciate others, learn from other people’s mistakes and never put them on a pedestal.Maggie Beer, cookDon’t feel you have to be brilliant at everything so don’t have a fear of failure, try as many things as you can.Nathan Buckley, AFL coachThere will be moments of joy and sadness. That I can guarantee,” musician Chet Faker wrote.Grace said the advice had really helped her through her own experiences.”It was really great to see that all these people I look up to, who have gone on to do such amazing things, went through some tough times at school like I did,” she said.”I think it definitely helped.”

Advice to their teen selvesAdam Gilchrist, former cricket starWhatever you are doing to others, someone else could be doing to you, so either make it positive or leave them alone to enjoy their time. You will feel favoured at times and isolated in others. (ABC News Breakfast)
What followed is a new book, Letter To My Teenage Self, compiling 50 responses from people as varied as sports stars Adam Gilchrist and Chris Judd, to political figures Josh Frydenberg and Natasha Stott Despoja and musicians Guy Sebastian, Missy Higgins, Kate Ceberano and Dannii Minogue.”Possibly even the exact things you’re being teased for right now at school are the exact things that will gain you respect and many-a-high-five once you’re out into the real world,” Higgins wrote.Grace said a common thread through the letters was “everyone talking about how they did worry about things that don’t even matter any more”.”A lot of people also talked about how they didn’t fit in and that’s really great for all of us to hear because I think the reason why so many people do feel uncomfortable at school is because they feel as though they’re the only ones,” she said.The responses delve into a range of issues that teenagers face on the emotional rollercoaster through adolescence, from learning to laugh at yourself, embracing the things that make you different, not letting negative experiences affect you too much, and practising gratitude.”One thing that might help you relax is the fact that nobody knows what they are doing. Guy Sebastian, musicianWith success comes temptation. Sophie Lee, actorBeing cool is never more important than being kind.Stephanie Rice, swimmerWhen times get tough, always remember to ask for help and take time to turn inwards and reflect. Have some foresight and choose wisely.Kate Ceberano, musicianYou will rarely repeat the same mistake twice, but you will make mistakes. It’s called respect.Chris Judd, former AFL playerFrom what I can gather, there are very few things you can confidently do to excess without paying a heavy price for it later on.Dannii Minogue, musicianTry to remember that perfection doesn’t exist. It’s an ideal, not a reality. You will feel pride and feel embarrassment. All of these emotions and events are to be embraced. Jo Stanley, radio hostHere’s a lesson that I wish wish WISH I had learned at your age, and not be still struggling to master now. Photo:
Grace Halphen is the editor and creator of Letter To My Teenage Self.
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Australia
ABC News Breakfast

By

Patrick Wood

Updated

August 30, 2016 09:38:19

Video: Melbourne teenager Grace Halphen has compiled a book full of letters that Australian identities have written to their teen selves. (ABC News)

Fisho’s crowdfunding bid for lost thongs has nice footnote

105.7 ABC Darwin

Updated

August 30, 2016 12:52:13
(Supplied)
On his way home Mr Whalan at first felt that he “didn’t know what to do”, until he remembered something about online crowdfunding.”To be honest, I’ve never used it before. They’re good,” Mr Whalan said.”I’d had them for at least two years. It’s not something I do often,” he said.”I thought it would be a bit of a laugh. They consider it bad luck, so I decided to leave them next to a rock on the boat ramp.”I came back about eight hours later — and I wasn’t as sober as when I’d left — and the thongs are gone.”Mr Whalan said after an exhaustive five-minute search, and confirming he and his mates were indeed at the right ramp, the thongs were declared lost with suspicions of daylight robbery.Unfortunately these were not any $4 cheap thongs and were actually a prized pair.”These ones have bottle openers on the bottom of them. It all started with a humble plea: “Some bugger nicked me pluggers.”Now a Darwin fisherman who crowdfunded for a new pair of shoes is set to donate the money to those less fortunate after raising $69 to replace his “good” thongs.”I didn’t think it would go that far,” Clancy Whalan said.Earlier this month, Mr Whalan headed out one morning to Buffalo Creek for a spot of fishing with three mates with Territory-style nicknames — Soddy, Big Hands and Hot Beers.”They don’t like thongs on the boat. They are in a better place.””Wishing you and your new thongs all the best in what I hope is a long and lovely union.”Mr Whalan said the surprising string of donations — nine people over 10 days — would now be put towards charity.”There’s a story I read the other day about a young family who lost their mother to a spider bite,” he said.”I think they’re more needing of the money than me, so I’ll give it to them. They were actually my backup thongs as I lost my new thongs a few weeks earlier. I’d left them on a mate’s boat on Beer Can Regatta Day.”

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Clancy Whalan’s crowdfunding campaign to replace his lost thongs. I didn’t think anyone would put any money towards it, but $69 has been raised.”‘Sorry for your loss mate’Comments on Mr Whalan’s crowdfunding page have been overly empathetic.”There ya go bruss, buy some plash ones ay!!!””Sorry for your loss mate. “As soon as I figure out how the site works, I’ll pass the money on.”Mr Whalan said he would probably buy himself a pair of cheap thongs for future fishing trips.
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Clancy Whalan back in the day in his prized $69 thongs that were stolen. (Supplied: Clancy Whalan)

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Darwin 0800

Helping the homeless one tiny house at a time

Surviving homelessness: Realities of life on the street
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(Supplied: Tiny Homes Foundation)
The approved plan will provide four to six single-occupancy units, a common laundry, lounge and vegetable garden.Each house can be built for less than $30,000 and be prefabricated or flat packed for easy assembly.They will be 14 square metres large and include a bathroom, kitchen, sleeping area, living area, a small deck and rainwater tank.”We’re not trying to build the next biggest charity, we’re just trying to solve homelessness,” David Wooldridge, chief executive of Tiny Homes Foundation, told 702 ABC Sydney.”All of us are only just two or three steps away from homelessness; you just need a couple of major setbacks in your life to hit you simultaneously.”Creating a long-lasting solutionMore than 100,000 people are homeless at any given time in Australia.They may be people sleeping on the street, rough sleepers, couch surfers and, according to Mr Wooldridge, “people who are transitioning out of domestic violence situations or other situations”. A woman and her child who have fled domestic violence; a man left without a home from a fractured relationship; a young person trying to overcome a drug and alcohol addiction.These are the people that not-for-profit organisation Tiny Homes Foundation hope to help in a new pilot project on the New South Wales Central Coast.Australia’s first Tiny Homes project is set to begin construction next to Gosford Hospital in the coming months. Video: Homelessness on the increase

(ABC News)
Mr Wooldridge works in the finance sector but spends much of his free time out on the street volunteering with homeless support groups.He said he was partly inspired to start Tiny Homes Foundation out of his Christian faith and the philosophy that we should “treat others in a way you’d like to be treated yourself”.”[The foundation is] something that came out of working with rough sleepers and being out at all hours of the morning handing out sleeping bags and food and just sitting with people and spending time with them, because loneliness is a big issue for them,” he said.”I wanted to put back into something that was constructive, that would last and have a lasting impact rather than have a bandaid solution.”Tiny Homes a ‘drop in the ocean’The foundation will work with local social housing provider Pacific Link, which will be responsible for allocating tenants to the homes.Those tenants would then pay a small rental fee out of their government support payments.The average rent is about $51 per week. (Facebook: Coast Shelter)
Shayne Silvers, operations manager at social support organisation Coast Shelter, said while the Tiny Homes project might help a young person transition out of a refuge, she said the plan for only a handful of single-dwelling units was “a drop in the ocean”.”I don’t think they’re ideal for families,” Ms Silvers said. Those sort of homes would not be suitable for larger families.”

Surviving homelessness: Realities of life on the street Australians with first-hand experience of homelessness tell ABC Open what it is like living without a permanent home, and what needs to change to get people off the streets. Photo:
Each home will have insulated panels and be self-supporting, allowing for easy construction. Photo:
Coast Shelter is a not-for-profit social housing and support group on the Central Coast. Ms Silvers said Coast Shelter had turned away 1,238 women this year as there had been no vacancies in the refuges.She said public housing was at capacity and some people on the Central Coast could be on the waiting list for 13 to 15 years before being allocated a home.Despite that, Ms Silvers said Tiny Homes could help alleviate more of the homeless if the pilot project was successful and could be set up on other vacant land.”My mantra is: If we can help one, we’ve succeeded,” she said. “The homelessness situation is so large, especially here in a regional area where we have a lot of transient people that come up from Sydney.”The women that come in will be a mum and three [kids].
(Supplied: Tiny Homes Foundation) 702 ABC Sydney

By

Amanda Hoh

Updated

September 01, 2016 08:50:58

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The tiny homes will be steel framed with timber floors, have rainwater tanks and compostable toilets.

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Gosford 2250
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Tiny homes for the homeless

(RN Drive)

Homelessness at 'crisis point' in rural Australia, welfare groups say