Muslim women get on their bikes to ‘eliminate fear’

(702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
The Sydney Cycling Sisters are a group of Muslim women who gather for weekly riding sessions.On Sunday, more than a dozen Cycling Sisters will get on their bikes for their second Spring Cycle race from North Sydney to Homebush.Their message?”Muslim women are the same as any other women,” Ms Rahal said.Challenging ‘negative rhetoric’The occupational therapist and mother of four said the “negative Islamic rhetoric” in the past decade following terrorist attacks had scared a lot of people in the Muslim community.”You watched TV and saw Tony Abbott saying: ‘You’ve got to be on Team Australia’,” Ms Rahal said.”What does that mean? A few years ago Cindy Rahal was sitting in a shopping centre with her sister and a friend when a man approached her yelling: “There are so many f***ing Muslims around.”He threatened her with a crowbar before leaving and causing damage elsewhere in the centre.”He basically stood over me … and said, ‘have you ever seen a crowbar’ in a really menacing way,” Ms Rahal recalled.”It was a Thursday night — I thought I was safe.”The intimidation was very real, very scary.”This incident, as well as other verbal and physical confrontations experienced by her friends, prompted Ms Rahal to start a cycling group. It means there’s going to be some people who are not going to be included on this team. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
“Even though it’s a very small minority that do it, it’s enough to scare women.”I found that a lot of women stopped doing things for leisure, like going out and riding a bike.”Muslims are tired of saying this is not our religion. Photo:
Eaman Badaui from Canley Vale says she loves keeping fit and enjoys meeting women from “all walks of life”. External Link:

Sydney Cycling Sisters Facebook
“We’re saying we’re Muslim women and we’re free, we’re going to ride our bikes and we’re not going to assimilate the way you want us to assimilate.”We’re going to assimilate the way we want to with our hijabs on, while wearing modest clothes and observing our faith, because that’s important to us.”It doesn’t make us bad people and it doesn’t make us terrorists, it makes us people who enjoy life who don’t want to be criticised for what we wear.”Ms Rahal said she hoped more women of all fitness levels and ethnic and religious background would join the Cycling Sisters. Photo:
Cindy Rahal says the cycling group has given the women confidence. We are frustrated with not being heard.”It was a sentiment she put to Pauline Hanson during the ABC’s Q&A program and accused the senator of proliferating fear about Muslims.”With this cycling group, we’re trying to eliminate some of that fear,” Ms Rahal said.
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October 14, 2016 13:33:55

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Sydney Cycling Sisters is a group made up of Muslim women from across Sydney.

Whale helps calf caught in Gold Coast shark net

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A juvenile whale calf has been cut free after becoming entangled in a shark net off the Gold Coast.The four-metre humpback was trapped by its tail at Coolangatta Beach.Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol spokesman Mark Saul said conditions were calm, so too was the calf’s mother, which sped up the rescue.”Both the whales were very calm,” he said.”Mum had just pushed into the nets slightly to help keep the calf up on the surface which she was doing quite well.”After a few cuts, a bit of mesh away, they both just swam away to the south-east.”It swam away with its mother to the south, in good health and condition.”
By Matt Watson

Updated

October 15, 2016 18:18:56

Video: Juvenile humpback whale freed from shark nets off Gold Coast

(ABC News)

White rhino freed from tyre stuck around its horn

According to Aware Trust, the muscles a rhino uses to open its mouth are much weaker than those used to close it.In order to free the animal safely, the vets were forced to use a tranquiliser dart.”We found Mark, the dominant bull, lying close to his girlfriends, looking decidedly dejected and exhausted from his ordeal on this scorching hot day,” Aware Trust Zimbabwe said in a Facebook post.”Fortunately the tyre came off in a few minutes with man power, and we did not have to resort to cutting through it.”Eleven minutes later he was antidoted (sic) and grazing again as if nothing had happened.” Vets from Aware Trust Zimbabwe have rescued a white rhino after it trapped its snout in a washed-up car tyre.The rhino, a dominant bull named Mark, was unable to eat or drink with the tyre trapped around its snout.Park rangers called vets after the rhino was unable to free itself.The vets from Aware Trust, Keith and Lisa, travelled one-and-a-half hours to get to Mark. The lake near where the rhino was grazing is known for being polluted and its banks are regularly littered with nets and tyres.
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October 18, 2016 08:33:15

Video: Park rangers remove stuck tyre from rhino's snout

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Local paper plane championships off to a flyer

it was like a rainbow when we saw all the paper planes went into the air,” Mr Adler said.”You looked around and there was such a great buzz and vibe seeing all the kids happy.”They were connecting with their dads, helping fold the planes, and there wasn’t an iPad in sight.”The longest throw was recorded by local Haden Spencer with 34 metres.The current world record is 69 metres, held by Joe Ayoob and aircraft designer John Collins from the US.”Haden’s plane was an extreme dart which means the wings were folded in on itself,” Mr Adler told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Steve Austin.”His brute force and minimal wind resistance gave him the ability to throw it like a javelin … External Link:

The Australian movie Paper Planes inspired the Brisbane family to start their own competition. Photo:
Each competitor makes their own plane to use in the competition. I’m just the wingman.”
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The family raised more than $1,000 for local charities, including the RSPCA and the AEIOU Foundation.Next year they hope to make the event bigger and invite one of the actors from the film to come and be part of it.”We also want the Scouts or other mums and dads to come and help out,” Mr Adler said.”We want it to become a perpetual community event that is held year in and year out.” it was a big effort.”A family affairMr Adler said the film Paper Planes, which follows a young boy from Western Australia who dreams of competing in the World Paper Plane Championships, motivated him and his two sons to start a local competition. (Facebook: Up Up Upper Mt Gravatt Paper Plane Championships)
“When we saw the movie it connected with us and I wanted to teach my boys how to build something from nothing,” he said.”Laptops and iPads make children disconnected from the community and I wanted to change that.”I thought if I could teach them how to start an inaugural paper plane competition, how cool would that be?”Mr Adler said the competition had taught his sons life-changing skills.”I loved seeing my eight-year-old make a float for the sausage sizzle and he counted the money perfectly.”My youngest son is the managing director of the event and my nine-year-old is the creative director. “It was exciting to see all the different colour paper … A father inspired by a recent Australian film release has held a paper plane competition in Brisbane to encourage children to put down their laptops and connect.Dan Adler and his sons organised the Up Up Upper Mt Gravatt Paper Plane Championships held at the weekend.More than 150 children competed in the longest distance, hang time and expression session events.
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Jessica Hinchliffe

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October 17, 2016 14:21:39

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More than 150 children lined up with their handmade paper planes in Brisbane. (Facebook: Up Up Upper Mt Gravatt Paper Plane Championships)

Missing sheepdog returns home just in time to represent Australia

But Scooter the sheepdog had a less than desirable lead-up to the event. “I let them out for a wee and picked up the two things I wanted, called the dogs to take them for a run up the road — and one missing! The competition brought in more than 200 sheepdogs and trainers from all over Australia and New Zealand. “I had rubber boots on, and when I got in the old shed … all the water had run in and the water was over my rubber boots where the pups were.”The mother had lifted some up on the ledges, and I’m one [puppy] short, and I just saw a wriggle of water and a little nose sticking out. He said with Scooter being nine she would sign off soon, but he hoped to have a few more years competing before then.”I keep feeling my pulse and it’s pumping along well, so I’m hoping to get a few more in a couple more years,” he said. (Supplied: Nan Lloyd)
Scooter the survivorRunning off for three days is not the only challenge Scooter has had to overcome.When she was a puppy, Mr Hines saved her from drowning in a large storm that hit the farm.”When the pups were only a week old, a thunderstorm was coming … the storm opened up and after about 20 minutes there was water everywhere, and [I thought] I’d better go and check those pups,” he said. “I must have only been four or five minutes from when she left. “But running through the long grass she wouldn’t hear the whistle, and I’m the whistle maker of the nation, so I wore out about three trying to find her.”Even with the entire district on the lookout, Scooter stayed away for three days before returning home.”The district [people] were amazing. “I usually sell them when they’re eight or nine to a good home, but I think she might have to stay.” Despite the best efforts of Scooter and Mr Hines, the New Zealand team took out the Trans-Tasman Test for the third time running. (Supplied: Nan Lloyd)
Mr Hines and Scooter have been a successful team, taking home a Captain Payne and a Beatson and Beatson trophy in Victoria. “There were six pups and we took them in and washed them to warm them up, and [took] a hair dryer to dry them.”And three years later the two of them were first and second in a novice [sheepdog competition], and two were first and second in the improver.”

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David Hines (R) and his border collie Scooter prepare to take on the Kiwis. Scooter, a black and white border collie, went missing from her farm in St Arnaud, Victoria, just a week before she was due to fly to Western Australia to compete for the nation in the Trans-Tasman Test against New Zealand.Her trainer, David Hines, said although it was not the first time Scooter had run off, she had never stayed out so long.”She just sneaks off looking for fun, looking for sheep,” Mr Hines said.”And I know to keep my eye on her, but I wasn’t staying at the farm long. “She’s not just a dog, she’s representing Australia, so we had to find her.”

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Australia hosted New Zealand at the Trans-Tasman Test sheepdog trials in Northam, Western Australia. They all came out and did the fence lines, looked up roads, and they drove,” Mr Hines said.”They put it on the pages of the fire brigade so all the district knew, and then it went to pages of districts, and they even got it onto the ABC to spread the word that Scooter is lost.
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A trophy-winning sheepdog has had an unusual lead-up to a major championship, going missing for three days before she was due to represent her country.The Supreme Australian Sheepdog Championship was held in Northam, about 100 kilometres east of Perth, last week.
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Michelle Stanley

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October 20, 2016 10:57:42

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David Hines says Scooter must love to play hide and seek.
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A Big Country: Sheep dog rivalry in trans-Tasman series

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Woman stuck in bath for four days rescued after local cafe notices absence

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An elderly woman who was trapped in her bath for four days has been rescued by police in the UK after a waitress at her favourite cafe noticed her absence and became worried for her safety.According to a report by the Essex Echo, 87-year-old Doreen Mann became stuck in her bath when one morning she found she could not lift herself out.”It was frightening in a sense because I didn’t know how long I would be stuck there,” she told the Echo.But when a waitress at her local cafe, Tomassi’s in Southend, realised that she had not seen Ms Mann in three days, she called the police.”She didn’t come in for a few days and then she didn’t come in on Saturday like she always does, but I thought perhaps her cousin from Chelmsford was visiting her,” Sonia Congrave said.”On the Monday she didn’t come in and the best thing I did was call the police because I was concerned and luckily I had her address so the police went to check if she was ok.”Ms Congrave, 39, said Ms Mann had bruising on her knees after trying to get out of the bath and survived by drinking water from the tap and covering herself with towels or topping up the hot water when she got cold.”All she wanted afterwards was her cake and a cup of tea,” Ms Congrave said.She said she had since bought Ms Mann a mobile phone in case of any emergencies in the future.
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October 18, 2016 11:47:45

Sarbi the bomb sniffer dog preserved forever at War Memorial

Treasure Trove: Sarbi the explosives detection dog

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(Supplied: Australian War Memorial)
While Sarbi is not the first dog in the AWM’s collection, Ms Peek said she reflected the changing nature of war.”Nowadays so much warfare is encounters [with] improvised explosive devices.”Dogs are trained to sniff out an explosive device up to 100 metres away.”Some of them of course unfortunately have been blown up by the device … Photo:
Sarbi has been preserved by a taxidermist for permanent display at the AWM. Photo:
Sarbi on duty with her handler before she went missing in Afghanistan. they actually have saved a lot of [soldiers’] lives.” (Supplied: Department of Defence)
“They put out some of David’s sweaty clothes outside the base hoping that she would come back,” Ms Peek said.”She was eventually declared missing in action after three weeks when they couldn’t find her.”Thirteen months later an American soldier spotted a dog he thought might be Sarbi in an Afghan village.He tested her with military commands and, after she responded, negotiated for her return.”It seems that she had belonged to a village chief who had treasured her,” Ms Peek said.”She was in very good condition so they’d looked after her — she’d even put on weight.”But once they realised she was a valuable bargaining chip I suppose they did want some money in return.”Sarbi spent months in quarantine in Afghanistan and Australia before being reunited with her handler.She was retired from the Army and lived with Simpson, now a Warrant Officer, as his family’s pet, before dying from a brain tumour in 2015 at the age of 12.Preserved with paw upWarrant Officer Simpson wanted Sarbi preserved so visitors could learn her story as part of AWM’s new Middle East display, which includes 220 items from its own collection and on loan from current and former Defence Force personnel.He advised that Sarbi should be depicted in a customary pose, smiling with one paw raised.The taxidermist used fur from his own border collie to cover a shaved spot on the back of Sarbi’s head. Sarbi, the explosive detection dog who was famously lost and found in Afghanistan, has been preserved as a key exhibit at the Australian War Memorial (AWM).The black Labrador-Newfoundland cross went missing on September 2, 2008 when Australian special forces were ambushed by the Taliban while on patrol with US and Afghan troops in Uruzgan province.During the subsequent nine-hour battle, the clip that attached Sarbi’s harness to her handler, Corporal David Simpson, was shot off.Spooked by an explosion, she disappeared in the chaos.Corporal Simpson was one of nine Australians wounded in the fight; SAS trooper Mark Donaldson was later awarded the Victoria Cross for drawing enemy fire away from the casualties.Lost in Uruzgan province for 13 monthsAWM curator Jane Peek said after the wounded were evacuated, the soldiers searched for Sarbi.
666 ABC Canberra

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Louise Maher

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October 18, 2016 16:40:19

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Sarbi trotting away from a US Army Chinook helicopter at Tarin Kowt in November 2009. (Supplied: Department of Defence)

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Bird lovers flock to empty Darwin arcade

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Julio and his cockatoo Paulie enjoy the sunset at Nightcliff. (Supplied: Sarah Mackie)
Julio came to Darwin by boat as a teenager seeking asylum from East Timor and said he thinks of Paulie as a little brother when he is missing his family.Ornithologist Amanda Lilleyman is pictured in her “office” on the Darwin mudflats and spoke about the five black-tailed godwits she wanted to get tattooed on an as-yet-undecided location.And Helen Gordon posed with her bantam rooster Elvis, one of many chooks who are at home on her 12-acre block near Coolalinga. Photo:
Amanda Lilleyman in her “office” on the Darwin mudflats. (Supplied: Sarah Mackie)
“I grew up in Darwin on an egg farm and the eggs back then were in cages, so a battery chicken farm,” she said.”It’s a little bit different at my house, my chickens are all free ranging.”Transforming spaces, surprising peopleThe portrait project’s creative producer, Johanna Bell, described herself as “a bit of a bird nerd”.She is also interested in public art and has been inspired by the Renew Newcastle effort to revitalise empty city streets through art projects.With the help of a grant from the City of Darwin’s public art program, she worked with photographer Sarah Mackie and projectionist Pier Filippo Galetti to bring her vision to life.”Temporary public art is all about transforming places and surprising people,” she said.”Lots of locals use the Anthony Plaza as a thoroughfare and I love the idea of them lucking upon these intimate portraits of strangers’ lives during their lunch break.”I wanted to create a work that changes the way people think about disused spaces in Darwin.” The funny thing about Nathan Richardson is that he can fly further than his yellow and blue macaw, Skye.He is a commercial pilot and has flown all over the Top End as part of his day job.By comparison, eight-month-old Skye doesn’t fly much further than up onto the air-conditioner and back, occasionally.”Skye is clipped, so it’s a bit of conjecture at some times but it is for her own safety,” Nathan said.”She’s quite happy just walking around and chewing stuff and she’s got full run of the house.”Nathan and Skye are among a handful of Darwin locals and their pet birds captured in a series of photograph and video portraits that are being projected onto an empty shopfront in one of the quiet arcades in the CBD.There is also Julio Carses Da Costa, known to Nightcliff joggers as The Cockatoo Man, who cycles the foreshore with his bird Paulie.
(Supplied: Sarah Mackie) By

Jacqueline Breen

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October 18, 2016 17:42:17

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Nathan and his pet macaw Skye.

Pop art unicorn a winner for next Adelaide Fringe

By Nicola Gage

Posted

October 19, 2016 11:24:11
More Fringe shows will be announced in early December and the event will run from February 17 until March 19. A pop-art poster depicting a unicorn has been chosen to promote the next Adelaide Fringe festival.It is the work of Barossa Valley-based designer Jennifer Rimbault, who is delighted to have beaten about 200 other entries from around the world.”The creature in my poster isn’t what people would expect — it is quirky and unusual, just like the Fringe,” she said.”I was so surprised my design was chosen and I feel blessed that it will be used to promote such a loved event.”Fringe director Heather Croall agreed the winner captured the magical spirit of the annual arts event.”The Adelaide Fringe is a such a great transformation of the city of Adelaide — it’s a real magical festival wonderland that takes over,” she said.”We just felt that this winning poster entry really embodied the spirit [of] fun and experiencing the unexpected.”She said Fringe staff were excited when they found out, after the judging, that the poster was by a South Australian-based artist.”We get hundreds of entries and when we choose the winner we don’t know where they’re from. It was wonderful to realise it was a local, and a young designer,” she said.Tickets are already available for about 40 of next year’s Fringe shows. Performers will include playwright/singer Amanda Palmer, comedian Dave Hughes and the acrobatics team Cirque Africa.”There’s cabaret, there’s comedy, there’s circus, there’s theatre and as always with the Adelaide Fringe there’s every genre in every size of venue imaginable,” Ms Croall said.She warned some shows would be likely to sell out quickly, as in past years.”We look like we have broken the record in terms of number of shows that have registered so we are set probably to break the ticket selling record again,” she said.
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Jennifer Rimbault thinks her poster captures the quirky spirit of the Fringe.
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Wild Tasmanian devils defy the odds to beat facial cancer: scientists

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October 20, 2016 09:09:24

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The discovery of wild devils that have beaten the cancer is a scientific first. (Supplied: UTAS)
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Professor Woods said the discovery was an encouraging sign that a vaccine could be effective.”It’s important to make sure that we can do something to protect that other 90 per cent that don’t appear to be responding,” he said.While the development is encouraging, researchers warned there was still a long road ahead.”This is a response that occurred in the wild, in a very fast timeframe,” Dr Hamede said.”These evolutionary changes in response usually take hundreds of thousands of years.”The study supported the findings of another research project that found the species was evolving at a genomic level to protect itself.”So this is another piece of information that the devils are actually adapting to coexist with DFTD,” Dr Hamede said.”Hopefully we’ll start seeing more and more devils managing to resist DFTD or survive longer with DFTD.” Scientists have discovered wild Tasmanian devils that have recovered from the facial cancer that has decimated the species over the past 20 years.Four devils in a wild population in the state’s north-west contracted the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) before successfully fighting it off.Another two from the same population beat the cancer only to be reinfected, according to a report published in Biology Letters yesterday.Researchers have been monitoring the population for more than 10 years, capturing and taking blood samples every three months.Dr Rodrigo Hamede from the University of Tasmania said he hoped this was the beginning of a much brighter future for the devils. We thought, ‘Oh no, it must have been a misdiagnosis’, but the evidence is quite convincing that the tumours did disappear,” he said.”Up until now we’ve had no evidence that devils could respond on their own to the tumour.”

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There is now evidence the devils are adapting to DFTD, says Dr Rodrigo Hamede. (Supplied: UTAS)
Questions remain as to how the devils kicked cancerResearchers have been analysing the population for several years and the animals that recovered are believed to have died from natural causes.Professor Woods said they were still trying to understand exactly how they beat the cancer.”These few devils seem to be able to modify the tumour cells so the immune system can recognise it,” he said.”We suspect that they produced chemicals called cytokines and that’s what we’re sort of testing in our laboratory at the moment.”

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There is now more hope a vaccine for DFTD will be effective. “To find this small proportion of devils that can actually fight back and recover from DFTD, it is excellent news,” he said.”It is rewarding and it also puts the future in a more, sort of encouraging scenario.”Professor Greg Woods from the Menzies Institute for Medical Research said it was an “incredibly exciting” discovery.”At first, we didn’t believe it.
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Dairy farmer raises enough money for a milk processor

(ABC Rural: Lara Webster)
“It is 1,000 litres at a time [you can batch pasteurise] so you bring it up to around 63 degrees for half an hour and then cool it back down,” Mr Fortescue said. The processer should enable him to produce 500,000 litres of milk per year, all of which he plans to sell into the local market. So far the dairy farmer has raised $40,000 and that is enough to start the first phase of his processing plant and buy a batch processer and possibly a bottle filler. With the current state of the market, the last thing most dairy farmers would be doing right now is investing in more infrastructure — unless you are Dale Fortescue. “If we get kicking along and we want more milk and the money is there I’m sure they’ll probably start up again, that is what I’m hoping,” Mr Fortescue said.”I would have to buy more equipment to hold the milk so I could then pasteurise it but they would just bring it to me and I would be like the processor for them.” Earlier this year he launched a crowdfunding campaign to try and set up a new processing plant, and after some generous donations, it may be well on his way. He hopes the local dairy industry may even re-build itself. Phase two still requires more crowdfunding, and that will include safe food recommendations, extra parts for the bottle filler and building the rest of the new dairy. Photo:
There are only three dairy farms left in Eungella, and Dale Fortescue says this is his last chance to save his business. But just getting to this point is hard for Mr Fortescue to believe.”I thought I would have to try and beg at my bank … The north Queensland dairy farmer is only one of three left on top of Eungella, above Mackay.Mr Fortescue supplies Parmalat with his milk, but with only a few farms left on the Eungella Range he does not know how much longer the milk tankers will keep coming.Next year that number falls to two but Mr Fortescue has been working hard to try and save his family business. but a lot of people talk about this crowdfunding and a lot of people have got behind it.”Mr Fortescue estimates in total he will need more than $150,000, but now he can see light at what has been a very dark tunnel.
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Meecham Philpott and Lara Webster

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October 20, 2016 14:49:37

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Eungella dairy farmer Dale Fortescue is one step closer to creating a processing plant.
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Native broad-toothed rat makes a comeback in the ACT

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A study by the ACT Government and the Australian National University found the species has recolonised burnt out areas and returned to pre-fire distribution.”A decade on, the habitat has recovered remarkably,” ACT Government senior ecologist Dr Murray Evans told 666 ABC Canberra’s Drive program. Rat populations are not usually something to celebrate but an increase in broad-toothed rat numbers in the ACT has researchers excited.The broad-toothed rat is a medium-sized native rodent which lives in alpine and subalpine swamps and grasslands.The rodent was nearly wiped out during the 2003 bushfires which destroyed its habitat in areas of Namadgi National Park. “Now that the habitat has rebounded, the broad-toothed rat has rebounded as well.”‘Resilient’ ecosystem bounces back The rise of the rat is an indicator of wider recovery at Namadgi National Park.
(Australian Museum: G A Hoye ) 666 ABC Canberra

Updated

October 21, 2016 10:14:57

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The broad-toothed rat is strictly herbivorous, feeding primarily on grass at all times of the year.
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Dr Murray Evans discusses the return of the native broad-toothed rat

(Drive)

“It’s very important to have areas that are well connected ecologically where animals can move through from one habitat to another to recolonise if those populations are lost,” he said. Photo:
Namadgi National Park ecosystems have bounced back from the 2003 bushfires. “It’s also important to have large areas like Namadgi that are conserved — if Namadgi was highly broken up, there’s a greater chance that you’ll lose species such as the broad-toothed rat.” “Species we’ve seen return [to Namadgi] are arboreal marsupials like gliders, possums — there’s good populations of those.”Some species are still struggling, like the corroboree frog, but overall I’d have to say the report card for Namadgi is looking pretty good.”I don’t know of any species that we’ve actually completely lost due to those 2003 fires.”Still under threat The broad-toothed rat is rare in the ACT and is in decline nationally. “As well as climate change, which reduces habitat in alpine areas, the species faces other risks such as predation by foxes, habitat degradation by feral pigs and the spread of exotic grasses and plant foot fungus,” Dr Evans said. “Our ecosystems are pretty resilient to things like fire,” Dr Evans said. (ABC News: Craig Allen)
He said protecting habitat and national park corridors would go a long way to securing the rat’s future.

Women’s football pioneer nominated as NSW Local Hero

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“I want the pay to be better than the boys,” she laughed.”I’d like to see more women have a seat at the table in women’s football, whether it’s in administration or as elite athletes.”Ms Karra-Hassan said she was particularly proud of being a positive role model for women in sport.But does she feel like a local hero?”It’s a weird thing to say yes, but when I walk around the local community people always recognise me,” she said.”They pat me on the back and say: ‘We really love the football club, we really love what you do, keep being a positive ambassador for western Sydney and local communities.'”When that happens to you, sometimes not even in western Sydney, it speaks volumes.”Other NSW finalists for Australia’s Local Hero awards include palliative care innovator Meredith Dennis, farming aid coordinator Brendan Farrell and community volunteer Josephine Peter. Amna Karra-Hassan still remembers her first game of Australian Rules football.It was 2011, the newly established Auburn Tigers were playing their first game, and she had no idea what she was doing.”We played Sydney University and we got pumped at least 150 to nil,” Ms Karra-Hassan said.”We didn’t even know simple rules, they were telling us, ‘You can’t run there’.”We came off really happy but we thought, ‘Wow, we’re so out of our depth’.”Five years later Ms Karra-Hassan has overcome more than just the obstacles of getting tackled on the field. The 28-year-old is the co-founder and president of the Auburn Giants — formerly named the Auburn Tigers — and an ambassador for the Greater Western Sydney Giants national women’s team.She has also been named a New South Wales finalist in the 2017 Australia’s Local Hero awards.”It’s such a lovely surprise that someone went to the effort for the work I’ve done with the football club,” she said.”I love footy and what it’s been able to do for my life personally and what it does for the lives of the girls who play with us.”Ms Karra-Hassan grew up in western Sydney and is the eldest of six children.She works as a community engagement officer with the Australian Federal Police and regularly speaks in schools as a mentor.In 2012, she was nominated for the Young Women of the West Award and recognised for encouraging women, especially Muslim women, to get involved in AFL and sport.Overcoming footy politicsWhen she first became involved in women’s Aussie Rules, Ms Karra-Hassan said she had to deal with “a lot of politics and pushbacks about whether football was a space for women”.However the game has since “moved forward” at a rapid pace.The GWS Giants are one of eight foundation teams to start the AFL national women’s league next year, while Ms Karra-Hassan said pay discussions were underway for professional female AFL athletes. The story of the Auburn Giants Watch how Amna Karra-Hassan and the Auburn Giants climbed to the top of the ladder in this ABC Compass episode.
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Amanda Hoh

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October 20, 2016 14:57:30

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Amna Karra-Hassan encourages women from all backgrounds to get involved in sport. (Supplied: Amna Karra-Hassan)

Rare animal art to be shown in Adelaide

By Tom Fedorowytsch

Posted

October 20, 2016 16:35:45

Rarely-seen animal illustrations from the extensive archives of the British Museum are going on show at the South Australian Museum.The Curious Beasts exhibition includes artworks that range from the beautiful to the bizarre and span more than four centuries.To add to the display, the SA Museum has dug out dozens of specimens from its own broad animals collection.”We’ve brought things out — some of them have never been seen on public display before,” Museum director Brian Oldman said.”We have very rich collections, we have very diverse audiences, so what we want to do is to put on a really exciting program … so there are different things for different tastes.”Artists approximate realitySome of the works are up to 600 years old and by artists including Albrecht Durer, Francisco Goya, George Stubbs and the Dutch master Rembrandt.Esther Chadwick from the British Museum said Durer produced a rhinoceros artwork in the 16th century, despite never actually having seen the species.”He approximates what he thinks the rhino should look like — it’s not quite right, and that then becomes the sort of authorial image and it gets repeated and repeated and repeated and it’s almost like it becomes a fact itself,” she said.Ms Chadwick said there were curious differences between the hand-drawn animals and others displayed after taxidermists had done their work.”Where print makers and observers get it a little bit wrong, we find that so compelling just to be able to see that little gap where the mismatch happens,” she said.The exhibition has visited five locations around the world, and after the Adelaide event the art will be returned to the British Museum’s vaults for safekeeping.Curious Beasts will run until next February.
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(ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch) Photo:
An artwork of a rhinoceros at the Curious Beasts exhibition.
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Adelaide 5000
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The sea dragon had more than 300 teeth. (ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch)
(ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch) Photo:
Birds on display as part of the Curious Beasts exhibition at the SA Museum.

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These snakes are more of the Curious Beasts on display. (ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch)
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The Hog is a Rembrandt work from 1643. (ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch)
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Get up close with a kiwi at the Curious Beasts exhibition. (ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch)
Curious Beasts go on display at Adelaide exhibition
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A jewel beetle on display at the Curious Beasts exhibition in Adelaide. (ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch)
(ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch) Photo:
These Curious Beasts from the Adelaide exhibition are eclectus parrots.

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These koalas are part of the Curious Beasts exhibition. (ABC News: Tom Fedorowytsch)

Rare spiny daisy back from brink in South Australia

(ABC News: Isabel Dayman)
“We now have almost 100 plants here and a few more down the bottom [of the reserve] and luckily, they’re doing really well,” Ms Kieskamp said.”They’re flowering and they even have a few … little babies.”They live in quite a harsh climate but they still manage to thrive.”I really respect these little plants [because] they’re not very showy. Photo:
A spiny daisy plant in bloom. They have tiny little flowers, but in their own way they’re pretty special.” Photo:
Banrock Station wetland staff Tim Field and Christophe Tourenq are delighted at the spiny daisy’s success. Photo:
The first cuttings of spiny daisy were planted at Banrock Station in 2014. (ABC News: Isabel Dayman)
Conservationists are now working to transplant the spiny daisy to as many different locations as possible, to ensure the species will not be wiped out by events such as bushfires. (ABC News: Isabel Dayman)
Ranger Tim Field said the 360 original cuttings taken from the mid-north and planted at Banrock Station had now exploded to about 1,500 plants. (ABC News: Isabel Dayman)
“We always talk about species disappearing and it’s all doom and gloom, [but] I think the future is pretty bright.”It’s a very positive and optimistic story for the conservation of species in Australia.”The spiny daisy was first recorded during the Burke and Wills expedition in the 1860s, and was spotted again near Overland Corner in South Australia in 1910.For many years it was presumed to be extinct, before being rediscovered in 1999 when a farmer spotted a plant at the edge of his paddock in the state’s mid-north. Cuttings are being distributed to parts of the mid-Murray region and elsewhere in the Riverland, in the hope the spiny daisy will eventually grow freely between the mid-north and Menindee Lakes in outback New South Wales.Among the other Riverland sites is Wilabalangaloo Reserve, near Berri.Berri Barmera Landcare project officer Helga Kieskamp said it was exciting to be involved in the spiny daisy replenishment program. “For a plant that’s critically endangered, it’s remarkably good at looking after itself,” Mr Field said.”We do a bit of upkeep in the form of weeding, and the original sites are fenced off to give them a bit of protection from kangaroos and things like that.”On the whole, they seem to do a pretty good job of it themselves.”

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Conservationists hope the spiny daisy will eventually grow between SA’s mid-north and outback NSW. There are only six [genetic] individuals left in the wild,” Mr Tourenq said. It was once believed to be extinct, but the native spiny daisy is now blooming strongly across parts of South Australia’s Riverland.A program to replenish the critically-endangered species started at Banrock Station in the Riverland in 2014.Wetland manager Christophe Tourenq said the program had been designed to bring the small, prickly plant back from the brink of actual extinction, and had so far enjoyed incredible success.”It’s one of the rarest plants in Australia and on Earth.
ABC Riverland

By

Isabel Dayman

Posted

October 20, 2016 17:52:28

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The spiny daisy was believed to be extinct until it was rediscovered in SA’s mid-north in 1999. (ABC News: Isabel Dayman)
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Waikerie 5330