Saying g’day with emojis: App explains quirks of Aussie culture

612 ABC Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Updated

November 04, 2016 11:31:06

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Marvin Reid’s emoji set shows sides of Australia the wider world doesn’t always see. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
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If Australian lifestyle and culture was an emoji set, what would it look like?Developer Marvin Reid has spent 12 months creating the AussiEmoji app that features cane toads, Uluru and meat pies.Originally from Jamaica, Mr Reid migrated to Queensland eight years ago and became an Australian citizen in 2014.He said he wanted to create emojis that explained the quirks of Australian culture as well as encompassing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. Photo:
Emojis include meat pies, Uluru and Indigenous symbols. (Supplied: Marvin Reid)
“The first [emoji] I created was a kangaroo with an expression of surprise.” Mr Reid worked closely with local Indigenous designer Charles Omeenyo. (Supplied: Marvin Reid)
Since being released last month Mr Reid’s emojis have featured on the iTunes download chart.”There’s million of apps submitted every week and it’s good to know that out of those millions of apps that an Australian-made app that showcases Australia can be featured,” he said.”I feel really proud.” (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
“I was always really interested and in love with the Australian way,” he said.”The vast history and Indigenous art made me really fall in love with my country.”After becoming an Australian citizen I wanted to create something that showcased Australia to the world in a unique and fun way.”Indigenous culture representedMr Reid said his aim was to create an emoji set that showed sides of Australia the wider world did not always see.”My favourite emoji is the one that showcases the Australian and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island flag,” he said.”It shows the world that Australia is not just one thing. Photo:
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander designers have been part of the creative process. “I tell him my idea and then he puts his ideas together and we take a few days to get the design done,” he said.”We’re all based here in Brisbane and it’s a Queensland-created app going worldwide.”More than just an emojiMr Reid said there was also a serious side to the emojis.In the next update, each emoji will come with a factsheet explaining to users the background and meaning of each icon.”It’s not just something to make cute symbols that no-one uses,” he said.”I created it so that we use it everyday and to help Australians share their culture and history to people overseas, to show what we’re about.”

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A Queensland cane toad dressed in State of Origin gear is one of the emojis created.

It’s story time with Russ the Bus

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I like reading because it isn’t a time waster and it’s fun,” — Ethan, 7.”I like the pictures the most because illustrators really bring out the magic out of books and the words because sometimes you can’t see what the author is thinking in the words,” Isabella, 12. When eight-year-old student Rohit Igoor writes a story, it is usually about dinosaurs or creatures “because they’re cool”.For 10-year-old Emily Fisk, fantasy books are her stories of choice while she has recently written a story about Ruby the gypsy.These are the sorts of ideas and storytelling skills Australian authors are hoping to inspire in students aboard Russ the Story Bus, a travelling library that will make its way around schools in western Sydney and regional New South Wales for the next six weeks.It is one of a number of initiatives in the Children’s Festival of Moving Stories that launched this week.The bus, which has been painted by artist Shaun Tan, houses a library full of children’s books that students can take home. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
Inspiring storytellingThis is the third year the Children’s Festival of Moving Stories has been held and the first time the Russ the Story Bus will visit regional schools.It is a key part of the Sydney Writers Festival’s focus on developing literary skills and introducing young people to authors and illustrators.Along with the bus, workshops and author talks will be held at libraries in western Sydney for primary and secondary students.”The fact we can visit the schools is a bonus for the children who may come from families where English is a second language and they don’t have access to books in the same way,” Clare Sawyer, head of children’s programs, said.”We hope [the bus] can prompt they’re imagination, make them think more loosely and widely and more innovatively, to think about where stories come from and what stories they can make up for themselves.” (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
Travelling with the bus each week will be an author or illustrator.James Roy, who has written books like Captain Mack and Billy Mack’s War, said much of his inspiration came from what he saw around him.”It’s really easy to think that stories are all involving heroes or people who can do amazing things or have wacky adventures,” Roy said.”But in actual fact a lot of the more important stories are kids’ own stories and the things they struggle with every day.”I’ve been all over the world talking to kids about writing stories and it doesn’t matter where you go … Photo:
Children can browse Russ the Bus and choose a book to take home. the same things worry them and the same things excite them.”My favourite book is …For the students at Seven Hills Public School, their stories of choice when they hopped into Russ the Bus were varied.”I love reading about Ella and Olivia because it’s about her diaries and she’s also seven years old,” — Maxine, 7.”My favourite books are about finding ways to do things and having to choose your own way to go. Photo:
James Roy says he draws inspiration from the everyday experiences of kids.

702 ABC Sydney

By

Amanda Hoh

Posted

November 04, 2016 14:21:08

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Students from Seven Hills Public School explore Russ the Story Bus. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
Breaking Barriers inspiring Aboriginal youth in western Sydney
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91yo swimmer ready for Masters games

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(Supplied: Pan Pacific Masters Games) ABC Gold Coast

By Damien Larkins and Nicole Dyer

Posted

November 04, 2016 16:01:48

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Don Robertson has been swimming since the age of five.
I want to beat them,” he said.The 2016 Pan Pacific Masters Games are on at the Gold Coast from November 5–13. At the age of 91, Don Robertson is one of the oldest competitors at the 2016 Pan Pacific Masters Games on the Gold Coast. Having said that, I hope they’re not too good. External Link:

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Mr Robertson will be swimming in six events and, although training has been hell, he is ready to “bring it on”.The Gold Coast local has been swimming since he was five years old.”My mum took my water wings off me and told me ‘You can swim into the shore’,” he said.”After going under a couple of times I think even at five I realised, Don, you can swim.”He dog-paddled into the shore and never donned the water wings again.Since then he has competed at a national level and spent 30 years as a swim official, including being a starter at the 1982 Brisbane Commonwealth Games.Now he swims a kilometre every day in the pool at his retirement home.”It’s too easy to sit back and say I’m too old, but I’ve thought, no, I can do that,” he said. Photo:
Don Robertson is ready to bring it on at the 2016 Pan Pacific Masters Games. (Supplied: Pan Pacific Masters Games)
Normally swimming is a chance to relax, but once Mr Robertson had entered the games, he said he got the idea he needed to train.”It’s been hell,” he said with a laugh.”I’m glad that the games are eventually here so that I can stop training.”The nonagenarian is fit as a fiddle, having never smoked or drunk alcohol, except once during a year-long stint in the army stationed in the 40-plus degree heat at Woomera.”The only cold drink was a beer so I started to drink one middy beer every afternoon after work,” he said.Mr Robertson did that for 12 months and when he left, his mates said he had the taste and would never give it up.”I said I don’t like the taste, I only drink it cause it’s cold and wet,” he said.Mr Robertson is looking forward to the masters competition.”I’d like some opposition in my age group.

Interfaith cooperation in action in Mount Isa

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The prayer room at Good Shepherd Parish used to be set aside for the local historical society, but it is now used by Mount Isa’s Islamic community. (ABC North West Qld: Hailey Renault)
Father Lowcock said his decision to allow the Islamic community to use the space did not come without contention.”I suppose one of the issues was, do you make it public?” he said.”You don’t want any backlash against them or against us, and there have been some concerns raised by people — even someone from out of town has rung me about it.”

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“Put off thy shoes” can be found in both the Holy Qu’ran and in the Bible. Regardless of the practice, we respect each other,” he said.”All the religion is spreading the peace — nothing wrong with that, so we should love each other.” He grew up in Bangladesh but has been in Australia for the past 14 years.Mr Chowdhury said, before the church opened its doors, the Mount Isa Islamic community improvised locations for prayer.”Before we got a room over here we used to go to some other friend’s place or any other place — we used to pray there,” he said.”So since we got this one, we come here all the time so that’s very fortunate for us.”As Muslims we have to pray five times a day and that’s what we do — we gather here and pray to Allah, and we are all happy because now we openly come any time, whenever we want to.”Mr Chowdhury was aware of negative stereotypes often attached to his faith, and believed positive examples of religious harmony helped dispel the myth that Islam was dangerous.”We invite other people in [from] different faiths, so … if they want they can come and join with us and they can see what we do and how we practise, and what the real Muslims are.””That’s what we want to spread — across the world — that Islam means peace,” he said. (ABC North West Qld: Hailey Renault)
Jahed Chowdhury is a local Muslim. (ABC North West Qld: Hailey Renault)
Father Lowcock said, as much as the move was motivated by the need to find a space for locals to pray, it also demonstrated a symbolic gesture to bring the town closer.And he encouraged other religious leaders to follow suit.”I think there was a bit of a surprise element for people and they wondered ‘Should we be doing that?'” Father Lowcock said.”But I also think, in this day and age, [we need to] lead by some example, so we don’t just give way to the fears in our world, but we give way to what’s going to bring life.”If this is going to bring life to our community, I’d rather see us united rather than divided, I’d rather see us somehow coming together and praying, rather than just be a community that separates people from one side of town to the other,” he said.With a shared devotion to worship, Mr Chowdhury echoed a similar statement.”We live close together and in good harmony and that’s what we are human for. (ABC North West Qld: Hailey Renault)
According to Father Lowcock, the questions stem from misunderstanding and a fear of Islamic extremism and terrorism.”The question in the back of everyone’s mind [is] ‘What’s ISIS all about?'” he said.”I think every time people mention the word ‘Muslim’ or ‘Islam’, they immediately think of ISIS.”[But] rather than create the climate of fear in our world we need to create the dialogue and the climate of goodwill.”

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Jahed Chowdhury in the prayer room with a picture of the Kaaba, the building at the centre of Al-Masjid al-Haram mosque in Mecca, on the wall. A single beige demountable fitted with not much more than an air conditioner, a few chairs, and a patchwork of woven mats turned to face Mecca has become an outback symbol of religious hope.The Good Shepherd Catholic church in the remote Queensland mining town of Mount Isa has offered space in its parish building to the local Islamic community for use as a prayer room.Muslims and Catholics pray just metres apart.”Over the years a number of people have asked ‘Is there a place or a space in Mount Isa for a prayer room?'” Father Mick Lowcock said.”A couple of the people who I know fairly well approached me and sort of said ‘Is it possible for us to use one of the rooms?'”

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Father Michael Lowcock has offered a space to Mount Isa’s Islamic community as a gesture of unity. (ABC North West Qld: Hailey Renault)
Father Lowcock said the relationship also spoke of the true multiculturalism of outback Queensland.”Last Sunday I just looked around and there were 18 different nationalities I counted just at one of our services, and I think they’re only a part of the community of Mount Isa,” he said.”The Islamic society too is made up of a lot of people from different countries.”I know some Catholics are married to Muslims so there’s a whole sense of ‘How we do show support for one another?’ in this.”

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Good Shepherd Catholic Parish in Mount Isa is hoping to lead by example.
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ABC North West Qld

By

Hailey Renault

and

Harriet Tatham

Updated

November 05, 2016 15:50:40

Video: Mt Isa chooses interfaith cooperation over community division

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Wiggles visit puts Aboriginal community in global spotlight

It’s been an enriching experience for us.”The Wiggles were in Yarrabah to record for the Wiggle Wiggle Wiggle television series, which will shine a global spotlight on the remote far north community. “Musically, it was so lovely to hear.”The power of musicYellow Wiggle Emma Watkins said she was touched by the Yarrabah reception and overwhelmed by how well the local children knew The Wiggles’ back catalogue. We’ve never been here before.” Mr Schrieber said while The Wiggles’ visit was a day of excitement for the students, there would be long-term benefits.”The job that [The Wiggles] do working with kids fits in so well with what we’re doing here at our school, trying to inspire them, teach them, encourage them that they can go places,” he said. “The music seems to reach all ends of Australia. Music is universal.”

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Blue Wiggle Anthony Field dances with Nathan Schrieber. They’ll enjoy it, but also learn something.”The Wiggles like you’ve never heard beforeThe Wiggles recorded a version of their lullaby Rock-a-bye Your Bear in the Gunggandji language, accompanied by children, local elder Uncle Daniel Murgha, Indigenous singer/songwriter Elverina Johnson, and Yarrabah State School culture teacher Nathan Schrieber.”The funny thing is, our language, we didn’t mean it to match perfectly, but it almost fits rhythmically exactly the same, the syllables of the words,” Mr Schrieber said.”It’s amazing how these two separate languages and separate cultures have come together so well. Wigglemania has swept through the far north Queensland Aboriginal community of Yarrabah.But Blue Wiggle Anthony Field said it was the children’s music supergroup that left richer for the experience.”We learnt so much today about the Gunggandji People,” Field said.”We’ll remember this more than any entertainment centre gig. [It] defines people, it’s what they have in common, it’s unique, it’s beautiful sounding,” he said. Even this morning we had the preps to twos and they were all singing along [to] Hot Potato and Fruit Salad and Rock-a-bye Your Bear,” she said. Photo:
There was a lot of excitement among the children in Yarrabah about their visitors. (ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)
Field said it was a privilege to share the Gunggandji language with the world.”Language is what it’s all about. (ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)
“The television show that we do is on in 190 countries around the world, and I hope every one of those 190 countries that are watching learn as much as we did today about this beautiful culture up here — their music, their dance and the people,” Field said.”We wanted to include our Australian culture, and I think today was an amazing educational experience for everyone who watches that show. Photo:
Yellow Wiggle Emma Watkins was surprised the community was so familiar with The Wiggles’ music. (ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)
“It’s amazing that the music has transcended all the way out here.
ABC Far North

By

Brendan Mounter

Updated

November 10, 2016 15:55:07

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The Wiggles perform with traditional Aboriginal dancers in Yarrabah. (ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)
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Reptile handler proposes as massive croc Elvis watches on

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An Australian reptile handler has proposed to his girlfriend inside a crocodile enclosure at a reptile park in New South Wales.Handler Billy Collett made the proposal during a demonstration while 4.5-metre crocodile Elvis watched on from just metres away.In a video uploaded to the Australian Reptile Park Facebook page, Mr Collett can be seen inviting his partner Siobhan Oxley to enter the enclosure to “have a crack at feeding the crocodile”, before dropping to his knee to make the proposal in front of a crowd of spectators.Before inviting Ms Oxley in, Mr Collett coaxed the large crocodile out of its pond with what appears to be a piece of meat on the end of a stick.”Three years ago, next week, I actually met the girl of my dreams; the girl I love more than anything,” Mr Collett announced to the crowd.”The last three years have been, yeah, the best of my life.”Mr Collett tells the crocodile to “stay there” and “behave yourself” before he turns to his partner to propose.”Siobhan, I want to spend the rest of my life with you, will you marry me?” Mr Collett asks before the crowd bursts into applause.After she accepts, a clearly relieved Mr Collett jokes that proposing was “worse than feeding a crocodile”.The crocodile appeared to be unmoved by the gesture.
Brazilian rugby player gets surprise on-field wedding proposal from girlfriend
Updated

November 05, 2016 10:38:15

Video: Reptile handler proposes marriage inside crocodile enclosure

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Bold rural experiment gives hope to dying towns

Australian Story

By Greg Hassall

Updated

November 07, 2016 07:53:57

Video: The social experiment to repopulate Mingoola has been labelled a win-win scenario

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And there’s not much joy in a place with no children.”
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Mingoola, with a population of about 150, straddles the border of Queensland and New South Wales. (ABC News: Kristine Taylor)
State member for Lismore Thomas George said both communities were behind the project.”What I have observed every time I speak to Emmanuel is the respect that he has for Julia and vice versa.”You’ve got a good team and a great community behind them, and that has enabled this program to be a success — both communities have accepted each other with open arms.”For some locals, however, the speed of change has been unnerving and there are concerns about the capacity of the area to take so many new arrivals.”This isn’t a prosperous area,” Mingoola Progress Association chairman Bob South said.”All our kids have had to go away and work; they haven’t found work here.”And I think the biggest fear we had was we would be introducing the [African] people into a poverty trap.”It isn’t racism to actually be concerned for the welfare of these people.”We don’t want to bring people into a lower standard than we would accept for ourselves.”Ms Harpham acknowledged there had to be a limit to the community’s generosity.”I keep saying, ‘please stop telling people about Mingoola,'” she said.”The brutal truth is we have four houses and we couldn’t sustain more than four families anyway in our small community — it’s just not really possible.”

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Mingoola farmers say the new residents bring a permanent seasonal workforce to help pick crops. They had been displaced from Rwanda and neighbouring countries during years of bitter civil war.The majority had rural backgrounds before having to flee their homes for refugee camps.”If you ask them, ‘What was your dream when you applied to come to Australia and boarded the plane,’ they say, ‘We hoped we were going to be put in the countryside, to connect ourselves with agricultural life and have a garden’,” Mr Musoni said.Instead they were resettled in cities where employment prospects were few, the environment was intimidating and many became depressed and isolated. (ABC News: Kristine Taylor)
Since then a third family has come to the area from Adelaide, bringing the number of new arrivals to 29.Local farmers have been employing the adults to do ongoing seasonal farming work that was previously done by backpackers, an increasingly unreliable source of labour.Isaac Icimpaye and his wife, Renata Ntihabose, were among the first to move and they have been very happy with their new home.”What I like about Mingoola is that my children will grow with the same culture as we used to have back home,” Mr Icimpaye said.”In the city I used to just sit doing nothing but in Mingoola I grow vegetable and beans.”‘Poverty trap’ concerns

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Julia Harpham says Mingoola only has enough homes for one more refugee family, despite a waiting list of more than 100. Her town was dying before her eyes.”Many of us have children who work in the city and aren’t going to come back to the farm because things have been so tough on the land,” Ms Harpham said.”You don’t like to see a community die. Photo:
Emmanuel Musoni with a few of the newest children of Mingoola. (ABC News)
Refugees yearn for spaceMeanwhile in Sydney, refugee advocate Emmanuel Musoni was grappling with problems in his community from central Africa. (ABC News: Kristine Taylor)
Generous community welcomes newest residentsAmong the families who have settled there has been a great sense of gratitude.”The people of Mingoola are good people, friendly people, lovely people,” refugee Jonathon Kanani said.”I don’t know how to say about the things that they do for us; I can’t describe that.”Ms Harpham said she was being realistic about the situation.”We know that nothing is ever perfect,” she told Australian Story.”But I’ve been stunned by the generosity of our community. So we feel so thankful to their efforts and their help.” External Link:

The Mingoola experiment shortform
Moving to MingoolaMr Musoni led a small delegation from his community to Mingoola early this year to meet locals and see whether resettlement was viable.On his return he put out a call for families willing to make the move; within a week he had a waiting list of 50.He chose two families from Wollongong with 16 children between them. Key points:Three African refugee families have moved to rural border communityNew residents have brought regular seasonal workforce for Mingoola farmersMore than 205 African refugee families on waiting list
In the tiny township of Mingoola, on the border of New South Wales and Queensland, local woman Julia Harpham was grappling with a common problem in rural communities.The population was in decline, enrolments at the local primary school were down and farmers could not find labourers to help with manual work. Because they weren’t happy in the city.”

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Jonathon Kanani, his wife Fainess Kabura, Isaac Icimpaye and his wife Renata Ntihabose were the first two African refugee families to move to Mingoola. Photo:
The arrival of six primary school-aged children allowed Mingoola’s school to reopen. Six of the children were of primary school age, which would allow Mingoola Primary School to remain open.Meanwhile, the community began renovating several abandoned houses in the area to accommodate the families, who moved to Mingoola in April. Three years ago the local progress association decided to take a leaf from the region’s migrant past and looked for refugees willing to move to the area.But when they began contacting refugee agencies they were told there would not be adequate support for refugees in the bush.”Every time I contacted any kind of refugee service they all said, ‘oh, no, these people need to stay in the city,'” Ms Harpham told Australian Story.At the end of last year matters became more urgent, with the announcement Mingoola Primary School would close if there were no enrolments in the new year.”It was just like the death knell of our community,” Ms Harpham said. A radical grassroots resettlement plan has transformed an ageing rural community, bringing together two groups with very different problems. Our priority is, are they happy? Video: Mingoola locals say a lack of regular work and an ageing population meant the community was facing a bleak future. (ABC News: Kristine Taylor)
Rural towns look to Mingoola modelFor those involved in this social experiment, the hope is that its success can be replicated elsewhere to help other struggling rural communities.Mr Musoni now has 205 families on his database wanting to move out of the cities and politicians have been watching the Mingoola project with interest.”I’ve had no hesitation in telling the Mingoola story, trying to encourage other people to look at the same program,” Mr George said.Mr Musoni said the support so far had been encouraging.”Julia and her community have shown it’s possible that regional communities can be welcoming to people from Africa,” he said.”They have broken the ice that was existing for us to get into the regional areas. (ABC News: Kristine Taylor)
A meeting of mindsMr Musoni made this point at a meeting last year with senator Concetta Fierravanti-Wells, then assistant minister for multicultural affairs — a meeting that made a lasting impression on one of the senator’s advisers, Isobel Brown.”I’m a migrant myself,” British-born Ms Brown said.”A good settlement journey is your future and a key part of the settlement journey is being secure and safe, gaining employment and getting on with life.”If we’re going to bring people to Australia, we deserve to give them a future.”Around this time Ms Harpham had contacted local federal member Barnaby Joyce about her desire to settle refugees in the area.Mr Joyce’s office knew of Ms Brown’s interest in resettlement and asked her if she could help the residents of Mingoola.Ms Brown put Mr Musoni and Ms Harpham in contact late last year and from there things moved quickly.

Gypsy-rock filmmaker Emir Kusturica and Dope Lemon to play Womadelaide

The Specials headline 2017 Womadelaide line-up

(ABC News: Malcolm Sutton) Photo:
WOMADelaide crowd soaks up the family-friendly atmosphere.
(Supplied: Womadelaide) Updated

November 08, 2016 08:01:41

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Emir Kusturica & the No Smoking Orchestra are one of the headline acts at Womadelaide.

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A monk smiles as he rests under a shady tree in Botanic Park during WOMADelaide.

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Ibeyi smiles at the crowd.

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Engaging and colourful, Angelique Kidjo on stage at the 2016 WOMADelaide world of music, arts and dance festival.
Frantic gypsy-rock group Emir Kusturica & the No Smoking Orchestra and Angus Stone’s laid back psychedelic side project, Dope Lemon, are among a further 27 acts announced for Womadelaide 2017.The world music, art and dance festival will be in its 25th year next March, having launched in Adelaide in 1992 and becoming an annual event in 2003.Emir Kusturico is a controversial filmmaker who has won the Palme d’Or at Cannes Film Festival twice.His 11-piece Serbian-based band was described by Womadelaide organisers in today’s announcement as “genre-defying and irreverent, whose frantic ‘unza unza’ versions of rumba, rock and gypsy music are incredibly entertaining and slightly mad”. Photo:
Angus Stone will be performing with his sometime psychedelic outfit, Dope Lemon. (Supplied: Womadelaide) External Link:

Emir Kusturica & The No Smoking Orchestra
The No Smoking Orchestra are on the bill along with Austrian electro-swing group Parov Stelar in its exclusive Australian debut.Festival director Ian Scobie said it had taken “some years” to get both acts to Adelaide.”Every time we’ve tried they’ve either been about to go into the recording studio or they’ve been at the wrong end of the world,” Mr Scobie said.”Things have just finally come together.”Mr Scobie said the Serbian group was in high demand around the world.”[It’s] a completely crazed Serbian gypsy experience.”They’re really an extraordinary band and Emir himself is a really high-energy performer and that sort of mixture of rumba and rock n roll and gypsy music is just the most amazing mix.”Archie Roach returnsSinger-songwriter Angus Stone will be among a group of Australian acts that include L-Fresh The Lion, DD Dumbo, and Nattali Pa’apa’a — the Blue King Brown singer in her Jamaican reggae project, Nattali Rize.Grammy Award-winning African artist Oumou Sangare is also appearing, along with New Orleans street band The Hot 8 Brass Band and Sahrawi singer-activist Aziza Brahim.The latest festival details follow the announcement in October that English band The Specials would be playing, along with Indigenous singer-songwriter Archie Roach, who was part of Womadelaide’s first line-up 25 years ago.Also taking the stage in 2017 will be the Philip Glass Ensemble, founded in 1968 by the man described as the master of minimalist composition.The work Koyaanisqatsi Live (Life Out Of Balance) will be performed to mark Glass’s 80th birthday.Next year’s festival at Botanic Park will be held from March 10-13.

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Sarah Blasko performs at WOMADelaide. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)
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Sacrilege, a full-scale inflatable Stonehenge replica, is an instant hit with the children at WOMADelaide and inspires some spectacular antics. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)
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The Violent Femmes played their popular hits for the crowd at WOMADelaide.

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Sarah Blasko hits the right notes at WOMADelaide. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)

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At twilight, the opening evening’s big WOMADelaide crowd soaked up the music. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)
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Ibeyi performs on the WOMADelaide stage.
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A woman plays her drums in the park lands setting of WOMADelaide.
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Balmy weather provided a perfect introduction to the four-day WOMADelaide festival. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)
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A big crowd watches the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra’s performance with Angelique Kidjo on opening night.

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A Tibetan monk at work in peaceful Botanic Park. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)

World music festival delights Adelaide audiences

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A crowd gathers to watch a performance at Womadelaide (ABC: Malcolm Sutton)
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Violent Femmes’ frontman Gordon Gano leads a tight and energetic set at WOMADelaide. (ABC News: Malcolm Sutton)

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Members of Ladysmith Black Mambazo perform at WOMADelaide.
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The iconic flags of WOMADelaide flutter in the autumn breeze.

Back pain to window panes: How lead light helped heal a construction worker

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In his former trade as a dogman, Glenn Howlett at the State Bank building site in the 1980s. Glenn Howlett once soared above Adelaide’s tallest buildings, working as a dogman on various construction sites during the 1980s.He was quite literally on top of the world.Then things came crashing down when he tore a disc in his back.”I tried to rehabilitate [while still] in the construction industry by doing different things,” Mr Howlett told 891 ABC Adelaide’s Mornings program. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson) Photo:
A class of students learn how to assemble lead light panes with Glenn Howlett. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
The beauty and diversity of glass soon had Mr Howlett all but consumed.”I don’t think there is a medium as interactive as glass,” he said.”It can be a lead light or heated, fused and blown.”The dying trade of glass artisanMr Howlett’s son Kane now helps when the kilns are fired and glass is being blown, but the trade is not one he sees his son going into.”Lead light has definitely had a decline over the past 10 years, but everything has cycles of going in and out of vogue,” he said.Cheaper, mass-produced imported styles of glass and the lack of appreciation for handmade items would eventually see the demise of local producers, Mr Howlett said.”It’s really hard to make a living out of doing anything creative.”A lot of art really isn’t appreciated by a lot of people — most people just look at the price tag and go, ‘God, that much?’,” he said. Photo:
Over the years Glenn Howlett has taught himself how to work glass in a variety of ways. (Supplied)
He trained to operate one of the towering cranes but found the work only further inflamed his injury.”Looking down all the time didn’t do my back any good and climbing up and down the tower of the crane was hopeless,” he said.Seeing his window of opportunity closing in the construction industry, Mr Howlett turned to a window of a different kind — a stained glass lead light one.Career changeWanting to create lead lights for his own home, Mr Howlett had enrolled in a TAFE course to learn the craft just weeks before he was injured.”It was the first year that WorkCover came in, [and] the whole theme was to try and retrain people — that’s how it all started,” he said.During his 18-month rehabilitation, Mr Howlett turned his hand to creating lead lights full-time.His interest in glass grew and he soon learnt the arts of blowing and slumping.
Wondai Art Gallery on board for rail trail economic boost
(891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson) 891 ABC Adelaide

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Brett Williamson

Posted

November 08, 2016 13:21:42

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Glass artisan Glenn Howlett works on the layout of a lead light window at Willunga Glass Studio.
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National art glass prize winner named

10yo NASA-bound after creating bandage dispenser while undergoing chemotherapy

(ABC News) By Seraphine Charpentier-Andre

Updated

November 09, 2016 08:32:06

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Bridgette Veneris came up with the prototype while undergoing chemotherapy.
A 10-year-old girl who invented an easy-to-use adhesive bandage dispenser while recovering from leukaemia is about to make a dream trip to NASA after being named Australia’s best young inventor.Bridgette Veneris, from Melbourne, won the littleBIGidea competition for her idea to make a quicker and easier way to unpeel sticky plasters.She received the good news at St Joseph’s School in Chelsea, in front of her family and classmates.”It makes me feel amazing, I never thought I could win the prize,” she said.Bridgette came up with the idea after she was diagnosed with leukaemia last year.She could see her parents and nurses struggle with unwrapping the bandages and decided she would create a system that was more ecological and practical.After a few experiments she developed a concept plan and prototype, where the bandages rolled out like sticky tape.”I thought, if no-one is going to do something about it, then this problem is just going to go on forever,” Bridgette said.”The casing can close completely to make sure no dirt gets in to the casing and it keeps the Band-Aids completely sterile.”Young inventor her dad’s ‘hero’

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The dispenser would still keep the bandages clean from dirt. (Supplied: www.littlebigidea.com.au)
While most 10-year-olds dream of going to Disneyland, Bridgette said she had always dreamed of visiting NASA.Her competition victory is making that dream come true.”Just going in the space shuttle, that would be amazing,” Bridgette said.James O’Loghlin, host of the ABC’s New Inventors and Dr Rob Bell, host of Network Ten’s science show SCOPE, selected Bridgette’s idea as the winner.Bridgette said winning the award was a great thrill after 18 months of chemotherapy and her father Steve had tears in his eyes when reflecting on her tough journey.”She’s been so resilient, she had long beautiful brown hair, she lost all those curls, she lost her ability to walk,” he said.”She’s has been the most positive person, she is my hero.”
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Trump cake creator thrilled after global exposure

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Portraits happen to be very time-consuming and detailed and we price accordingly,” she said.While some on social media believe the Trump cake has a sad expression, Ms Alt said that was not meant to be the case.”It was not intentional at all,” she said.”I think he has a naturally very serious-looking face. The creator of a Donald Trump cake, which is at the presidential candidate’s election party and has gone viral on social media, says she is shocked at the attention her work has received.The Trump bust has spurned memes and plenty of comments online after it was photographed being wheeled into the New York Hilton Midtown. External Link:

Tweet: @melissaaltcakes: We loved making the #trumpcake
The cakes took about 50 hours to make, after Ms Alt viewed photographs of the candidates from different angles and calculated the dimensions of their facial features.”Cakes can range anywhere from $1,500 and upwards. (Supplied: Melissa Alt)

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Melissa Alt said the cakes were made of chocolate and fondant. Photo:
Melissa Alt and her team spent about 50 hours creating Trump and Clinton cakes. It’s been so fun and so exciting,” New Jersey-based cake maker Melissa Alt told ABC News.”Someone ordered a Hillary Clinton cake for a private event so I decided to make Donald Trump one as well. I was going for a serious look.”People are photographing it looking downwards, and that made looks sadder.”The version she created of Mrs Clinton appears slightly happier, with the Democrat posing with a wry smile.Ms Alt said she was staying “neutral” on who her preferred president was, but hoped Mr Trump himself would get to see her work on election night.”Hopefully he’ll cut the cake,” she said. The faces are made of chocolate, while fondant icing was used on the bodies. (Supplied)
“I was not expecting it at all. I thought it was a good opportunity.”Ms Alt said she knew someone involved in the Trump campaign through her manager, which enabled her to get the cake into the results party.She said the hand-sculpted pieces were worth about $US7,500.
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US election: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton cakes go viral on social media
By Kristian Silva

Updated

November 09, 2016 16:36:31

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The Donald Trump cake has been wheeled into the Republican’s election party.

Why we’re more likely to date someone who has an ex

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Dating apps not the 'death of romance', researchers say
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Women are more likely to be attracted to a man who has been “chosen” before. (Pexels.com)
or is it?Although you may not have heard of “mate copying”, you may have heard of “the wedding ring effect”. It’s known a man is much more desirable if his female partner (current or former) is highly attractive (than if she is less attractive).But we also know that while a moderate amount of relationship experience makes a man more desirable than if he has none, too much makes him really undesirable.A study I co-authored looked at how romantically desirable a man was perceived to be, as a function of how many partners he’d had in the past four years. By doing so, they are indirectly offering relevant information about the person.But why might this be useful? Maybe they have trouble committing, or maybe they are more interested in quantity. (Reuters)
Women, however, are generally attracted to less observable characteristics (social dominance, kindness). We call this phenomenon “mate copying”.Mate copying can be thought of as purchasing a product (a romantic partner) after seeing others (former partners) “use” it.By virtue of having been in a relationship, an individual is communicating they have “desirable” romantic characteristics (these have appealed to at least one person previously) and you can be confident there is something about them that is appealing.Do men and women ‘mate copy’?In a sense the previous partners of a person are “endorsing” them, or attesting to their romantic competence. Photo:
Researchers found far more evidence of mate copying in women than men. (Pexels.com)
It’s not all about quantityOne of the interesting things about mate copying is that, like with many things, quality is more important than quantity. There is plenty of literature supporting the idea men are largely attracted by physical qualities (physical beauty, youthfulness). A big reason for this is married individuals are so much harder to attract and/or date than single individuals. While enquiry into the existence of the phenomenon among humans began far more recently, preliminary evidence suggests it definitely exists and is an extremely powerful attraction force.Ryan Anderson is a PhD candidate and David Mitchell is the deputy head and lecturer in the Discipline of Psychology, both at James Cook University.Originally published in The Conversation. Photo:
A couple of previous partners was found to be far more desirable than none, but five or more is far less desirable. Men with one or two previous partners were far more desirable than men with none, but men with five were far less desirable than any of these.This non-linear relationship might seem curious — if a bit of relationship experience is desirable, wouldn’t a lot of experience be really desirable? Whatever the case, they are indicating undesirable relationship qualities.Mate copying among nonhumans has received a lot of attention in the past several decades, with numerous authors finding evidence for it in aquatic, avian and terrestrial animals. The information gains men achieve by knowing what other men think about a woman are marginal.Being in a relationship is attractive … Well, no, and the reason probably has something to do with promiscuity.While having had five or more previous partners is certainly far from unheard of, it may indicate the person can’t or won’t maintain a relationship for long. This broadly describes the popular(ish) belief that wearing a wedding ring makes a man desirable, because he has obviously won the romantic favour of at least one opposite-sex person (his wife), and he is willing to commit.Given indicating a willingness to commit makes a man very attractive, and considering he is conveying a lot of positive characteristics (he’s likely a good partner, he’s willing to commit), the persistence of this belief is not surprising.However, evidence doesn’t support the idea married men are more desirable than single men. Some of our efforts are conscious and some are unconscious.Research has found people with relationship experience, all else being equal, tend to be more romantically desirable than people without relationship experience.In other words, people are attracted to others who have already been “pre-selected” (or pre-approved). Where men can get a fair bit of mate-relevant information from simple observation of a potential partner, women can’t, and are encouraged to look for additional information.One cheap source is knowing what other women think of a man, specifically, whether or not he is considered a good romantic prospect.While some researchers have found evidence of mate copying in men, there is a fair bit of literature suggesting the phenomenon is quite a bit stronger among women.One reason for this is men don’t get as much out of mate copying as women do. Also, there are some strong moral proscriptions against pursuing a married person. Most people would agree choosing “the right” partner is fairly important, and a bad selection in this area can be devastating.Most people want to attract a partner, and this involves a combination of self-promotion, and taking down the competition in order to appear to be “the right” partner. Well, if you are going to make an important decision (who to partner with) you generally want a fair bit of relevant information.Knowing someone else has been chosen before is additional relevant information that will help you make your decision.But there is a sex-difference here, and it essentially comes down to biology.
The Conversation

By Ryan Anderson and David Mitchell, James Cook University

Posted

November 10, 2016 07:02:34

Colouring away your stress isn’t child’s play

Bushcare 'good for health' as well as the environment
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Amanda Hoh

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November 10, 2016 14:04:47

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Colouring is a relaxing activity that has been found to reduce anxiety. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
It is one of the basic coordination skills instilled in toddlers and children, and an activity that a group of Sydney women are returning to as a way to “de-stress”.Each month Jane Broadbere, a librarian at Mosman Library, hosts adult colouring classes for local residents.”We started it looking for something to do for Adult Learners’ Week last year,” she said.”Colouring books were at the top seller’s list so we thought, why not try a colouring group for adults?”Sometimes there’s complete silence as we concentrate on our colouring, but there’s also a lot of talk too.”

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Jane Broadbere says the adult colouring classes have become a social experience. gives me peace of mind for the rest of the day.” — Cynthia RansfordOne Mosman resident, who did not want her name published, said she started colouring after her husband died. I colour before I go to bed, I sleep better.” — Lindy Green”I enjoy colouring because it relaxes me and it just frees my mind … Colouring in. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
The classes have been both a cathartic and social experience for many of the women who attend.”It’s comforting, there’s no decision making, it’s easy. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
“Adult colouring was one of the things suggested as a stress breaker,” she said.”It’s mindless, enjoyable, and at the end you can just sit back and think ‘that’s rather nice’.”Studies confirm colouring reduces anxietyA 2015 study from the University of New England found that art-making activities, like colouring, significantly decreased anxiety in college-aged students prior to their exams.Another study published in the Journal of the American Art Therapy Association in 2012 found that “colouring a mandala reduces anxiety to a significantly greater degree than colouring on a plaid design or colouring on a blank paper”.Currently there are at least 10 adult colouring books listed on the UK’s Book Depository best sellers list, while consumer comparison site Finder.com.au has Johanna Basford’s Lost Ocean adult colouring book listed as one of the top 10 books for 2016.Basford’s first colouring book, Secret Garden, has sold 11 million copies worldwide.The Mosman class has recently been colouring Bollywood-themed pictures like floral mandalas and decorative animal figures.”It’s therapeutic for people,” Ms Broadbere said.”We can colour in and it can look terrible, but it’s only a piece of paper and you can just throw it away.” Photo:
Many women have found colouring a calming and relaxing activity.

Australian family donates heirloom to Battle of Fromelles museum

(891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
“She [the museum director] said: ‘Are you very sure you want to give this to us? This is so personal, so special’,” Ms Petho said.”They could really not believe that the letter existed and that we had come all of this way and were prepared to hand it over.”The value of the items were seen to be of such great importance to the area, a ceremony involving the mayors of Fromelles and Fleurbaix to mark their handover was held at Pheasant Wood Cemetery.”We will never forget it,” Ms Petho said.”People near us had tears in their eyes.”

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Private Victor Rudolph Offe, a machine gunner. Photo:
A letter home from Victor Offe on July 29, 1916 describes his experiences in the Battle of Fromelles. An Australian family heirloom has been recognised as a rare piece of trench art and gifted to a French war museum.The copper plate sign was brought back from the Battle of Fleurbaix by Private Victor Offe.On the 100th anniversary of the battle, Offe’s grandchildren Paul Fullston and Victoria Petho returned to France with the sign.Unsure if it was a local town sign or an Australian-made souvenir, the pair presented it to the Museum of the Battle of Fromelles seeking more information.Museum director Claire Fillassiez gasped as they presented her with the sign, Ms Petho recalled.”She saw it and went: ‘Oh! (Supplied)
Ms Petho said she was glad they had travelled to France to give the sign back.”We think that [Vic] would think it was a really great idea,” she said.”We have no regrets or second thoughts at all.”The family are planning to also donate Offe’s Australia shoulder badge, his rising sun badge and other personal items to the museum’s collection.”It’s a way of thanking the French people and reminds them we are grateful for them for what they did for us,” Ms Petho said. Trench art!'”It was thrilling not just knowing the outcome but to think it had some value to the museum itself.”The grandchildren also gave the museum one of Offe’s personal diaries and a letter describing the battle.
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French town sign souvenired by WWI digger to be returned
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Brett Williamson

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November 11, 2016 10:39:02

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Victoria Petho (left) and Paul Fullston (right) handover the sign to the mayors of Fleurbaix and Fromelles. (Supplied: Nick Catt)
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NoongarPedia created as first Wikipedia site in Aboriginal language

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Jacob and Benjamin are students at Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School in Bunbury, WA. (ABC South West: Meghan Woods)
They got put off doing it.”

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Rocks painted by children from the Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School in Bunbury. Listen to Awaye! Hear more about the NoongarPedia project. We found that that was kind of restrictive, especially with the Noongar language.”Ms Cumming says the bilingual capacity of the page is important.Even though more people are learning and speaking Noongar, it is not always conversational and is often combined with English.Then there are the different dialects: town dialects, family dialects, and different meanings for the same words. (ABC South West: Meghan Woods)
While NoongarPedia is the first Australian Aboriginal language site on Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia comes in 295 different languages across the world.”In the first part of the project we were looking at other examples of Indigenous cultures globally that have tried to do a similar thing,” Ms Cumming said.”A lot of those were actually all in language. eventually.”We are working on that,” Mr Digby said.”We are looking at starting more languages up in Darwin and Brisbane during 2017 and then we’ll work from there.”There are 300-odd Indigenous languages across Australia and yes, the ultimate aim would be to capture all 300 Indigenous languages with a full language encyclopedia for themselves.”The ABC acknowledges that the word “Noongar” is spelt many different ways. (ABC South West: Meghan Woods)
Ms Stanley says she has had to go back to the beginning rather than build on existing knowledge.”You’re sort of learning yourself and you haven’t got a lot of parents at home that have any background knowledge, only from their grandparents,” she said.Soon, NoongarPedia will provide online support for these language teaching efforts.The Noongar community will play a major role in creating and advising the page, but Ms Cumming said the page is for everyone.She said that included “our non-Indigenous brothers and sisters who want to learn more about the Noongar people, Noongar language and Noongar culture”.”I think too with the change in the national curriculum, schools and educators will find this is a fantastic learning resource,” she said.Ultimate aim to capture all Indigenous languagesWikimedia Australia president Gideon Digby agrees that the project should be designed to educate everyone.”The basic principle of Wikipedia is to share the sum of all knowledge,” he said. In Noongar country, in the south-west of Western Australia, researchers are building the first Wikipedia site in an Aboriginal Australian language.The Noongar people spoke their language for thousands of years — until, last century, it started to fade.Now, Aboriginal languages and knowledge are being revived, celebrated and made a part of the Australian curriculum.The NoongarPedia project is still in its “incubator” phase, but already resembles the main English Wikipedia page.Noongar woman Ingrid Cumming, a research associate working on the project, says one difference is that it is bilingual.”We’re trying to work with Wikimedia Australia to keep the same kind of interface but also make it culturally appropriate,” she said. Because the Noongarpedia project uses the “Noongar” spelling, we have also used that spelling in this instance. The word Noongar itself is spelt in many different ways.”That’s just the beauty of the South West and Noongar country, the diversity of Noongars,” Ms Cumming said.Online resource to support classroom learningAt Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School in Bunbury, WA, the classroom walls are covered with colourful pictures of people and animals with words like “kaya” and “mooditj”.While the students recite the words with confidence and pride, there are challenges in trying to teach the language to the next generation.”Kids when they went to school weren’t allowed to speak their language, so they’ve lost it,” said Noongar language teacher Kim Stanley.”Our cleaner here at the school was told off when she went to school speaking it. Photo:
Noongar words cover the walls of a classroom in Bunbury. “I’ve grown up in Western Australia and realised that we can’t share the sum of all knowledge until we actually collect and collate all knowledge.”When you’re talking about the south-west of Western Australia, that includes Noongar knowledge and Noongar culture.”As for the other Australian Aboriginal languages, Wikimedia hopes to create pages for them as well …
Indigenous video game to help keep language alive
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By Meghan Woods for Awaye! Updated

November 11, 2016 11:05:45