Camp helps kids with a disability find their voice

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Redland Bay 4165
(612 ABC Brisbane: Terri Begley) 612 ABC Brisbane

By Terri Begley and Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

September 22, 2016 12:21:58

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Finley learns to communicate with his mother using a device.
(612 ABC Brisbane: Terri Begley)
At home she can understand and chat with her son without the technology, but said it would become more important as he grew up.”Coming here it encourages you and reminds you why you’re doing it and the long term,” she said.”That long-term goal is for him to be a fully communicating adult that can speak without assistance from anyone else.”The family has been using communication devices since Finley was two years old.Currently they use a device called the Liberator, which can find any word in the dictionary after just three taps.”The most exciting thing about it is that he can get his own thoughts out,” Ms Coll said.”He says exactly what he wants to say.”
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Through his device, Finley said the camp had allowed him to speak more.”We wrote and performed our own play and I really enjoyed it and I love being on stage,” he said.Finley said having an electronic device gave him a voice.”It means people can know me and what I think.” Photo:
Camper Finley speaks with his mum using an electronic device. (Supplied: Camp Have a Chat)
“Most of the communication is done using symbols and a little bit of signing too.”She said technology had helped break down communication problems.”Tablets make communication cheaper and more accessible for kids,” Ms Nivala said.”It also makes it more trendy for the kids to have a tablet with them and normalises it.”It’s only going to get more exciting and offer more opportunities to the kids that come along to the camp.” Amanda Coll said the camp allowed her son Finley the chance to learn how to talk more with others. A special camp in Queensland is teaching children with disabilities, who can’t speak, how to use technology to talk to family and friends.Choice Passion Life (formerly the Cerebral Palsy League) runs Camp Have a Chat, which helps school-aged children with complex communication issues to discover their own voice.The group of 18 has been undertaking the four-day camp in Redland Bay, north of Brisbane, this week.The only initiative of its kind in Queensland, campers were given a range of communication devices to help them talk with others.”We have children using communication books, assisted technology and iPads with communication software,” camp coordinator Karen Nivala said

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Children are taught how to talk through devices at the Camp Have a Chat camp.

Growth spurt for Darwin athletics club for youths with disabilities

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Darwin 0800
How to discuss disabilities and the Paralympics with children
I thought we could [help him out].”Membership fees were waived to incorporate the tiny club into DAC, opening them up to professional facilities and uniform sponsorship, yet the group still struggled to grow beyond eight members.Membership doublesThis year consultation with disability stakeholder groups uncovered a participation barrier: transport.With a good chunk of Darwin’s children with disabilities living in care or coming from disadvantaged families, Ms Tune realised many were missing out.After a local charity offered up a shuttle bus, several parents volunteered as drivers and since then participation rates have doubled.”You’re not relying on the parents [or carers] who are maybe tired, exhausted, have other children, competing interests,” Ms Tune said.”It’s a regular dependable thing that they’ve been able to just come along.”Coach hopeful for Darwin’s next ParalympianAfter he stopped going to practice a few years ago due to transport issues, 15-year-old Scott Stevenson was this year welcomed back into the fold with help from the shuttle service.”My favourite thing is long jump and discus. Photo:
Participants range from very young up to high school students, with the club now set to open up to include all ages. He fronted up again this week.”Sixteen-year-old Dawyte Clancy has been with the group for several years and has won several gold medals in discus.”From when I started, I just fell in love with it,” he said.”This is one of the main sports that I do. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
Today a Paralympics classifier, Mr Mitchener is certain Romone has what it takes for the Tokyo Paralympics in 2020.Yet he said that whether his Monday night athletes won Paralympics gold or just aimed to take out Lion King, what continued to motivate him was seeing everybody participate.”Sport is all inclusive. Direct fatal hit to the head but he’s still the same. Photo:
Assistant coach Lara, Romone, Paul Mitchener and Dawyte on the track. Photo:
Siblings of core members also participate. I’ve just got a fire in the belly about it,” she said.Grant funding would also help support Paralympics hopefuls, including former rugby player Romone Lewis who suffered a brain injury in a quad bike crash last year.Now living with limited speech and a blanket ban on contact sports, this month Romone came within 12 per cent of the world record time for his disability in the 200-metre sprint.”[I like] running fast,” he said. It shouldn’t have people sitting on the sidelines because they’re sitting in a chair or have a leg missing.”Sport is for everybody.” “I learned how to be a soccer coach and Dwayte learned how to be a goalie.”The last-minute soccer team made it to the finals undefeated — and then claimed the national trophy. It’s what keeps me going throughout the week.”Community chips in to boost groupDespite operating without government funding, in 2012 the after-school group headed to Newcastle for its first Special Olympics, expecting to compete in athletics and swimming.”When we arrived we discovered that soccer was also on the program, so we quickly entered a mixed team of swimmers and athletes,” Mr Mitchener said. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
Now determined to access government grants, Ms Tune said the group hopes to further expand its capabilities, with it recently opening up to all ages and disabilities.Ms Tune said while the group’s members were welcome to participate in all DAC classes, expanding the disability-focused group allowed everybody to shine with support and come together as a community.”I’ve quit my role as president to focus on this group. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
In 2014 the group caught the attention of the Darwin Athletics Club (DAC) after its president Kylie Tune “kept being told about this coach Mitch”.”He was coming on his little scooter with a little backpack full of bicycle tubes that he’d use for resistance training. They pick the kids up. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
Today Mr Mitchener, known to everybody as Mitch, runs a Monday night group that includes very young children right up to high school students, most with intellectual disabilities.Activities include long jump, running, mini hurdles and Mr Mitchener’s unique version of target practice.”We use soft toys [to] give the kids something to aim at rather than the empty grass,” he said.”We killed Lion King last week with the javelin. Animal welfare officer Paul Mitchener describes his after-hours passion as something that he “just fell into” 15 years ago while coaching his own children’s athletics team.Darwin’s only dedicated athletics group for young people with disabilities started with one child he noticed sitting on the sidelines.”They were just sitting there watching everybody else and not participating,” he said.”It looked like they wanted to.”

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The soft toys are Paul Mitchener’s unique brand of target practice. It’s fabulous what they do,” she said.Ms Campbell hopes to send a younger child to athletics too, although achieving this would probably require a dedicated support worker during Monday night practice. I like coming here because I’ve got lots of friends,” he said.His guardian Rose Campbell looks after several other children with disabilities and described the athletics group’s new shuttle service as a godsend.”I just couldn’t get him there.

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105.7 ABC Darwin

By

Emilia Terzon

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September 22, 2016 16:08:09

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Paul Mitchener (left) has been running an athletics clubs for youths with disabilities for 15 years. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)

Could this be Australia’s most eclectic fashionista?

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Margaret Burin

Updated

September 23, 2016 09:36:49
I said the numbers keep turning. (ABC News)
Her passion for fashion began about 23 years ago when she was on a business trip with her husband Howard. “He said, ‘why don’t you buy a little hat?’,” she says.”It was like a dam wall had burst. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Melbourne woman Dee Goldberg in her outfit made out of soft toys. Dee lives in Australia’s self-proclaimed style capital, but she has a very different view of fashion to many Melburnians. There are no limits. And many of them tell a story; delving into themes like Aboriginal rights and her shame of apartheid in her birth country. “It’s my hobby,” she says. “I like to have a sense of humour and take the piss out of things.”

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Dee Goldberg uses Instagram as her style journal. (Instagram: Deeegoldie)
Dee keeps a style journal on Instagram, where her following went from just a few to a few thousand overnight after fashion photographer and Advanced Style founder Ari Seth Cohen shared a photo of her Barbie shoe headband.”I told my daughter, there’s something wrong with my Instagram. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Dee Goldberg has made this piece out of chocolate wrappers. “I’ve found a voice in myself as I’ve gotten older,” she says. That’s an understatement. She said ‘you’ve gone viral mum’. “There is no such things as clashing colours,” she says.Her hundreds of outfit combinations are made out of recycled materials. “It was like a fire had been lit inside me. (Instagram: Deeegoldie)
So is Dee Goldberg the southern hemisphere’s most eclectic fashionista? Each one of them is likely to showcase every colour of the rainbow — and if you look closely, you’ll find everything from Lego blocks to lolly wrappers. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )
Dee isn’t interested in high-end labels. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )
While they may be mismatched, Dee’s outfits aren’t just thrown together. “My mind starts to swirl and it starts to move upside down, and what I try to tell people is I don’t look at things the same way,” she says.”So I can see pieces of paper, or a block and then I see it as a bag. And then I’ll see pipe cleaners at Lincraft and I’m already making it into a hat or an Alice band.”

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Melbourne woman Dee Goldberg is the resident fashionista at Chapel Street Bazaar. “This is not dress-ups, this is wearable art which takes a lot of time, energy, collecting, it’s expensive — each piece costs a lot of money by the time I’ve finished.” One of her latest outfits explores an imaginary story of Barbie going to Mars with NASA.”This is my fantasy of Barbie, Barbie being not the blonde bimbo but actually having a brain.”

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Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. “Nothing is out of bounds. You will die in the bum.”

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Dee Goldberg’s favourite outfit is her Chanel ball gown, made out of rip-off garments. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. “Well, I haven’t met anyone that is more eclectic than me,” she says.”But if there is, I’d love to meet them.” “Sorry Melbourne, I do not do black,” she says. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Dee Goldberg’s favourite outfit is her Chanel ball gown, made out of rip-off garments. Photo:
Melbourne woman Dee Goldberg has an eclectic passion for fashion. “I’d rather die than go into a designer store,” she says.”I take the piss out of Chanel.”Wait until you see the Chanel outfit. It was like every nerve in my body was alive. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )
The 61-year-old, who was born into a conservative family in South Africa, only found her individual style when she was in her 40s after working in finance for 14 years.When it comes to clothes, her motto is “more is more”. But that’s not something she’s interested in. [poster]Dee Goldberg’s flamboyant garments may not have been paraded on the runway yet, but her unique passion for fashion has long been turning heads. She often spends years collecting bits and pieces, before taking them to her sewer to be added on. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

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Dee Goldberg uses Instagram as her style journal. I thought, viral, I might need to go to the doctor.”She’s been invited to New York to be photographed and has fielded dozens of offers from fashion bloggers. I felt alive for the first time and I still feel the same way.”Since then, she’s been rampaging op shops, markets and the Chapel Street Bazaar where she works, and with the help of her sewing partner she turns unwanted goods into wearable art. However, a Chanel ball gown, made up of many different counterfeit garments, is her favourite of all the outfits she’s designed. You just wear it and you rock it.”

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Nurses create Instagram account to stop poo being taboo

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Travelling poo
“It normalises poo — it’s really important to talk about it and we wanted to start that conversation.”‘We talk about poo all the time’Co-creator Jemma Ambrose said the photos had showed people that poo did not have to be a taboo subject.”People see the photos and it gets them talking and discussing poo and bowel health more,” she said.”For us, we’re bowel nurses, so we talk about poo all the time.”It’s the first question we ask our patients each morning.”Ms Ambrose said the nurses wanted people to notice the signs of bowel cancer early.”Many people with the symptoms of bowel cancer just think it’s an upset stomach and they don’t do anything about it,” she said.”If bowel cancer is found early on, about 90 per cent of the cases can be treated successfully.”At the moment only 40 per cent of cases are found early enough to treat, and what we want to do is raise awareness for that early detection.”
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Surgeons test Bristol
Curious carry-on When travelling, the nurses always ensure that Bristol is in their carry-on luggage.”Generally he’s on the plane, not in check-in, as then people see him and ask questions about it,” Ms Ambrose said.”I took him all the way to Brazil with me and he was my pillow for the 25-hour flight.”Colonoscopy all-clearThe doctors and surgeons at the inner-city hospital have been encouraging of the nurses’ project.”They are very supportive,” Ms Ambrose said. External Link:

Sisterhood of Travelling Poo in Brazil
Named Bristol, after the international stool scale, the emoji poo toy has been photographed in Brazil, Mexico, Bail and Scotland and on numerous beaches around Australia.”He’s a very well-travelled poo, he gets around,” nurse and creator Steph Young said.”Our manager came up with the idea and encouraged us to take the poo away because as nurses we travel a lot.”So we take him with us and take photos of him travelling.”It can be interesting holding a toy poo through Customs.”The team chose Instagram as a platform to spread the message not only nationally, but internationally.”We’re getting messages and likes from people all over the world,” Ms Young said.”Many young people think it’s an old person’s disease, but it’s not and Instagram connects with younger people. “They even gave Bristol a colonoscopy recently and he had the all-clear.”The group hopes to take Bristol to Paris soon and photograph him near the Eiffel Tower. A group of nurses in Brisbane have started an Instagram account posting photos of a toy poo in iconic places around the world.Ward 6E colorectal clinical nurses from the Wesley Hospital started the account earlier this year to raise awareness about bowel cancer.
Quiz: How much do you know about poo?
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What your poo can tell you – Bristol Stool Scale

(612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe) 612 ABC Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Updated

September 23, 2016 11:10:05

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Steph Young and Jemma Ambrose hold Bristol, the travelling poo.

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Wild weather floods animal rescue organisation with orphans

All creatures great and small: Wildlife rescuers Trevor and Trina
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The recent spate of wild weather has seen a torrent of orphaned animals in need of care at Adelaide Hills animal rescue organisations.In the 24 years that operator Bev Langley has run Minton Farm Animal Rescue, she said it was the busiest she had ever seen it.”It has impacted on the wildlife pretty badly,” Ms Langley said of the weather.891 ABC Adelaide went along to meet some of the orphans in need. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
This koala joey was found next to a busy road in Hawthorndene.”She was found sodding wet, in a puddle and freezing cold,” Ms Langley said.Fallen trees, strong winds and heavy rains were proving problematic for the local koala populations, she said.But the wet weather may have a positive impact in the long run.”Since we have had the rain we have started to get these beautiful fresh shoots on the gums and that will be a bonus if they can get through.”

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An injured tawny frogmouth being cared for at Minton Farm. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
With the advent of spring, blue-tongue lizards have begun to shed their skin and move around.Ms Langley has a pair of the lizards in her care — one that had been accidentally spiked with a pitchfork and the other unable to see due to eye infections.Both are now on a round of antibiotics and Ms Langley hopes they will recover well. Photo:
A heron chick found in a sheep paddock. Photo:
Two injured blue-tongue lizards. Photo:
A baby lorikeet rescued by students from the Scott Creek Primary School. Photo:
A koala joey found by the side of a busy road. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
A magpie has also been dropped off to the farm after it was found trapped in a caged walkway overpass at the Blackwood railway station.”She’s got stuck in there somehow and just flailed and flailed and flailed,” Ms Langley said.The bird had stripped all of its flight feathers in the panic.”She’s just a bloodied mess on both sides.”Ms Langley said the bird would never recover to a level where it could be released into the wild.”The girl who rescued it is keen to take her on as a pet in an aviary,” she said. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
Ms Langley said a female baby heron was dropped off after being rescued from being trampled by a flock of moving sheep.”It was in a paddock among about 300 sheep,” she said.”This lovely young man saw this tiny grey ball of fluff and [picked it up].”The three-week-old chick has begun feeding and is responding well to care. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
This badly injured tawny frogmouth was found on the side of the road in the Onkaparinga Hills.”It may have been trying to catch a moth in a car headlight and the wind blew him off track,” Ms Langley said.The bird was admitted with injuries to his wing and leg.Ms Langley said he had been responding well to treatment. Photo:
A 10-week-old baby possum orphaned at Morphett Vale. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
Walkers in Morphett Vale found a baby brushtail possum and brought it to Minton for care.”She’s been either blown off mum or mum has lost her footing in the wet branches and slipped,” Ms Langley said.The 10-week-old female was being regularly syringe fed and kept in a humidifier. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
Children at Scott Creek Primary School found a rainbow lorikeet chick and dropped the orphaned animal to the farm this week.”He has really feathered up and the wings are very small,” Ms Langley said.”He is in a crèche with other rainbow lorikeets.”

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A female magpie injured after being trapped in a railway overpass.
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(891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson) 891 ABC Adelaide

By

Brett Williamson

Updated

September 23, 2016 16:07:11

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Minton Farm Animal Rescue’s Bev Langley with a recent storm arrival.
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Dancers with dementia take to the stage

This 62yo ballerina is following her dream to dance
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Now I can do what I want.”The performance will be part of the Rockhampton Dance Festival. They’re just enjoying it.”Dance helps improve cognitive abilitiesTeam leader Debbie Biles first instigated tap dancing classes, and now she and her team of carers practice with the residents in between the weekly lessons.She said the improvement in cognitive abilities had been very clear, along with the ability to take direction from staff. Facility manager Robyn Tetteroo said the initial idea behind weekly dance classes offered to residents was to help with cognitive abilities, balance and concentration.She said the suggestion to enter the dance festival had been a little daunting at first, until she thought, “Why not?””Why should people hide away because they have a diagnosis of dementia?” she said.”Let’s show people what they can still do. (ABC Capricornia: Inga Stunzner)
It has been a long time since Mary O’Sullivan last donned her Irish dancing shoes back in the home country.Now 76 years old, she is one of the six residents and five carers bound to bring the house down in Rockhampton’s Pilbeam Theatre on Friday night.For those who are privileged to watch, it is likely to be an event they will not forget.But the real joy lies in the eyes of Ms O’Sullivan and her fellow dancers.”I’m happier than I ever was,” Ms O’Sullivan said after Monday’s stage rehearsal.”At first I thought ‘You’re crazy Mary’, but no, I’m not. A team of dancers from an aged care facility are preparing to perform at central Queensland’s largest dance festival.Four of the dancers live in Mercy Aged Care’s Leinster Place facility’s high care dementia unit, and by Monday they may not even remember being on stage.But this night is not about what they can no longer remember, it is about living in the moment and enjoying the life they still have. They’re enjoying themselves and having fun in the moment.”Dementia isn’t easy and there’s a lot of sadness, but you can see people are still able to do things and not be daunted by getting up in public and dancing. (ABC Capricornia: Inga Stunzner)
“If you can give them a little bit of independence, it’s amazing what can follow,” Ms Biles said.”We’re really fortunate to have Robyn as our site manager.”If you have a good leader, then you’re going to have happy staff, and that filters down to the residents and their families.”Dance teacher Karlie Bellew is the magic behind one of dementia therapy’s most daring experiments.She has been teaching tap dancing in the dementia unit for more than two years, and it was her idea to enter the troupe into the dance festival.”I realised it was about letting people know that once you have a diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimers, it’s not the end,” she said.”You can still participate in the community and in everyday activities.”Challenges of performing on stagePerforming on stage requires a degree of memory even with the assistance of carers, and Ms Bellew said repetition was the key.”We do it over and over and over again until they get familiar with it, and of course the carers are there to aid them on stage,” she said.”The time they give of themselves is amazing.”They have a ball. I’m free. Photo:
Team leader Debbie Biles (L) and a support worker lead residents through a dance routine. Honestly, they have a really good time and I’ve noticed lately that other residents have been coming and sitting in on the classes.”They’re only watching at the moment, but hopefully we’ll be able to get them more involved next time.”

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Mary O’Sullivan is one of the aged care residents taking part in the Rockhampton Dance Festival on Friday night.
'The joy of doing dance': Qld seniors at the barre
ABC Capricornia

By Christine McKee

Posted

September 23, 2016 12:54:51

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Four dancers are from the high care dementia unit. (ABC Capricornia: Inga Stunzner)

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100yo dancer choreographs and stars in production

Stranger pays for tradie’s fuel and tells him to ‘pass it on’

1233 ABC Newcastle

By Rosemarie Milsom and Carly Cook

Posted

September 26, 2016 12:34:03
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John Kennedy Jr (R) said he had not expected to receive any attention. (Facebook: Tyson Crawley)

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They were both like ‘What is this guy doing?’,” he said.”I guess I would have been in the same situation.”In most cases you want to say no, I’ve got this, but sometimes it is OK to accept help.”Mr Kennedy admitted he had thought twice about paying the bill.”I thought he had two dairy chocolate milks on there and I was getting ready to take care of those, but once I saw he had fuel on it I figured I’ll just go about my way, because you never know how much fuel can be,” he said.”So I actually did step outside of the petrol station, but I pretty much felt a tug on my heart and I just went back in and said ‘Hey I’ve been in that situation before, it’s kind of tough every now and then, and I think we all need a hand every now and then’.”Mr Kennedy said he had been through the “darkest moment” in his life recently, which had made him look beyond himself.”The love that people showed me, it was a real reality check,” he said.”We are on Earth for such a short amount of time.”With all the hatred, the racism, the terrorism, so many bad things, we’re all humans, we’re all brothers and sisters in the grand scheme of things. I just think we should show more love.”I’m sure there’s plenty of people that do amazing things, more incredible than this day-in and day-out, and they don’t get any recognition.” (Facebook: Tyson Crawley)
“I think he was blown back, as well as the cashier. The kind gesture of one man to help another by paying for his fuel at a petrol station on the New South Wales–Victorian border has gone viral on social media.Albury tradie Tyson Crawley filled up his car with nearly $110 worth of petrol at the weekend, but when he got to the counter to pay, he realised he could not remember the PIN for his new card.A stranger stepped in and paid for the fuel, and rather than write down his details so Mr Crawley could repay him, he wrote, “Pass it on”.The stranger then smiled for a photo and went on his way.Mr Crawley posted the photo on social media, and the news about the kind gesture has been shared by thousands of people.In the post, he said he had been stunned by the gesture.”I couldn’t believe it, it totalled $110 — not a sum we kind of just throw away,” he wrote.”He continually convinced me it was okay. Photo:
John Kennedy told Tyson Crawley to “pass it on” when he paid for the tradie’s $100 petrol bill. After I ran out of options, I ever so gratefully accepted.” The good Samaritan, John Kennedy Jr, an ice hockey player for the Newcastle North Stars, was travelling for work at the time and said he had not been expecting to receive any attention.”I just kind of walked into a petrol station to get a coffee and that happened, and I walked out and thought that was it,” he said.’It’s OK to accept help’Mr Kennedy said his gesture had been a shock to Mr Crawley.

Radio Lollipop releases top 25 songs that helped sick kids

– Frozen castSorry – Justin BeiberWatch Me – Silento Twinkle Twinkle Little Star – various artistsRoar – Katy Perry
Radio Lollipop vice chairperson Dominic Przeor said Let It Go continued to be a standout favourite despite being released in 2013.”This year we’ve had more than 2,290 song requests from children in Queensland hospitals as well as Monash Hospital where our shows are also broadcast,” he said. Radio Lollipop’s top song requests in 2016:Bad Blood – Taylor SwiftLet It Go – Idina MenzelToot Toot Chugga Chugga Big Red Car – The Wiggles Medley – Peppa PigShake It Off – Taylor SwiftDo You Want To Build a Snowman? The hospital radio station that broadcasts to sick children in Queensland and Victoria has compiled the top 25 songs that have helped patients smile this year.Radio Lollipop provides an in-hospital radio service as well as organised play for children undergoing treatment.The station began in 1990 at the Mater Children’s Hospital in Brisbane and now entertains children at the Lady Cilento, Mater Children’s Private, Logan Hospital and Gold Coast University in Queensland and the Monash Hospital in Melbourne.Taylor Swift’s song Bad Blood was the number one song requested this year. “The children get excited about being on the show as guest DJs and also enjoy hearing their favourite songs being played on our in-hospital radio show.”
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Let it Go from Frozen
The not-for-profit organisation is powered entirely by volunteers.Radio Lollipop chairman and volunteer Michael Gilbert told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Rebecca Levingston the station aimed to bring both music and fun to the children’s lives.”The station engages the children’s imagination and takes them to a different place.”We broadcast live and we’re all highly trained, but everyone from the ground up is a volunteer.”

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Inside the Radio Lollipop studio in Brisbane. “Radio Lollipop are my angels, they are great and they put a smile on my face as well as my youngsters,” she said.”We requested the song Eye Of The Tiger the other night and it just put a huge smile on Callan’s face.”More details on how to support the service can be found on the Radio Lollipop website. External Link:

Taylor Swift – Bad Blood
Other popular artists that made the cut were Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry, Mark Ronson and the cast of Frozen, as well as family favourites The Wiggles and Peppa Pig. (Supplied: Radio Lollipop)
Mr Gilbert said with sick children being poked and prodded all day, the station allowed them to feel like kids again.”Deep down we know if we make one child smile that night you’ve made a difference to someone’s life,” he said.Shana, whose son Callan experienced a traumatic brain injury three years ago, said the radio station helped not only the children but the parents as well.Callan had to return to hospital recently due to further illness.
(Facebook: Radio Lollipop) 612 ABC Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

September 26, 2016 13:09:28

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Radio Lollipop DJ Super Sam broadcasting from the studios in Brisbane.
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‘He gave me hope’: Officer offers to drive man 160km to be with family

He gave me hope,” he said.Mr Ross told local media he had not intended his story to be a “ground-breaking revelation” but hoped it could help calm some unrest. A US officer offered to drive a man 160 kilometres instead of sending him to jail, after learning the man was travelling home following his sister’s death.Mark Ross said he was told over the phone at 3:00am that his 15-year-old sister had been killed in a car accident.Mr Ross, who was in Indiana at the time, said he “instantly got on the road” to try and get back to Detroit to be with his family.As he did not have a driver’s licence, he said he convinced a friend — who had a suspended licence himself — to make the 4-hour drive.The pair was driving along an Ohio highway when they were pulled over for speeding.Mr Ross, who also had an outstanding petty warrant in Michigan’s Wayne County, said he “knew I was going to jail”.But when Wayne County did not want to send anyone to collect him due to the distance, and his friend’s car was also impounded, Mr Ross was stuck.”I explained to the officer that my sister had died and that I needed to get to my mother ASAP,” he wrote on Facebook.”I broke down crying and he saw the sincerity in my cry.”He said the officer, Ohio state highway patrol sergeant David Robison, then offered to drive him about 160 kilometres to get him as close to Detroit as possible.”Everybody knows how much I dislike cops but I am truly grateful for this guy.
(Facebook: Mark E Ross)

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Mark Ross said Sergeant David Robison’s response to the situation was “overwhelming”.
Posted

September 28, 2016 11:45:59

Police bike unit tackles crime, takes selfies on the beat

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“Compared to a vehicle, we can get to places that cars can’t get to and we get there a lot quicker,” Sgt Connell said.”We are regularly first on the scene of incidents — and it also keeps you fit.”We will be dealing with a stealing complaint one minute, public order complaint the next. “We are the first port of call and we are only too happy to go to any matter that people want us to go to.”Safer streetsIn their fluorescent yellow jackets and specially adapted road bikes, the officers have also found themselves a public target — in a good way — with people regularly coming up to chat and request selfies with the officers. Sgt Connell is part of the 36-member team that has patrolled the Perth CBD and Northbridge area on wheels since April. Despite the cold, long hours outdoors, Sergeant Ian Connell of Perth’s police bike-mounted unit says he never dreads coming to work.”It may sound a bit of a rubbish comment, but it genuinely is a joy coming to work every day,” he told Di Darmody on 720 ABC Perth. “I hate to think how many Facebook pages we are on,” Sgt Connell said.He said people have said their high-vis presence had been reassuring.”We go into shops and people say, ‘it looks a lot safer, it feels a lot safer’, and that’s just because we’ve got a lot of people whizzing about in high-vis clothing on high-vis bikes and we just seem to be everywhere all the time.”Anti-fall training The bike unit is staffed by police officers who have done an intensive one-day course which includes anti-fall training. “[It’s] one of the best jobs I have ever done in the police,” he said.”They will have to get me out of my seat on the bike with a crowbar.” “It makes it a lot heavier, but it just saves us going back to the police station,” Sgt Connell said.”We like being out there, seeing the public and dealing with stuff outside. “Everyone thinks they can ride a bike until they sit on a police bike and then they realise they can’t and they can fall off,” Sgt Connell said. “What we try and do with Twitter is give a human side to policing,” Sgt Connell said.”We just like letting people know what we are doing — and if we can stick some humour in there, all the better.”This current iteration is the third time a police bike unit has been formed in Perth and this time Sgt Connell hoped it would stay. “You won’t catch a criminal in a police station.”Social outreachThe bike unit also enjoys promoting its activities on its social media accounts. High-vis presence
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Perth Police bike team on patrol in the city
The team was formed to provide a high-visibility police presence on the streets in an effort to curb crime and anti-social behaviour. External Link:

Perth Police bike team on patrol in Burswood
The bicycles are lightweight road bikes made heavier by the additions of a comprehensive lighting system and panniers that hold all the equipment officers need out on the beat.
(Twitter: Perth Police) 720 ABC Perth

Posted

September 28, 2016 13:12:55

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Perth’s police bike team patrols the city centre’s pathways and malls seven days a week.

Helping dogs become better urban citizens

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Labrador helps university students de-stress
The Conversation

By Simon Carter, University of Melbourne

Posted

September 28, 2016 13:14:15

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Queensland police allowed Buddy to be a police dog on World Dog Day. (Facebook: Buddy’s Bucket List)
The urban dog has an emerging political identity and, given its place as humanity’s “best friend”, deserves positive consideration in city planning.No doubt, however, dogs sometimes cause trouble. This stands to benefit everyone.Animal management holds the keyMost of the more than 4 million dogs in Australia live in the cities and towns where most of the people live. The key to success in enforcement of animal management laws is consistency of process between cases and across councils.The enforcement of effective control, however, is a mess. Such plans are of varying detail and importantly are just that: plans. Better to borrow a puppy or buy one? What happens in practice may be very different.My recently published research demonstrates that some activities are more effective than others in managing various common nuisances. Local councils aim to balance these two forces through animal management. “Nuisance dogs” are everywhere — even if the dogs aren’t aware of it themselves.There is an important contrast here: we choose to bring dogs into our urban world, then control them on a tight leash. Melbourne, where I undertook my research, is home to around half-a-million dogs. This involves:complainant first raises problem with ownerif problem continues, complainant gathers evidence and reports to councilcouncil requires owner to fix the problemcouncil and courts enforce the law as a last resort.That outcomes for each case differ does not appear to be too important to their overall success. But through a better reach and targeted message they will likely be more effective than similar government programs.As dogs are increasingly recognised as having a genuine stake in our cities, we need to look for ways to encourage harmony between the species. This tackles the trouble of dogs head-on with a message underscoring the net benefits of pet ownership for the community.These campaigns may do so out of self-interest — Pet Friendly campaign sponsor Mars Petcare Australia has some obvious skin in the game, for instance. In part, this is because of its focus on a particular demographic that is coincidentally pretty cheap for the government to reach. In public, dogs and their owners can misbehave: dogs roam where they’re not supposed to and owners leave dog mess for others to clean up.Even within our homes dogs can be perceived as a nuisance: barking, digging, slobbering and annoying neighbours. My research supports this, finding that rather than being a tool of compliance, effective control is simply a part of everyday responsible dog ownership. Not every dog lover can have their own furry friend, but there’s an alternative to stalking parks to pat a pooch. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)
Going back to schoolResponsible dog ownership is a learned behaviour.Schools are an excellent place to start teaching people about managing dogs.Public education for schoolchildren is successful. This is because:they are expensive to runthey need to appeal to a very wide audiencethey tend to focus on an individual species to the exclusion of othersthey can take an inordinately long time, often bouncing from one government website to another as governments change, which makes material very hard to find.This all adds up to a weak message, which lacks bang for buck.Public education campaigns that are privately sponsored may ultimately prove more successful. The general procedure for resolving complaints is nevertheless quite successful in practice. Schoolkids are a captive and receptive audience and love a visit from the dog-catcher with the friendly mutt.As a bonus, the children then educate their parents on how to better interact with dogs.Researchers from Monash University have nevertheless called for an increased focus on adult education to reduce the rate of hospitalisation from dog bites.Such education campaigns are easier said than done. Video: Taking to the waves for California's annual 'Surf City Surf Dog' event

(ABC News)
Simon Carter is a Research Fellow in Urban Planning at University of Melbourne.Originally published in The Conversation. Alongside roads and rubbish, animal management is a key function of local government.Animal management is a mixed bag of three distinct activities: education, compliance and enforcement. Our cities are more densely packed than ever before, with people and their dogs living in smaller dwellings and vying for increasingly limited public space. Better animal management presents an obvious place to start. Keep Australia Pet Friendly is a great example. These are outlined in each local council’s domestic animal management plan. Photo:
Tiger Kiekebosh-Fitt says everyone loves labrador Charlie’s visits to university. Unfortunately, this doesn’t always work well, which can harm public perceptions of dogs in the community.We need a critical understanding of animal management to help us help dogs become better urban citizens. There is no agreed definition of what this means — among dog owners, officers, councils and the courts. Understanding the effectiveness of animal management is really important: if we manage the nuisance of dogs well, then they are less trouble to the community and closer to being good canine citizens.Carrots and sticksNuisance barking is one of the most common complaints about dogs in the city. This makes consistent enforcement nearly impossible.The final report of the Victorian government’s recent inquiry into restricted‑breed dogs fails to define what “effective control” actually means, despite its central importance to the issue.RSPCA Victoria argues effective control is an owner’s responsibility.
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Canine Tinder hooking up busy dog owners with time-free dog lovers
Wearable pet gadgets allowing owners to watch, 'gamify' animals

Bulldog who missed ’54 flag for wedding given grand final ticket by stranger

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Western Bulldogs' road to the grand final: 1954 to now
774 ABC Melbourne

By Stephanie Chalkley-Rhoden

Updated

September 29, 2016 14:15:04

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Alan Trusler (left) on the steps of the church after his brother’s wedding. (Supplied)
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Melbourne 3000
“My brother early in the year decided to get married and I was best man at his wedding, and unfortunately I wasn’t able to play in the grand final,” the 83-year-old told 774 ABC Melbourne’s Raf Epstein.”I put myself up as unavailable because of my brother’s wedding.”A keen follower of the current-day Western Bulldogs, Mr Trusler tried without success to get a ticket to Saturday’s game, the club’s first appearance in a VFL/AFL grand final since 1961.He even contacted the club but it was unable to help. [But] nobody told me not to.”Honestly, I regret it.”We were actually in the church [when the game was on], and we were listening to those little radios every now and then.”As we were walking out of the church everybody was saying, ‘how’s Footscray going, how’s Footscray going?'”Prelim win ‘the greatest thing I’ve ever seen’

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Alan Trusler later managed to get his hand on the 1954 premiership cup. (Supplied)
“I just thought, what a gorgeous story and wouldn’t it be great if someone got him a ticket and then I thought, why don’t I just get him a ticket, so that’s what I did.”Mr Trusler said he was “over the moon” that he would make it to the MCG.”As long as I see the game I don’t care what I get, as long as I can get in the ground and get a seat,” he said.”I don’t know how I can thank Christabel for what she’s done for me.”He said there were about six or seven players still alive from the 1954 premiership side.”Normally as a past player I get seats at [Docklands] and we always sit together then, but I don’t know where they will be [for the grand final].”‘How’s Footscray going?’When asked if it was a big decision to miss the 1954 decider, he replied: “Ooh yes, it was a big call. (Supplied)
Mr Trusler was not able to make it to any games this season due to a run of ill heath but he kept a keen eye on the team nonetheless.He said speed, handballs and the ability to kick to position set the current crop of Bulldogs apart from the rest of the competition.”I was over the moon [when they beat the Giants]. A former Footscray player who missed the club’s only premiership in 1954 because he was best man at his brother’s wedding will be at the MCG on Saturday thanks to the generosity of a stranger.Alan Trusler played for the Bulldogs all season in that famous year six decades ago, but made the decision to put family before football on that last weekend in September. Greatest thing I’ve ever seen. they’ll give a great account of themselves.” I just thought I would do someone a favour. They’ve played fantastic football in the last three weeks.”If they play at the same level as they have … Luckily, one listener came to the rescue.Christabel, a Port Adelaide fan and AFL member, bought him a ticket.”I’ve never really bought into the whole fairytale thing with princesses but I am a fan of footy. Photo:
Alan Trusler is confident the modern Bulldogs can with this Saturday.

Meet the photographer behind viral River Murray footage

An amateur photographer who captured footage of a swollen River Murray at Lock 5 near Renmark has been overwhelmed by the response to his image.
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The Advertiser facebook post
(ABC Riverland: Catherine Heuzenroeder) ABC Riverland

By

Catherine Heuzenroeder

Updated

September 29, 2016 13:32:11

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Grant Schwartzkopff has been looking at the Riverland from behind a lens for the past five years.
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Renmark 5341
Once I leave school during the week I’m wondering what I’m going to do that night, weekends are full of sport, that starts six o’clock Friday night and doesn’t finish to midnight Sunday night.”Some people say it’s an obsession — I say it’s a passion.”I don’t want to make it a profession, I think if I went down that path maybe I would lose the passion that I’ve got.”

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A magnificent eagle in flight, backlit against a pale blue sky. It’s just the two of us,” he said.”Photography is a bit of a lonely life I guess, but I enjoy it, I could sit for hours and wait for a bird to lift his wing up.”As soon as school is out on a Friday afternoon, he makes his way to any one of the Riverland’s sporting venues to start a busy weekend of sport photography.During winter he was a regular feature on the sidelines of football, hockey and soccer.By Sunday night he is back home sorting through the new images, cataloguing them with the other 400,000 photographs on his computer and uploading them to his webpage. When he lost his wife it became something of a lifeline.”My wife died five years ago, just as I was starting out photography.”I’ve got a son who is 25 and he comes out with me. (Supplied: Grant Schwartzkopff)
Preserving images of region for posterityMr Schwartzkopff has documented Riverland sport, wildlife and landscapes.”I’m sort of running out of places in the Riverland, I think I’ve just about taken a photo of every dead tree down at Lake Bonney,” he said with a laugh.He prefers the spontaneity of sports photography and the patience required to capture the perfect sunrise or sunset.Wedding photography has been definitively ruled out.”I don’t do portraits and people very well,” he said The Riverland-born photographer worked at Renmark’s Fallands milk factory for 30 years until its closure then took up a position as a school services officer. (Supplied: Grant Schwartzkopff)
“It’s to try to get that perfect shot, which I will never get because the next one might be better,” said the self-described perfectionist.What makes his photography more remarkable is it is not commercial.Mr Schwartzkopff does not get paid by sports clubs or even outlets that publish or broadcast his images.”There’s no money involved at all, it’s all for the love of taking the photo,” he said.”It fills my every waking hour. To me it’s something that I like doing,” Mr Schwartzkopff said.”I was star of the day in one of the classrooms, I’ve had the [Murray Pioneer] newspaper article blown up, the kids were mobbing me in the corridors.”After taking the image at Lock 5 he travelled across the South Australian border and captured this image of the junction where the Darling River meets the River Murray at Wentworth in New South Wales. (Facebook: Grant Schwartzkopff)
Weekends recording Riverland sportPhotography started as a hobby five years ago for Mr Schwartzkopff. Photo:
Photographer Grant Schwartzkopff suspects he has taken a photo of ‘every dead tree’ at Lake Bonney at Barmera while capturing spectacular images. Riverland school support officer Grant Schwartzkopff took the video footage with a drone this month and it has been viewed 42,000 times since being shared by South Australian newspaper The Advertiser on social media.The impressive aerial shot conveys the high unregulated flows along the River Murray as a result of rain in the upper catchment.The Lock 5 weir pool level is 45cm above full supply level (FSL) with flows into South Australia currently about 36,000 megalitres per day and predicted to increase.”It’s astounded me that people appreciate such a bit of video footage. (Supplied: Grant Schwartzkopff)
His love of photography and willingness to make his images freely available has built up a stockpile of photographs that play a role in preserving the Riverland for posterity.He provided 100 images for a football art exhibition currently on display at the River Lands Art Gallery.Photography has also been his ticket to follow his passion for sport, which has taken him as far as SANFL games and into the clubrooms of his beloved Norwood team.And while it can be a solitary pursuit, it has kept him connected with his community.”Five years ago I would have stayed at home and done nothing and no-one would have known me,” he said. Photo:
Every weekend photographer Grant Schwartzkopff makes the rounds to Riverland sport, capturing moments and sharing them on his webpage. Photo:
tKeen photographer Grant Schwartzkopff took this image at Wentworth in late September 2016 showing where the Darling River (on left) and the River Murray (on the right) meet.

First wild eastern quolls born in Canberra in 80 years

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Quolls come home after island breeding program
Quolls killed by foxes after climbing predator-proof fence

(Supplied: Adam McGrath) 666 ABC Canberra

Posted

September 30, 2016 10:19:32

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Eastern quolls are successfully breeding at Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary.
Western quolls released into Flinders Ranges
(Supplied: Will Batson)
Mr Cummings said they expected to see more joeys soon. “When they are rice-sized they come out into the pouch and then it’s survival of the fittest for those six teats. “Ultimately we hope six come from each mother that we’ve got in the sanctuary; we’ve got five in there and we think each of them [has joeys]. “It’s really the battle of the fittest from the time they are born,” Mr Cummings said. “It’s a harsh world out there and we’re just glad they’re kicking on in the sanctuary.”

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Eastern quolls can birth up to 20 young but only the first to attach to their mother’s teats will survive. “The research team will be doing some tracking in coming weeks and we hope to get a good handle on how many there are in the sanctuary.”Quolls reach sexual maturity within 12 months so it is expected next winter there will be a much larger breeding population. External Link:

Quoll mother with joeys at Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary
Female quolls can birth up to 20 young yet they only have six teats.The first babies to attach themselves to the teats will be the only ones to survive. Wild eastern quolls have been born in Canberra for the first time in more than 80 years.Fourteen quolls from Mt Rothwell and Tasmania were released into Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary in March as part of a conservation project.The cat-sized, spotted marsupial had been considered extinct on the mainland for more than 50 years.Jason Cummings from the Woodland and Wetlands Trust said the arrival of the quoll joeys meant the first phase of the experimental reintroduction had proved successful.”It’s fantastic news for the species across the country,” he told ABC Canberra’s Drive program.A team of researchers from the Australian National University captured on camera a mother quoll emerging from a den with five joeys hanging onto her.
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Reserve expansion makes for a very happy Save the Koala Day

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New flora reserves to save remaining south-east NSW koalas
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Cooma 2630
(NSW Office of Environment and Heritage) ABC South East NSW

By

Bill Brown

Posted

September 30, 2016 16:06:11

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Kybeyan reserve is at the southern end of a region with a significant koala population.
Logging conflict brewing again in NSW south east forests
The next challenge is that the money be spent on the right management programs, if history is not to repeat,” he said. Video: Chris Allen briefing volunteers on one of the koala surveys that identified the very small number of remaining koalas in the coastal forests of south-east NSW

(ABC News)
Mr Rutherford cited SETA documents that asserted a decline in the koala population in the state forests that were transferred into the South East Forests National Park in 1998.The SETA document concludes: “After more than 20 years of protection of this koala population from logging, the people of NSW might reasonably expect to hear that there has been a significant increase in the koala population as a result of this headline environment policy initiative of the Carr government.”SETA claims that the koala population of the South East Forests National Park has decreased from around 40 to 45 mature adults to zero, under NPWS management.However, conservationists involved in the campaigns of the 1990s and subsequent NPWS koala population surveys claim that only four adult koalas were tracked prior to 1998.They also say there was evidence of perhaps only a few more within the entire region that would later become the South East Forests National Park.A survey of the South East Forests National Park in 2000/2001, two years after its transfer from State Forests, found no evidence of koalas.Conservationists, however, point to studies that show that koala populations in areas that have been affected by logging, will continue to decline for up to 20 years after cessation of the impact.They say these reserves are essential if there is to be any hope of rebuilding koala populations. The Kybeyan Nature Reserve west of Cooma will be expanded with the purchase of an additional 1,000 hectares of koala habitat.The purchase will increase the size of the reserve by 20 per cent, with habitat that includes preferred koala tree species, Kybeyan River frontage, and endangered plants found only in the Southern Tablelands.The reserve is towards the southern end of a 100,000-hectare area, with a low density koala population estimated at least several hundred, a significant population nationally.The expansion is intended to secure suitable habitat for resident and breeding koalas and other threatened fauna species such as the spotted-tailed quoll and woodlands birds.NSW Environment Minister Mark Speakman said the property was located within two critical landscape corridor initiatives, the Great Eastern Ranges Initiative and the Kosciuszko to Coast corridor. “On a landscape scale, these additional 1,013 hectares increase habitat linkages across protected areas on privately owned and other public lands,” Mr Speakman said.The expanded Kybeyan Nature Reserve protects two of three known NSW populations of Zieria citriodora, an endangered plant species. Photo:
Protests such as this one blocking the road to the Eden woodchip mill in the early 1990s led to the establishment of the South East Forests National Park (David Gallan)
However, she said there was still much work to be done, especially in ensuring that the reserve had sufficient financial resources for effective landscape management.”My experience is that NPWS (NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service) never get enough money from the government and so it usually falls back onto dedicated individuals,” he said.”You are only as good as how much money you have for management.” Ms Taggart said it was important the community embraced the development and work to “enhance the habitat”.Landscape management questionedPeter Rutherford, from the South East Timber Association (SETA), questioned the effectiveness of nature reserves and their management by NPWS.”Deb (Tabart) is right in saying that our national parks systems must be adequately funded. Deborah Tabart, chief executive of the Australian Koala Foundation, welcomed the announcement as a Save the Koala Day present.”I think it’s a thrill that we’ve got this new land,” she said.”A rare gold star from me for our political leaders who have made this decision.”Ms Taggart credited environmental activists who began campaigning for protected habitat in the early 1990s.
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