Huge crowd lines Adelaide streets for Christmas Pageant

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Some colourful costumes offer more protection than others from showers during the pageant. (Facebook: Credit Union Christmas Pageant)
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SA police horses are always part of the CBD parade.

First street parade had eight floats and three bands1934: Father Christmas became part of the pageant and it ended at the department store’s Magic Cave1945: Adelaide’s pageant made a return after not being held for four years during WWII1960s: TV coverage of the event commenced1985: Retailer David Jones bought SA retailer John Martin’s but the pageant continued1990s: The South Australian Government bought the annual event and later sold the naming rights to a group of credit unions
Saturday’s annual parade started with a glimmer of blue sky after some morning showers and wound its way along a route of more than three kilometres through city streets until Santa took up residence at the Magic Cave in North Terrace until Christmas Eve.The parade is always held in early November to herald the approach of the retail festive season and regularly attracts crowds estimated at more than 300,000, with additional interest in the television coverage of the event.The 2016 pageant had 66 floats, along with dozens of clowns, a variety of bands and other performers, and each year some new floats are created.This year’s crowd got to see Father Christmas Rules, Mr Sandman, the Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny floats for the first time.A blue “honour line” is always painted along the streets to help manage spectators and ensure a clear path for the floats and other entertainers.The thousands of volunteers who bring the pageant magic to life attended rehearsals over recent weeks and were up early on the day of the parade to share some breakfast and get into their costumes and make-up.After the city parade, some of the performers headed to the Adelaide Women’s and Children’s Hospital to ensure children in the wards there got to share some of the excitement of pageant day. Adelaide’s annual Christmas Pageant has widened its scope this year, with even the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy getting some attention alongside Father Christmas. Some Pageant history:1933: Adelaide Christmas Pageant founded by department store owner Sir Edward Hayward. Photo:
Easter Bunny is one of the Pageant newcomers this year. (Instagram: CUPageant)
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A wet roadway but blue sky as the annual parade starts in South Terrace. (Twitter: Events South Australia)
Updated

November 12, 2016 11:56:49

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These performers were a “high note” of this year’s parade. (Facebook: Credit Union Christmas Pageant)
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Bright red soldiers march through the Adelaide CBD.
Adelaide Christmas Pageant an annual spectacle
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A giant cycling clown is ready for pageant action.
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A clown keeps still while her make-up is completed. (Facebook: Credit Union Christmas Pageant)
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Now a tradition of the Adelaide Christmas season, the Nimble float ahead of the first pageant in 1933. (SLSA: BRG121_1_1563)

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Father Christmas waves to the crowd after the Adelaide pageant arrives at North Terrace.
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Not just Santa’s big day, as the elves also get to entertain the Adelaide crowds.

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The Christmas Pageant was smaller but no less exciting for the crowds in the 1950s.

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A cupcakes float moves through the heart of the city.

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Cheers and waves from some of the pageant clowns ahead of the parade.

Volunteers bring Adelaide Christmas pageant to life

(ABC News: Claire Campbell) (ABC News: Claire Campbell)
Sally Hebenstreit, who was a clown this year for the first time, said it had been her dream for nearly six decades to be part of the Adelaide pageant.She said she dragged her husband and two children in for the fun.”I’ve been making these kids practise every night — for an hour after tea — it’s serious business,” she said.”We’ve been to clown school, we’ve had all the teaching, training and we’re there now, we’ve got it.”Whatever the weather, and this year a touch of rain cleared in time for the street parade, it always heralds the arrival of Christmas cheer to Adelaide.When the busy Saturday morning is over and Father Christmas has descended from his float to enter the Magic Cave of retailer David Jones, the thousands of costumes have to be washed, ironed and put back into plastic bags to be stored until next November. I think there’s around 300 ladies that I do [make-up for],” she said.”One person does foundation, one will do cheeks and one will do lips.”After getting into costume, parade volunteers leave the workshop area to take their place on a float, collecting their props on the way to their place in the parade.Clowning around is serious business

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The Hebenstreit family went to clown school to learn pageant skills. Photo:
A Christmas fairy finds her costume in the dressing rooms. Adelaide’s annual Christmas pageant takes the work of thousands of volunteers to bring the joy and colour of the approaching festive season to hundreds of thousands of South Australians.On the day of the big parade through the streets of the CBD, the costumes room officially opens at 6:00am but many performers start arriving well before that.Make-up is a production-line process for the pageant performers and needs more than 120 make-up artists to help out on the day.Kelly Traeger is among them and has been volunteering at the Christmas pageant time for 13 years now.She said it was always exciting to be busy behind the scenes.”The atmosphere, you can’t beat it.
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November 12, 2016 15:06:38

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Kelly Traeger applies make-up to Kristina Obst for the Alice in Wonderland float.
Huge crowd lines Adelaide streets for Christmas Pageant

Walnut the whippet joined by hundreds for final beach walk

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November 13, 2016 12:14:10

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Mark Woods and Walnut (being carried) were joined by hundreds of dog walkers. (Twitter: Heidi Davey)
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Dog walker, Sue, tweets video of the hundreds on the beach
“He has had an incredible life and having reached the grand age of 18 is ready for his final sleep,” Mr Woods wrote.”I would love it if dog lovers/owners and friends would join us for a celebration of Walnut on his favourite Porth Beach.”Hundreds of pooches left paw marks on the sand and supporters used the hashtag #WalkWithWalnut on social media to pay tribute to the animal, who also became a media star in his final days.”If #walkwithwalnut has done something, it’s restore my faith in the compassion of humanity, in a particularly dreary year,” one tweeted.”Meanwhile, at Porth Beach Newquay, humans demonstrate proper love and solidarity on their #walkwithwalnut and Mark,” tweeted another supporter.Mr Woods carried Walnut across the beach as his ill health meant he was no longer able to walk.He told local media Walnut had provided much comfort over the years, seeing him through two marriages and three engagements.After Walnut was euthanased the evening after the walk, Mr Woods posted a thank you to all who attended. (Facebook: Mark Woods)
“Walnut passed away this morning at 11.56am … he went very quickly and in my arms,” Mr Woods wrote on his Facebook page.”Thank you to the hundreds of people that attended the walk this morning and to all those that had their own walks with their beloved pets around the world.”The whippet breed originated in England and have an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years. Photo:
“He went very quickly and in my arms,” Mark Woods said in a Facebook post on the day they euthanased Walnut. Before a trip to doggy heaven, 18-year-old whippet Walnut was joined by hundreds of people and their pups for a walk along an English beach.Walnut’s owner Mark Woods posted details about the dog’s final walk along the beach on Facebook, inviting dog owners to join him on a beach in Newquay, Cornwall to celebrate his pet’s life. External Link:

Visit Cornwall shares video of Mark Woods and Walnut on the beach

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Walnut's last paddle on the beach

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Hollywood courts Queensland writer Krystal Sutherland

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ABC North Qld

By Nathalie Fernbach and Michael Clarke

Updated

November 15, 2016 12:11:22

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Krystal Sutherland: Teenagers identify with the characters in young adult fiction. (ABC North Queensland: Nathalie Fernbach)
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Young adult author Krystal Sutherland at the Townsville launch of her book Our Chemical Hearts (ABC North Queensland: Nathalie Fernbach)
Young adult genre continues to growSutherland said young adult fiction was growing and developing its own sub-genres.She said there was not a single monolithic series such as the Twilight or Hunger Games books dominating at the moment, instead readers were exploring the various sub-categories.”We are going through a bit of a second renaissance here with YA (young adult fiction) there are so many different genres that are popular,” Sutherland said.”I think people are really connecting with these stories of young people who are going through things that have been through or they have experienced themselves,” she said.”It really speaks to everyday teenagers.” It must be every writer’s dream to have Hollywood movie producers knocking on your door to make your novel into a movie.It was a dream come true for Townsville-raised Krystal Sutherland, who published her first novel Our Chemical Hearts in October.The author has already sold the film rights and an Oscar-nominated film producer interested in adapting her book.”I have been told by many, many people that this is very out of the ordinary,” Sutherland said about the speed of her success.”Hollywood especially is something that takes a very long time so … that was a very exciting thing,” she said.Writing a novel in 30 minute burstsSutherland said it was her time at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, writing for the student magazine, that cemented her desire to become a novelist.She said she wrote her novel in between part-time work and full-time study commitments.”I just kind of wrote it on the weekends and whenever I had the time, and it just kind of came together,” Sutherland said.”I would find half an hour here or there — I would wake up a little bit earlier in the morning and really just push myself to get some words done,” she said.

Koala pays visit to accountant’s office, MP sure its ‘taxes are in order’

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November 14, 2016 18:09:47
A koala “on a mission” to visit an accountant in the regional Victorian town of Leongatha, has been stopped in its tracks by a concerned Victorian MP.Victorian Labor MP Harriet Shing said she spotted the koala near a main road on Monday afternoon.”No sign of wounds or injuries and very calm, so the only worry I had was that it would get startled or hit by traffic,” Ms Shing said on Facebook.”S/he seemed to be on a bit of a mission, and wasn’t heading towards any of the nearby trees, so I escorted the fuzzy traveller across the road and down the street.”Eventually the little champion decided to go into Fawcett and Pickersgill Accountants, where the vet was called for an office visit.”Ms Shing joked that the incident was “just another day” in her electorate.”I’m sure his taxes are entirely in order, but it’s important to be thorough,” she tweeted.She said the koala “seemed fine” with its ordeal, but she would leave the relocation to the experts.
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Newcastle cafe serves up hospitality experience for people with a disability

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Robert Virtue

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November 15, 2016 11:27:58

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Luke Ward works in the cafe’s kitchen. (1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)
(1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)
Ms Waters said customers were understanding of the cafe’s goals and the opportunities it was providing.”We are often experimenting with foods, allowing the guys to cook different stuff,” she said.”We could throw out 40 coffees a day, just with them learning.”We’re not here to make money as a business. (1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)
But Ms Waters said keeping the cafe viable did have its challenges.”[We have] just the same challenges that every cafe has in gaining customers, keeping customers, maintaining that reputation,” she said.”Having customers come with a little bit of patience and realise that we are a learning enterprise and our guys might be a little bit slower, the food might take a little bit longer, there might be a spill down the side of the coffee because someone’s got a few balance issues.”Workers keen to develop their skillsLuke Ward’s role at the cafe is mainly in the kitchen as a dish washer.”I love work … it’s really good. “We would like people to come and experience it themselves and realise that the disabilities these guys have isn’t any sort of hindrance. I go home happy because I have work, and I go home and see my mum,” he said.Mark Jones’s role is to interact with the cafe’s patrons.”I work with customers, I work hard. We’re here as a learning enterprise to give the guys opportunities to be able to venture out.”Ms Waters said once customers were in the door, they “soon figured it out”, but the cafe did not advertise that it was a disability service. It’s my job — serving coffees, making coffees … I’m a nice man,” he said. Photo:
Chris Damceski hopes to become a full-time chef. (1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)
Chris Damceski has recently become Chars Cafe’s first apprentice.”Ever since I was six I just wanted to [work in hospitality] because I always baked with my grandma,” he said.”[It taught me] a lot of different things with our nationality, Macedonian.”It’s a good first job if you’re looking at working in the food industry, or [to] help you get your speed up.”I hope to eventually be a full-time chef … I’ll just see how far I go.” They are able to do everyday jobs and be part of the community,” she said. (1233 ABC Newcastle: Robert Virtue)
Expansion into other parts of the HunterMs Waters said the National Disability Insurance Scheme had helped enable growth into other areas of the Hunter, including Mayfield and Lake Macquarie.”It’s enabled us to open [the] Toronto [cafe] and we do also run two school canteens,” she said.”It gave us the opportunity to open up a second canteen within a primary school. A non-profit cafe in Newcastle is expanding its services after high demand from people with a disability wanting to learn hospitality skills.Chars Cafe at Broadmeadow in New South Wales is run by disability service provider Response Services.The operation sees people with a disability volunteer in a variety of roles in the café.”It’s developing some hospitality skills for the guys to go out and get other jobs,” Alisha Waters, Response Services co-ordinator and quality support officer, said.”We do have some service users who are here just for the experience with no employment goals, and they learn customer service skills, food skills, barista skills and feel like they’re part of the community and making a contribution.”There’s some of the guys that have said that they don’t want to learn [how to make] coffee, so we just do what they want to do.”A couple of the guys just like serving the customers, so they will just stay on the till and clean the tables.”But we try to give them a range of experiences — even cleaning the toilets, that’s part of the work and we do have to do jobs that we don’t like sometimes.”

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Response Services has opened cafes at Mayfield and Toronto. Now we’re starting to look towards more catering and more ventures, because more service users have been able to access the facilities.”

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Alisha Waters co-ordinates a cafe providing opportunities for people with a disability. Photo:
Mark Jones’s role is to interact with customers and make coffee.
Disability charity turning one man's trash into jobs
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Baby dolphin freed from Gold Coast swimming area

A dolphin calf has been freed after becoming stuck in an enclosed public swimming area on the Gold Coast. External Link:

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Experts suspect the animal may have jumped over or swum under the netted swimming area at Tallebudgera Creek.Members of the public alerted the Gold Coast City Council and Sea World.Sea World marine mammal trainer Andy Mulville said the dolphin may have been chasing fish after the previous night’s king tide.”At first I don’t even think it realised it was in too much trouble,” Mr Mulville said.”But I think a few calls from a mum and it realised that it’s got itself into a position where it shouldn’t have.”Part of the swimming enclosure net was unhitched from the shore and drawn back to create a 30-metre gap through which the calf could escape and reunite with its mother.”A few calls from her and the calf was finally listening to mum and swam through after about 20 minutes,” Mr Mulville said.The calf snuck out under the water and it was five minutes before the gathered crowd was told it was gone.”A little uneventful for the crowd but they were very happy once they got the report that the calf was back with the mum,” Mr Mulville said.”Everyone was very happy on the beach.”
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By Michelle Rafferty and Damien Larkins

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November 15, 2016 12:49:43

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Boy, 5, helps save mum’s life after allergic reaction

Listen to Hutch take over the triple-0 call after mum Natasha collapses. (ABC News)

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Queensland mum Natasha Bevacqua lay slumped in her home with son Hutch, 5, by her side. Her tongue, quickly swelling from an allergic reaction, rendered her unable to speak with the triple-0 dispatch operator.
“I was trying to say that I couldn’t breathe and they were having lots of trouble trying to understand me,” the Sunshine Coast mum said.”I just remember my eyes closing and fading out … it was on speaker and they were saying ‘Hello, hello is anybody there?'”Hutch, in his little five-year-old voice, answered, “Yes, I’m here.”As the operator calmly asked if mummy was awake, he told her that his mummy had gone to sleep, was not talking and needed a drink of water.”You’ve got to go and look at her and tell me if you can see that she’s breathing … can you grab her hand and squeeze it? “I could go over to the next door neighbours and see if they can come over?” he suggested, adding that he knew the neighbour. You’ve got to be quick,” the operator told him.As he arrived at the neighbour’s house, he banged on the door until it was answered.”My mum’s sick and she won’t open her eyes,” he said.By the time Ms Bevacqua reached the hospital, she had no pulse.”The doctor actually said I was very lucky to be here,” she said.Special award for ‘old soul’

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Hutch Bevacqua is reunited with paramedics Sarah Jackson and Gavin Mahon, who saved his mum’s life. “Take the phone with you and keep talking to me … can you run Hutch? Parents can help by teaching children:The number to call in an emergency is triple-0How to dial triple-0 from a home and mobile phoneTheir address and parents’ phone numbersAbout the importance of triple-0 and reiterate that it’s only for use in an emergencyIf any family members have medical conditions, such as diabetes or epilepsy, tell children so they can let the operator know.SOURCE: Queensland Ambulance Service
Ms Bevacqua, who has since been reunited with the attending paramedics, has not listened to the triple-0 call. He’s just a very special being,” she said. “I’m very proud but very grateful to the ambulance and to Hutch because I owe him my life,” she said through tears.Ms Bevacqua said she had discussed with her son the role of police, ambulance and fire officers in the community and how they were there to help, but they had not discussed what to do in an emergency.”He was quite comfortable talking to them but had had no training at all. Say ‘Mummy’ and see if she opens her eyes,” the operator instructed.Over the next few minutes, with the operator on the other end of the line, Hutch bravely did as he was told, opening the front door for the paramedics who were yet to arrive, holding his mummy’s hand, and even alerting a neighbour about the unfolding emergency. (ABC Sunshine Coast: Bruce Atkinson)
Hutch, who was yesterday presented with a Certificate of Appreciation award for his bravery on the Sunshine Coast, said he felt “good” to be called a hero.”I feel very happy and very brave,” he said. “I think I’d be very emotional listening to him … how brave and how special he is,” she said.She described her son as a calm, placid boy, “an old soul”.
(ABC Sunshine Coast: Bruce Atkinson) ABC Sunshine Coast

By Kylie Bartholomew and Bruce Atkinson

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November 15, 2016 14:21:10

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Natasha Bevacqua is proud of Hutch’s actions during the triple-0 call.

Cows stranded after New Zealand quake ‘saved’

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'Utter devastation' after powerful quake, New Zealand PM says
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The cows were in need of water, and had lost calves during the quake. (AP/Newshub)
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November 15, 2016 17:09:54
Two dead after magnitude-7.8 quake strikes near Christchurch
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and I think one or two had lost calves in the earthquake, so they were a bit distressed.”Kaikoura was completely cut off by massive landslips following the tremor, which struck just after midnight on Sunday, destroying homesteads and cutting road and rail links throughout the northeast of the South Island.”We did lose stock. AP Three cows stranded on a small island of land after New Zealand’s powerful earthquake have been rescued, local media reported.The cows’ plight went viral after video shot from a helicopter showed them huddled on an elevated patch of grass near Kaikoura, about 150 kilometres northeast of Christchurch.The ground around them had apparently shifted or collapsed during the magnitude 7.8 tremor.The farmer, who told Newshub the cows were part of a group of 14 he rescued, worked with a team to dig a path for the cattle to escape after determining the land was safe.”The soil was quite soft because it had all been tipped over and bumbled around, we managed to get a track in and bring them out,” he said.”They desperately needed water… The whole hillside fell during the earthquake and we had a lot of stock on there — we don’t know what we’ve got,” the farmer said.

Outback radio station keeping kids engaged by putting them on-air

(ABC Tropical North: Harriet Tatham) ABC Tropical North

By Harriet Tatham

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November 16, 2016 16:31:01

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Hannah Radke, Riley Chapman and Sarah Peterson perfecting their radio voices.
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(ABC Tropical North: Harriet Tatham)
Lessons out of the classroomMs Branch said aside from watching the students’ confidence grow, the program also highlights the power of teamwork and music. “The second week they learn about our programming software, and how to put that music into the program.””From there they go and do some voicers — so they learn how to record their own voice and put some stings in.””They then put their ads in that they need to — our sponsorship — ads in the fourth week, and then the fifth and sixth weeks they get an hour each to go live in air.”

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Riley Chapman, Hannah Radke and Sarah Peterson are just some of Moranbah’s teenage radio stars. (ABC Tropical North: Harriet Tatham)
Six weeks of trainingMs Branch said students enrolled in Project Y attend the station twice a week for six weeks — a length of time she said was sufficient to train the students about presenting live on air. “Music is so healing and it’s an expression — there’s no right and wrong and that’s one of the things we found particularly in the early days,” Ms Branch said. Despite the idea of radio being all fun and games, Sarah admitted it could be hard work. “There were students who were really struggling at school and perhaps had faced suspension, and they were blown away that they got here and got to do what they wanted to do.””That’s often times why they’re disengaging, because they just don’t fit the school model.”When you can come and just listen to music and put together a be expressive in your own way, that kind of creates a feeling of belonging of having a purpose.”

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Leaning how to load the radio stations’ computer system with music. What was initially a targeted program has opened its doors up to all students from Moranbah State High School. “Those students were referred to the radio station to begin this Project Y program,” she said. “It’s a really good experience, and it’s good if you wanted to be a radio presenter or a journalist, and it gives you that passion for music.”

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Ready to go live on the wireless. and so many students [were] asking about it from the school that we decided to open it up to anyone that wanted to come along — not just those kids.” “We’ve got 12-year-olds coming to do this, so very young,” she said. “I think my least favourite job is pressing the buttons when the song ends, because your kind of talking to someone in the studio, and then you realised, ‘Oh god I’ve got 2 seconds’,” she said.Her 15-year-old colleague Riley Chapman has also been involved with Project Y for two years, and said he would encourage more students to get involved. “When they come in they find where all our music is, and they get to spend the first week looking through most of them,” she said. “I wanted to do something radio and I like listening to music, so why not combine them,” she said. From there things get more advanced. (ABC Tropical North: Harriet Tatham)
Students eager to be trained in radioAt just 14 years of age, Sarah Peterson has volunteered with the radio station for two years, and said signing up was a given. “I definitely have benefitted from this, because it’s given me all this knowledge and stuff about music that I probably haven’t gotten before,” he said. (ABC Tropical North: Harriet Tatham) “They come along, they spend six weeks in the program, and they get to learn what it’s like to put a show together and go live on-air.”

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Moranbah’s community radio station is helping students re-engage with education, while potentially forging the radio stars of the future. “We had more students come through in 2013 …

Fiona Branch on Project Y. (ABC News)

Perhaps the presenter is 50 years old, perhaps they’re even 25 — but have you ever heard of 12-year-olds presenting hour-long live programs?This is the reality for locals in the remote Queensland mining town of Moranbah, where a youth radio program is being used to tackle disengagement within schools.”The program actually started at the end of 2012, it was an initiative to help students that were struggling at school — that were at risk of disengaging,” said organiser and radio presenter Fiona Branch. When we tune into our local radio station, many of us are greeted by middle-aged voices.

Farmers pitch in to harvest crop for farmer fighting cancer

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“In the past, Dad’s organised it for a few of our neighbours, so I think it’s time he took help off some people.”

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Headers harvesting wheat on Peter Waterhouse’s property. (Supplied: Peter Waterhouse)
In the end, more than 1,000 hectares of wheat was harvested.Peter Waterhouse, a father-of-five, said it was a “huge boost” to witness so many people willing to help.”They come from as far north as Bowgada and down to Ballidu, across to Carnamah,” he said.”There were that many phone calls from people offering to help out, we had to sort of knock people back in the end, we had too many trucks.” “It was quite overwhelming.”Blake said his father had spent decades volunteering and contributing to the community, and was initially reluctant to accept the help. “It makes it a bit easier for me to relax and concentrate on my treatment,” he said. “It’s great for the community to get together as well.” (Supplied: Peter Waterhouse)
“He’s pretty much done everything for everyone else but as soon as people want to help him, he’s not really inclined to take it,” he said. Since then, trips to Perth for treatment had held up his harvesting operation. One of his sons, Blake Waterhouse, organised the harvest event.He wanted his parents to have “one less thing to worry about”.”It’s just the last sort of thing they need to be worrying about at the moment, is taking off the crop,” he said. “It’s taken a bit for him to realise that it’s happening and so many people want to help him out.”Mr Waterhouse eventually warmed to the idea and said it was a huge relief to look across the paddock and see his crop has been harvested. Roughly 200 friends, family and colleagues of Mr Waterhouse gathered after the event.”People and all family come from Esperance and Perth; it was magnificent to see everyone come along and we all had a great night,” he said. Photo:
Volunteers pitched in to help local farmer Peter Waterhouse harvest his crop. People from across regional Western Australia have pitched in to help a farmer bring in his crop after he was diagnosed with cancer.Dozens of people turned out with machinery and road trains to finish harvest at Peter Waterhouse’s property in East Maya, about 300 kilometres north of Perth.The 62 year old, who has a reputation for contributing to his local community, was diagnosed with liver cancer following a routine annual check-up earlier this year.
ABC Mid West and Wheatbelt

By Sarah Taillier

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November 16, 2016 17:22:53

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Volunteers loading wheat into trucks at Peter Waterhouse’ East Maya property. (Supplied: Peter Waterhouse)

Dad’s discontinued cup search for son with autism

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Twitter: Photos of Ben's cup That’s a lot of cups,” he posted in an update.Mr Carter said he had been “moved to tears” by the help offered by others.”You have genuinely helped us as a family and given Ben the chance to have lots more cups which are so important in his very complicated little life,” he said.Tommee Tippee asked anyone who believed they have the cup to send them a private message on Facebook with an image. A UK father’s search for a discontinued blue cup his son with severe autism drinks exclusively from has sparked responses from around the world.Marc Carter said in a post on Twitter his son Ben, 14, has drunk from a blue Tommee Tippee two-handed cup since he was two years old.But he said the cups disintegrated over time, rendering them unusable, and his current one did not have long left, after three years of use.”These cups are not made anymore, the replacements are all new and fancy, we’ve tried them, Ben throws them at us,” Mr Carter, who posts as @GrumpyCarer, said.”People say he will drink when he’s thirsty, but two emergency trips to A&E (accident and emergency department) with severe dehydration say otherwise.”In all honesty we are really worried what will happen if [the cup] falls apart completely.”
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Mr Carter, who said he is a full-time carer to his three children, asked if others had the older model “stuck at the back of a cupboard” and offered to pay for cups and postage.Tommee Tippee later offered to provide free postage, in a post on their Facebook page.It said, because the cups were an old model, they no longer have the production tools to make them.”We’ve had a dedicated team searching high and low for this particular cup and have not only checked our archives but have been as far as searching through our cupboards,” the company posted.”So far, we’ve found that the cup was made in the 1990s and was made especially for [pharmacy] Boots.”Mr Carter said Tommee Tippee have found one cup, while social media users had organised to send him “enough to last us a few years”.But he said more were needed.”The reality is Ben is unlikely to change, so I will need these for the rest of his life.
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Marc Carter said his son Ben has drunk from a blue Tommee Tippee cup since he was two years old. (Twitter: Marc Carter)
Updated

November 16, 2016 20:04:18
Thousands of birthday cards for boy with autism