Paralympians become mini Lego toy figurines

External Link:

Photo of Lego version of Yip Pin Xiu and Theresa Goh

Map:
Singapore
Updated

September 16, 2016 13:52:00
The 24-year-old, who suffers from muscular dystrophy, broke the world record with a time of 2:07.09.Teammate Goh won bronze in the 100m backstroke SB4, her first win from four Paralympic Games since making her debut in Athens in 2004.The toy manufacturer posted a photo of the immortalised athletes on their Facebook page, receiving more than 4,000 reactions.In a comment to Lego’s post, Goh replied: “Hahahah oh man this is great! Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong congratulated the swimmer on Facebook.”Pin Xiu, you have made Singapore very proud today,” he said.The toy brickmaker’s range of collectible figurines, which range from Superheroes to Star Wars characters are extremely popular with fans. The athlete was recently reclassified as an S2 swimmer as her condition worsens and progressively weakens her bones.Pin Xiu is hoping to take home a second gold, if she wins the 50m backstroke, which will make her the first Singaporean to win multiple gold medals at the same Games. Thank you!!”
External Link:

Yip Pin Xiu emotional Instagram post after swim
Lego has launched a five piece Paralympics set to “celebrate sporting achievement and overcome adversity”.Those sentiments were expressed in a personal Instagram post from Pin Xiu.”Nobody knows our journey like us,” he said. Lego has honoured Singapore Paralympians Yip Pin Xiu and Theresa Goh with two look-alike minifigurines – complete with matching swimmers and medals – to celebrate their achievements in Rio.Pin Xiu took home Singapore’s first medal in Rio winning the 100m S2 backstroke event.

75yo completes 75 marathons in 75 days

(Facebook: Ray Matthews) Posted

September 15, 2016 15:02:38

Photo:
Ray Matthews says he always had faith his challenge could be done.
I’ve always had faith that it could be done — that’s why I set the challenge.”Every marathon has been painful, but it has been a pain that has been able to be managed in general.”Most of the routes were organised by running clubs in South Yorkshire, but he also finished two marathons in Rotherham’s twin town, St-Quentin, in France.Mr Matthews has raised more than 13,100 pounds so far to “provide rubber playground areas and entertainment facilities”. A 75-year-old man has run 75 marathons in 75 days to raise money for a special needs school in Rotherham in north-east England. I’ve really enjoyed it. External Link:

Marathon 26 for Ray Matthews
“Other people have doubted me, but that’s fine. External Link:

Marathon 8 for Ray Matthews
Ray Matthews said it had been his dream to provide Newman Special School — a specialist school for children with disabilities — with new facilities, since seeing first-hand the “amazing work” all of the staff at the school provided.But he said the task of raising at least 75,000 pounds ($133,165) for the new facilities warranted “an equally spectacular challenge”.Completing the marathon challenge would also serve as a birthday present to himself, he said.”I don’t know any other birthday present that will last for 75 days really,” he told the BBC.He began the challenge on July 2 and finished on September 14, arriving at the school grounds to finish off his last run to the cheers of supporters.”It’s been tough at times, but generally better than I had expected,” he said.”I’ve had so many great people I’ve never met before who’ve given me fantastic comments and money as well.
Map:
United Kingdom

Singing, strumming students bring joy to cancer patients

Ukulele lessons for homeless people
Related Story:
(ABC Far North: Mark Rigby)
Sacrifice brings overseas travel rewardsShe said while they were not nervous about performing in the ukulele’s home nation, they were more than a little bit intimidated by the thought.”It’s definitely very intimidating, but it’ll be a good experience,” Cara said.For Mr Walker, the girls’ overseas invitations are the perfect reward for their efforts.”The thing that I get the most out of it is that the girls started this by giving up their Wednesday afternoons to do community service,” he said.”They were doing it to go out and make a difference, not for fame or anything like that, and they’ve seen that they actually bring a lot of joy.”But they’ve actually got a lot of good things come out of it, from a very selfless perspective to start with.” In the cool, sterile environment of a hospital oncology ward, the gentle strumming of ukulele strings and the warm voices of four high school students cuts through the silence.They are the Ukulele Angels, a group of students from St Andrew’s Catholic College in Cairns who volunteer their time to brighten the lives of cancer patients.”We hope it makes receiving treatment a little bit more enjoyable,” Cara McIlveen, one of the group’s lead voices said.”The silence gets to be a bit deafening up here so hopefully the music just brings a little bit more joy into the room.”Not an easy gig for ‘mature’ young womenThe group largely covers happy pop songs, from the back catalogues of artists such as Bob Marley, Vance Joy and Amy Winehouse.”We like to keep a nice beat; we want to make sure the vibe and the environment is nice and that’s something we’re always cautious of,” Safron Ealden said.The girls’ teacher Luke Walker said the group started playing in the hospital’s paediatric ward more than two years ago.”We just wanted to bring the ukulele to people who can’t otherwise get to see it,” he said.”From there it started and the hospital really liked it so after a while they asked us to come up to oncology.”He said the girls had grown, both as musicians and personally, as a result of their performances on the wards and had shown great maturity dealing with sometimes unfortunate circumstances.”They aren’t always easy gigs to play,” he said.”Sometimes you come back and the people you played to the week before just aren’t there anymore.”

Photo:
Mr Walker said the ukulele’s size meant the girls rarely put them down while travelling, and rarely stop playing them. Photo:
Ukulele Angels, (L-R) Sophie Dahlenburg, Safron Ealden, Cara McIlveen, Mia Peled-Bolger (front), with teacher, Andrew Walker. (ABC Far North: Mark Rigby)
Invited to Japan and HawaiiAs the Ukulele Angels became more experienced with their instruments, the demand for their performances grew and they soon began to perform paid gigs.Now the group has been invited to perform in Japan.”We’re going to visit Otsuma High School where there’s a cultural festival that we’ll be playing at,” Safron said.”Because they’re our sister school, a lot of their students come to us, but now it’s finally our turn to go over to them and show them what we can do and share it with them.”Before returning to Australia the girls have also been invited to tour the Koaloha Ukulele Factory in Hawaii.”We’re very excited to do that and I think we’ll be playing some music over there as well,” Cara said.

Related Story:
(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter) ABC Far North

By

Mark Rigby

Posted

September 16, 2016 10:42:28

Photo:
The Ukulele Angels have been playing to patients at Cairns Hospital for more than two years.
Brisbane engineer-turned-luthier helps music lovers build guitars
Map:
Cairns 4870

World’s oldest man to hold bar mitzvah 100 years later

The world’s oldest man will be celebrating his bar mitzvah 100 years late at the age of 113, after he missed it due to the outbreak of World War I.Yisrael Kristal was meant to have his Jewish coming-of-age ceremony back in 1916, but will instead be celebrating it in two weeks’ time to coincide with his birthday according to the Hebrew calendar.The celebration will be held at a synagogue in Haifa, Israel, where Mr Kristal lives, and several generations of his family will be attending.”We are excited, we’re happy, it is a great honour to celebrate his bar mitzvah,” daughter Shula Kuperstoch told the BBC.”He has children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and cousins and everyone is coming.”

Photo:
Several generations of Yisrael Kristal’s family will be attending. (Guinness World Records)
She said it would be a “corrective experience” for her father, who was officially recognised by Guinness World Records as the world’s oldest man in March.When Mr Kristal was 13 — the usual age for the bar mitzvah — there had been no-one to preside over his ceremony as his father was in the Russian army and his mother had passed away.He moved to the Polish city of Lodz in 1920 after WWI, but when the country was invaded by Nazi Germany in 1939 he and his family were moved into the Lodz ghetto, where his two children died.He and his wife were then sent to Auschwitz four years later, where she was killed.Mr Kristal was the sole survivor of his family and, along with his second wife and son, emigrated in 1950 to Israel.
(AFP: Shula Kopershtouk)

Map:
Israel Photo:
Yisrael Kristal was meant to have his Jewish male coming-of-age ceremony back in 1916.
Posted

September 16, 2016 11:08:15

Kids take to airwaves at aged care centre radio station

Radio DJs of all ages are taking to the airwaves at a narrow-cast station set up at an aged care facility in northern New South Wales.Students from St Joseph’s Primary School are the latest hosts to have secured a weekly radio program at the Baptist Care Maranoa Centre in Alstonville.

Map:
Alstonville 2477
ABC North Coast

By

Samantha Turnbull

Posted

September 16, 2016 11:21:05

External Link:

Kids radio station video
Audio:
(ABC North Coast: Samantha Turnbull)
Maranoa’s lifestyle and memory care therapist Samantha Tuck said the radio station had been of most benefit to the centre’s residents with dementia.”We have one lady in particular whose verbal communication has declined quite considerably,” she said.”When we bring her into the radio room we put the earphones on and it’s the most amazing thing to see.”She will start bopping along to the music and within a couple of minutes she can be clear as a bell, singing the words word for word.”The smile on her face, the joy, it just changes her whole persona and she’s lucid for that 10 minutes or so that she’s in there with that song.”And the most popular music at the centre?”Definitely Andre Rieu,” Ms Tuck said.”We get a bit sick of him sometimes.” “I guess there’s that anonymity about it: you’re there and the listeners are out there and they don’t know what you look like,” he said.”All they’re really hearing is your voice, so you can portray what you’d like the listeners to know or hear.”

Photo:
Maranoa resident Stuart MacDonald is vision-impaired but says that doesn’t stop him from hosting a radio program at the aged care facility. Photo:
Amelia Paulsen and Daniel Pereira hope to become professional DJs. (ABC North Coast: Samantha Turnbull)
John Warbrook, 83, became such a fan of the programs he decided to donate 180 CDs and records to the station.He said the residents approved of his taste.”Because my taste is their taste,” Mr Warbrook said.”A lot of people turn their radios on at night and it’s good to see [the CDs] are not getting wasted.”

Photo:
John Warbrook, 83, donated 180 CDs and records to the narrow-cast radio station at the Baptist Care Maranoa Centre in Alstonville. (ABC North Coast: Samantha Turnbull)
“The advantage to radio is that they don’t need to be seen by anyone and that’s a big fear with a lot of young students,” she said.”But once they relax, most of them can speak beautifully.”Maranoa residents also take turns behind the microphone.Stuart MacDonald is vision-impaired, but said the radio show offered a sense of inclusiveness. Daniel Pereira, 11, opens the show with the school song, before launching into reading news, sport and weather reports.He said he hoped the experience would be a springboard to a career in the media.”As soon as I saw this room I thought it was awesome to have this opportunity,” he said.”To be on air makes it feel really real — well it is — but I just really love the feeling.”St Joseph’s Radio Club co-ordinator Libby Spash said the show had been a great way for students to develop their public speaking skills.
Students hit airwaves in aged care facility

(ABC News)

40-year milestone brings fashionable friends back together

(105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon) 105.7 ABC Darwin

By

Emilia Terzon

Posted

September 16, 2016 16:30:55

Photo:
Helen Thomson and Suzie Hesketh have been friends and business partners for more than 40 years.
Related Story:
Edgy. I intend to be around a bit longer.”To celebrate the 40th anniversary, Ms Thomson came back to Darwin this week, something she had not done in 20-odd years.”When Sue picked me up from the airport last night, it was such a joy. After 40 years of buying trips and working the shop floor, Suzie Hesketh is today Darwin’s longest running women’s fashion store owner and a well-known matriarch to younger shop girls in the city mall.Like many things in Darwin, it all started with a post-Cyclone Tracy friendship.”Helen taught me everything I know, really,” Ms Hesketh said.Toowoomba-born Helen Thomson moved to Darwin with her husband in early 1974 and soon bought a women’s fashion boutique called Ali Bird.”I’d never been in fashion. It’s a terrible loss. I really didn’t have a choice,” Ms Thomson said of selling up shop.’What have I done?’Once Ms Hesketh started, it was discovered she was barely able to take up hems.”Her first day on the job I thought: What have I done?” Ms Thomson said. I learned quickly. Photo:
Safari suits were all the rage in Darwin in the ’70s. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
In late 1976 Ms Thomson, satisfied that her friend had things covered, handed over the store keys to Ms Hesketh and went interstate as planned.”It was sad giving up the business, but that’s how things are. I had to and I just did it, as one does,” Ms Thomson said.In late 1974 Cyclone Tracy struck Darwin, tearing apart homes, businesses, lives and families. She had a fabulous eye for fashion. (Supplied: MAGNT)
“In those days labels would hold a fashion parade to show you the pieces. All the skills are gone,” Ms Kesketh said.”I’ve just followed the market and whatever the people want I try and accommodate. These days it’s all boxes out of China. Things change in your life and I was going to Cairns. I had to watch Helen,” Ms Hesketh said.”She was very stylish. She’s a beautiful person,” she said. But Ms Hesketh stuck it out in fashion retail, looking to her new boss for advice on selling, buying and tropical style.”I had no idea. Photo:
Houses destroyed by Cyclone Tracy on Christmas Day 1974 (Supplied: Baz Ledwidge)
Ms Thomson’s fashion store was flooded yet structurally intact, so she ripped up the carpet, turned long gowns ruined by the storm surge into short frocks, and re-opened for business early the next year.”There were only two stores left standing in Darwin after the cyclone,” Ms Thomson said.”[Business] was pretty good, even though the female population had dwindled with evacuations.”New friendship in wake of cycloneAround the same time as Ali Bird was re-opening, Ms Hesketh arrived in Darwin to work with an insurance company paying out claims to cyclone survivors.”Helen’s little boutique happened to be next door to the insurance office,” she said.”She had an 18-month-old baby and I used to stop and play with him in his pram.”Ms Thomson, who like many in those post-Tracy months faced a babysitter shortage and brought her child to work, decided to lure Ms Hesketh away from her corporate job.”She seemed smart and nice, so I offered her a job. She said I probably couldn’t afford her.”Eventually in 1976, Ms Thomson brought on Ms Hesketh for the then substantial wage of $150 a week and the lure of giving her “first option” on buying the business that year.”My marriage had problems and I decided that I wanted to leave Darwin. She brought young fashion to Darwin. That’s how I’ve survived. She was a fashion doyenne in those days in Darwin.”Ms Hesketh soon learned the trade — “I proved Helen wrong” — and discovered that she loved helping women feel “good about themselves”. Photo:
Suzie Hesketh sells dresses, stylish office clothing and shoes mostly to young women. We once had a huge one about something needing to be done that ended in Suzie screaming, ‘I have six kids’.”Forty years after taking over, Ms Kesbeth’s now re-named Just Looking boutique is still going strong in Darwin, although much has changed in retail over the years.Flares and safari suits have been replaced by versatile office and womenswear, and many of the labels being sold are no longer Australian-made like they were in the ’70s. She makes me so happy. I didn’t have style myself. “Best decision I ever made was hiring her and getting to know her.” I had a young child to consider,” Ms Thomson said.Friendship and business partnership continuesWhen Ms Thomson moved to Queensland, the duo stayed in close contact and in the early 1980s went into business together to open up the first Cue store in Cairns.Several more fashion ventures followed, as well as property investment.Today, the duo said the elements that made their partnership work included “trust”, “a listening ear” and “having the same eye”.”We just love each other,” Ms Thomson added.”But we did have a few fallouts. Fabulous.
Mary and Maude: Darwin's op-shop veterans
Shoemaker puts heart and sole into bespoke leatherwork
Related Story:

Map:
Darwin 0800

Japanese granny ‘Dreamgirls’ bitten by cheerleading bug

(AFP: Toru Yamanaka) Updated

September 16, 2016 17:13:13

Photo:
The grannies gather each week for intense training, analysing videos of themselves to improve.
Related Story:
Netball keeps me young: 69yo notches up decades on court
Related Story:
Meet Australia's next swimming record holders
Strutting her stuff in a gold-hemmed mini-skirt, white leather boots and shaking silver pom poms, 84-year-old Fumie Takino has discovered her elixir of youth — cheerleading.Ms Takino and her troupe of spirited grannies tweak the nose of old age, even if their rambunctious routine to the song Dreamgirls leaves them painfully out of breath and their pink tank tops dripping with sweat.Ms Takino has spearheaded the group of more than 20 bubbly seniors for some two decades, founding the Japan Pom Pom squad after being bitten by the cheerleading bug — despite it traditionally being the preserve of teenage girls — in her sixties.”You have to be 55 or older,” Ms Takino said, referring to the qualification for joining her team, the average age of which is 70.”Once you hit the age of 70, you have to admit it’s downhill,” she said with a smile.”We’ve come a long way in 20 years!” she added.Japan is renowned for its sprightly pensioners — women live for an average of 87 years and men to 80.But the average “healthy” lifespan is 10 years less for both sexes, meaning many suffer physical and mental ailments in the final decade of life.Ms Takino, however, insists that her glamorous hobby has helped mitigate the effects of ageing — making her feel mentally and physically more agile.She took up the activity when her relationship with her husband began to falter.She explained: “My marriage was not going well. Photo:
Earlier this year, the Japan Pom Pom team celebrated its 20th anniversary. I put up with it until my children got married”.Middle age emboldened troupe leaderMs Takino said she would not have had the confidence to pick up the pompoms in her youth, explaining that she became emboldened by changes she made in middle age.The first came at the age of 53 — when she packed up and flew to Texas to study.It was against the wishes of her ageing mother, but she said her children supported her decision. (AFP: Toru Yamanaka)
After completing a master’s degree in gerontology at the University of North Texas and a work placement in New York, she returned home with a new-found sense of freedom.But it was actually in Japan that she encountered the quintessentially American activity of cheerleading with its eye-popping array of moves, from human towers, somersaults and back flips.It took off in Japan around 30 years ago, though remains rare outside school and university environments.”It blew my mind,” Ms Takino said.She immediately rounded up five friends to start her own troupe after first hearing about cheerleading.’When you get old, you keep losing friends’Two decades later, the grannies gather each week for intense training — and while they do not overdo the acrobatics, they take practice seriously, even analysing videos of themselves to improve.Earlier this year, the team celebrated its 20th anniversary by performing as guests at Japan’s annual United Spirit Association (USA) Nationals competition, where mostly high school and university teams compete.Given their age, some members have to drop out for health issues or to care for ageing spouses, but new recruits are easy to find.Shinko Kusajima, in her late sixties, said forging new personal bonds was a huge attraction.”When you get old, you keep losing friends,” she said at a practice where she hoped to become a new member.”But you always have mates here to share a good time.”

Photo:
Fumie Takino says cheerleading has helped her feel mentally and physically more agile. (AFP: Toru Yamanaka)
AFP
Map:
Japan

Elderly man with Alzheimer’s scores record deal after ‘car karaoke’ goes viral

An 80-year-old British man diagnosed with dementia three years ago has been offered a record deal after online videos of him singing in the car went viral.Ted McDermott, known as Teddy Mac, has been signed up by Decca Records after ‘car karaoke’ videos posted by his son Simon were watched 40 million times online.Simon found that singing as the two drove round Blackburn, in northern England, helped his father cope with his Alzheimer’s disease.He posted videos of the drives with his father online to increase awareness for the Alzheimer’s Society, after the advice and support the McDermott family received from the organisation’s national Dementia Helpline following their father’s diagnosis.More than $197,000 has been raised so far.”This is a dream come true not only for Dad but for the entire family,” Simon McDermott told the Alzheimer’s Society.”There have been some really tough days in the last few years, especially for Mum. The more the Alzheimer’s kicked in, the more Dad became aggressive, both physically and verbally.”It was incredibly difficult to manage and terrifying at times.”

Photo:
Teddy Mac has signed a record deal after decades working as a holiday camp entertainer. (Facebook: The Songaminute Man)
Mr McDermott has difficulty recognising his son but after decades working as a holiday camp entertainer could remember the words to a number of Frank Sinatra songs, including Quando, Quando, Quando.Jeremy Hughes, chief executive at the Alzheimer’s Society, said music could have a positive impact on people with dementia and that favourite songs or pieces could also be powerful prompts for reminiscence.”This is clearly the case when Teddy sings and is transported back to his time as an entertainer,” Mr Hughes said.Now Teddy Mac will be headed for chart success with his own version of the Frank Sinatra classic You Make Me Feel So Young, to be released September 23.Royalties from the single will be split between the Alzheimer’s Society and the McDermott family.
Map:
United Kingdom
Qld researchers study link with brain training, mindfulness and dementia
Related Story:
Related Story:
Updated

September 17, 2016 11:51:00

External Link:

Quando Quando Quando – The Songaminute Man
People with dementia among the 'loneliest' in Australia

Triathlete helped by brother in dramatic race finish

Map:
Mexico
It’s not the way I wanted it, but that’s triathlon.” External Link:

Tweet: @jonny_brownlee: Not how I wanted to end the season, but gave it everything. External Link:

Tweet: @worldtriathlon: The 2016 WTS season ends in a dramatic fashion. Thanks @AliBrownleetri, your loyalty is incredible
In the post-race interview, Alistair Brownlee said his brother began to fade in “an awful position”.”If he clunks out 1k from the finish line there is no medical support, it is a dangerous position to be in,” he said.”Obviously the World Series is a big race, but I just had to do what was right in that situation.”Mola, who won his first world title, said he was resigned to finishing the season in second but found an extra gear when he heard Jonathan Brownlee was struggling to complete the race.”When I heard Jonny isn’t feeling well, I thought ‘I need to fight to the end’,” he said.”We want everyone to be safe after the finish line. But heat exhaustion hit as he approached the finish, with the 26-year-old appearing disoriented as his legs began to give way.Medical staff were about to take hold of Jonathan when his brother, Alistair, intervened and helped him finish the race.As they completed the final straight, Alistair shoved Jonathan over the line, allowing him to take second.While South Africa’s Henri Schopman won the event, Jonathan Brownlee’s second-place kept him in contention to win the season title.However, Spain’s Mario Mola was able to surge late to claim fifth in Cozumel, which was enough for him to hold on to the overall lead.Jonathan Brownlee, who won silver in Rio behind Alistair, was taken to hospital for safety precautions after the race.Race judges rejected an appeal for Jonathan Brownlee to be disqualified, in accordance with rules that permit athletes to receive assistance from fellow competitors.’A dangerous position to be in’Hours after the race Jonathan Brownlee tweeted pictures from his hospital bed and thanked his brother. Year. What. The 2016 World Triathlon Series grand final has ended in dramatic fashion, with a British competitor pushing his brother across the line in a desperate bid to help him win the world title.Jonathan Brownlee was leading the race in Cozumel, Mexico, and on course to win the title with less than a kilometre to go. A.
Related Story:
British brothers take out gold and silver in Olympic triathlon
Updated

September 20, 2016 20:31:15

Video: Jonathan Brownlee pushed over the World Triathlon Series finish line by brother Alistair

(ABC News)

Perth Zoo Galapagos tortoise turns 50, eats watermelon cake

Meet the Galapagos Islands' gigolo tortoise
Photo:
Cerro’s cake included watermelon, kiwi fruit, pumpkin and strawberries. Some people may not embrace turning 50 but one of Perth Zoo’s oldest residents, Cerro the Galapagos tortoise, has celebrated the birthday with vigour.At more than 200 kilograms, Cerro is considered a youngster, with the oldest Galapagos tortoise on record thought to be around 175 years old.Perth Zoo marked his 50th birthday on Monday with a specially created cake made up of some of his favourite treats, including watermelon, kiwi fruit, pumpkin and strawberries.”These tortoises don’t have a good sense of smell, so they use their eyes to find food,” zookeeper Emily Trainer said.”Anything red really gets Cerro’s attention; he loves any brightly coloured foods.”Ms Trainer said Cerro was the less dominant of the zoo’s two Galapagos tortoises. (Supplied: Perth Zoo)
“Except when there is food around — then he gets a bit of speed up to make sure he eats first,” she said.”Cerro tends to lead a peaceful, lazy life.”When not spending his time eating, he enjoys a dip in his pond, a play in his mud wallow and he is also very smart, so we do training sessions with him as well.”Cerro was originally born at San Diego Zoo and arrived in Perth with his younger brother Sierra in 2005.While he was celebrated for reaching his half century, he still has a long way to go in age and exploits to match another Galapagos tortoise found at the Californian zoo.Diego, at 100, has almost single-handedly rebuilt his species’ population on their native island, Espanola — the southern-most in the Galapagos Archipelago — after fathering an estimated 800 offspring.
Related Story:
(Supplied: Perth Zoo) Posted

September 19, 2016 19:48:04

Photo:
Cerro was treated with a birthday cake of a different sort.
Map:
Perth 6000

Performers with disabilities to perform ballet in Hobart

Now in Second Echo Ensemble’s performance, Fortescue has become an orchestra of one. “We haven’t got a Sydney Orchestra here, nor have we even got a string quartet, we’ve got me and I play the double bass,” he said.”We sort of interact with the dance, so I improvise a fair bit of it.”

Photo:
David Montgomery and Alex Morris Baguley are members of the group. (ABC News: Felicity Ogilvie)
Last night the audience was delighted with the performance, which ran as the lead act at the Salamanca Dance Festival.One of the performers, 25-year-old Alex Morris Baguley, said while she used to get stage fright, she now enjoyed the spotlight. “I love performing in this group, because it shows me how to shine,” she said.”You can see from the look on their [the audience’s] faces, that ‘wow, this is just amazing’, and experience people with a disability in the performance arts.”

Audio:
(ABC News: Felicity Ogilvie) AM

By Felicity Ogilvie

Updated

September 21, 2016 14:38:51

Photo:
Luke Campbell, one of the performers with The Second Echo Ensemble.

Map:
Hobart 7000
Photo:
David Montgomery is one of the performers in this year’s Salamanca Dance Festival in Hobart. (ABC News: Felicity Ogilvie)
‘It’s about the challenges of love’Ms Drummond Cawthon said the performance was about exploring the themes of love and spring.”We’ve looked at the challenges of love, we’ve looked at — both for our ensemble members with disability and those that do not identify with disability — where the blockages are to love and where we’ve been told we can or cannot love,” she said.The music for the Rite of Spring will be performed by Michael Fortescue, who spent 37 years playing the double bass at the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra. (ABC News: Felicity Ogilvie)
‘Showing the diversity of the voices that are part of our world’The Second Echo Ensemble’s production of the Rite of Spring has been the vision of the show’s creative producer, Kelly Drummond Cawthon.”The purpose is really to create an exceptional performance and to show the diversity of the voices that are part of our world,” she said.”There’s a percentage of our population now that live with a disability or live with intellectual difference and challenges, and when do they have an opportunity to share the way that they experience the world?”We’re looking at diverse theatre that is inclusive of the most beautiful of all of us.”

Photo:
Second Echo Ensemble are presenting a modern version of the classic Russian ballet The Rite of Spring. The Second Echo Ensemble are an integrated performance group who believe anyone can dance, and include people with disabilities in their troupe.They opened this year’s Salamanca Dance Festival in Hobart, presenting a modern version of the classic Russian ballet The Rite of Spring.”Dancing is good, dancing is [how I] perform my act and I am born to act,” said David Montgomery, one of the group’s dancers.
Listen to Felicity Ogilvie's story

(AM)

Houdini dog racks up $4,000 in council fines

Map:
Bellingen 2454
Man 'nearly dies' while saving dog from flooded Melbourne creek
Related Story:
ABC Coffs Coast

By

Ruby Cornish

Posted

September 22, 2016 07:52:11

Photo:
Honey is an unusually resourceful escape dog. (ABC News: Ruby Cornish)
Related Story:

A dog owner is asking his local council to show some flexibility in the way nuisance dogs are dealt with, after clocking up nearly $4,000 in fines.Justin Brow, of Bellingen in New South Wales, has spent years trying to dog-proof his backyard, but his unusually resourceful kelpie Honey keeps finding new ways to escape.”She’s the canine equivalent of Houdini. (ABC News: Ruby Cornish)
Honey set to be adopted by aged care facilityMr Brow said the main reason behind Honey’s repeated escapes was a desire to socialise, and plans were in the works to make her an official therapy dog at Bellingen’s aged care facility, Bellorana.”She has a really sweet energy and I think as a therapy dog that’s perfect,” he said.”She doesn’t jump up, she doesn’t lick, she’ll just sit by someone’s side.”He said Honey had already spent a few days at the facility, and the feedback had been positive.”The doctor told me there had been one guy who had a stroke and couldn’t use his hands, and when Honey turned up he started patting her totally normally,” he said.”There’s talk of [Bellorana] actually adopting her full-stop, though my family will still hang out with her.”It’s going to be a really good outcome.” (ABC News: Ruby Cornish)
Mr Brow said Honey’s escapes had not gone unnoticed by local authorities, and he was now on a payment plan to help him deal with dozens of fines issued by the local ranger.”It’s become this ongoing war between me trying to contain the dog and the local ranger,” he said.More flexible system neededMr Brow said the way the system was set up meant he was always fined before he had a chance to get Honey off the street.”[The ranger] doesn’t do anything about getting her off the streets. And my yard is like Fort Knox,” he said.Mr Brow has attached extra wire barriers to his regular timber fence, reinforced parts of it with corrugated iron, and poured cement along the fence-line to prevent Honey digging holes underneath.He said no matter what, the dog always managed to get out and roam free.”There’s a feeling I get sometimes, that she turns into smoke and re-forms on the other side of the fence,” he said.”I’ve had dogs since I was four years old, but this dog is different.”She’ll sit and look, and you can see that she’s reasoning, trying to find a weak spot.”There are times when she’s been contained in the enclosed verandah and she’s dug up the floorboards.”

Photo:
Mr Brow says his backyard is like Fort Knox, but there is no obstacle that can stop his cunning dog from escaping. Photo:
Mr Brow says Honey loves socialising. Photo:
Mr Brow has received nearly $4,000 in fines from the Bellingen Shire Council. He just takes a photo from his car and I get a printout attached to a fine,” he said.”I understand he’s got his responsibility, but this is simply revenue-raising. (ABC News: Ruby Cornish)
“He could quite easily give me a buzz and I’d happily come and get her. That would be entirely reasonable.”There’s a different way he could be doing his job, that reflects Bellingen’s sense of community.”Bellingen Shire Council general manager Liz Jeremy said in a statement there was a process in place to discuss strategies with dog owners to prevent their pets roaming.”Most dog owners will voluntarily comply with the legislation and are not usually the subject of any future incidents or complaints,” she said.Where dogs had been declared a nuisance dog, as Honey had, Ms Jeremy said there was a requirement that they be managed more responsibly.”Generally these dogs have been repeatedly observed to be roaming in a public place,” she said.The council declined to comment on Mr Brow’s particular circumstances.
Troop Cat Ed at home with Sydney Mounted Police

Camp helps kids with a disability find their voice

Map:
Redland Bay 4165
(612 ABC Brisbane: Terri Begley) 612 ABC Brisbane

By Terri Begley and Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

September 22, 2016 12:21:58

Photo:
Finley learns to communicate with his mother using a device.
(612 ABC Brisbane: Terri Begley)
At home she can understand and chat with her son without the technology, but said it would become more important as he grew up.”Coming here it encourages you and reminds you why you’re doing it and the long term,” she said.”That long-term goal is for him to be a fully communicating adult that can speak without assistance from anyone else.”The family has been using communication devices since Finley was two years old.Currently they use a device called the Liberator, which can find any word in the dictionary after just three taps.”The most exciting thing about it is that he can get his own thoughts out,” Ms Coll said.”He says exactly what he wants to say.”
External Link:

Learn more about Finley's story
Through his device, Finley said the camp had allowed him to speak more.”We wrote and performed our own play and I really enjoyed it and I love being on stage,” he said.Finley said having an electronic device gave him a voice.”It means people can know me and what I think.” Photo:
Camper Finley speaks with his mum using an electronic device. (Supplied: Camp Have a Chat)
“Most of the communication is done using symbols and a little bit of signing too.”She said technology had helped break down communication problems.”Tablets make communication cheaper and more accessible for kids,” Ms Nivala said.”It also makes it more trendy for the kids to have a tablet with them and normalises it.”It’s only going to get more exciting and offer more opportunities to the kids that come along to the camp.” Amanda Coll said the camp allowed her son Finley the chance to learn how to talk more with others. A special camp in Queensland is teaching children with disabilities, who can’t speak, how to use technology to talk to family and friends.Choice Passion Life (formerly the Cerebral Palsy League) runs Camp Have a Chat, which helps school-aged children with complex communication issues to discover their own voice.The group of 18 has been undertaking the four-day camp in Redland Bay, north of Brisbane, this week.The only initiative of its kind in Queensland, campers were given a range of communication devices to help them talk with others.”We have children using communication books, assisted technology and iPads with communication software,” camp coordinator Karen Nivala said

Photo:
Children are taught how to talk through devices at the Camp Have a Chat camp.

Growth spurt for Darwin athletics club for youths with disabilities

Map:
Darwin 0800
How to discuss disabilities and the Paralympics with children
I thought we could [help him out].”Membership fees were waived to incorporate the tiny club into DAC, opening them up to professional facilities and uniform sponsorship, yet the group still struggled to grow beyond eight members.Membership doublesThis year consultation with disability stakeholder groups uncovered a participation barrier: transport.With a good chunk of Darwin’s children with disabilities living in care or coming from disadvantaged families, Ms Tune realised many were missing out.After a local charity offered up a shuttle bus, several parents volunteered as drivers and since then participation rates have doubled.”You’re not relying on the parents [or carers] who are maybe tired, exhausted, have other children, competing interests,” Ms Tune said.”It’s a regular dependable thing that they’ve been able to just come along.”Coach hopeful for Darwin’s next ParalympianAfter he stopped going to practice a few years ago due to transport issues, 15-year-old Scott Stevenson was this year welcomed back into the fold with help from the shuttle service.”My favourite thing is long jump and discus. Photo:
Participants range from very young up to high school students, with the club now set to open up to include all ages. He fronted up again this week.”Sixteen-year-old Dawyte Clancy has been with the group for several years and has won several gold medals in discus.”From when I started, I just fell in love with it,” he said.”This is one of the main sports that I do. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
Today a Paralympics classifier, Mr Mitchener is certain Romone has what it takes for the Tokyo Paralympics in 2020.Yet he said that whether his Monday night athletes won Paralympics gold or just aimed to take out Lion King, what continued to motivate him was seeing everybody participate.”Sport is all inclusive. Direct fatal hit to the head but he’s still the same. Photo:
Assistant coach Lara, Romone, Paul Mitchener and Dawyte on the track. Photo:
Siblings of core members also participate. I’ve just got a fire in the belly about it,” she said.Grant funding would also help support Paralympics hopefuls, including former rugby player Romone Lewis who suffered a brain injury in a quad bike crash last year.Now living with limited speech and a blanket ban on contact sports, this month Romone came within 12 per cent of the world record time for his disability in the 200-metre sprint.”[I like] running fast,” he said. It shouldn’t have people sitting on the sidelines because they’re sitting in a chair or have a leg missing.”Sport is for everybody.” “I learned how to be a soccer coach and Dwayte learned how to be a goalie.”The last-minute soccer team made it to the finals undefeated — and then claimed the national trophy. It’s what keeps me going throughout the week.”Community chips in to boost groupDespite operating without government funding, in 2012 the after-school group headed to Newcastle for its first Special Olympics, expecting to compete in athletics and swimming.”When we arrived we discovered that soccer was also on the program, so we quickly entered a mixed team of swimmers and athletes,” Mr Mitchener said. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
Now determined to access government grants, Ms Tune said the group hopes to further expand its capabilities, with it recently opening up to all ages and disabilities.Ms Tune said while the group’s members were welcome to participate in all DAC classes, expanding the disability-focused group allowed everybody to shine with support and come together as a community.”I’ve quit my role as president to focus on this group. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
In 2014 the group caught the attention of the Darwin Athletics Club (DAC) after its president Kylie Tune “kept being told about this coach Mitch”.”He was coming on his little scooter with a little backpack full of bicycle tubes that he’d use for resistance training. They pick the kids up. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)
Today Mr Mitchener, known to everybody as Mitch, runs a Monday night group that includes very young children right up to high school students, most with intellectual disabilities.Activities include long jump, running, mini hurdles and Mr Mitchener’s unique version of target practice.”We use soft toys [to] give the kids something to aim at rather than the empty grass,” he said.”We killed Lion King last week with the javelin. Animal welfare officer Paul Mitchener describes his after-hours passion as something that he “just fell into” 15 years ago while coaching his own children’s athletics team.Darwin’s only dedicated athletics group for young people with disabilities started with one child he noticed sitting on the sidelines.”They were just sitting there watching everybody else and not participating,” he said.”It looked like they wanted to.”

Photo:
The soft toys are Paul Mitchener’s unique brand of target practice. It’s fabulous what they do,” she said.Ms Campbell hopes to send a younger child to athletics too, although achieving this would probably require a dedicated support worker during Monday night practice. I like coming here because I’ve got lots of friends,” he said.His guardian Rose Campbell looks after several other children with disabilities and described the athletics group’s new shuttle service as a godsend.”I just couldn’t get him there.

Related Story:
105.7 ABC Darwin

By

Emilia Terzon

Updated

September 22, 2016 16:08:09

Photo:
Paul Mitchener (left) has been running an athletics clubs for youths with disabilities for 15 years. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Emilia Terzon)

Could this be Australia’s most eclectic fashionista?

By

Margaret Burin

Updated

September 23, 2016 09:36:49
I said the numbers keep turning. (ABC News)
Her passion for fashion began about 23 years ago when she was on a business trip with her husband Howard. “He said, ‘why don’t you buy a little hat?’,” she says.”It was like a dam wall had burst. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Melbourne woman Dee Goldberg in her outfit made out of soft toys. Dee lives in Australia’s self-proclaimed style capital, but she has a very different view of fashion to many Melburnians. There are no limits. And many of them tell a story; delving into themes like Aboriginal rights and her shame of apartheid in her birth country. “It’s my hobby,” she says. “I like to have a sense of humour and take the piss out of things.”

Photo:
Dee Goldberg uses Instagram as her style journal. (Instagram: Deeegoldie)
Dee keeps a style journal on Instagram, where her following went from just a few to a few thousand overnight after fashion photographer and Advanced Style founder Ari Seth Cohen shared a photo of her Barbie shoe headband.”I told my daughter, there’s something wrong with my Instagram. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Dee Goldberg has made this piece out of chocolate wrappers. “I’ve found a voice in myself as I’ve gotten older,” she says. That’s an understatement. She said ‘you’ve gone viral mum’. “There is no such things as clashing colours,” she says.Her hundreds of outfit combinations are made out of recycled materials. “It was like a fire had been lit inside me. (Instagram: Deeegoldie)
So is Dee Goldberg the southern hemisphere’s most eclectic fashionista? Each one of them is likely to showcase every colour of the rainbow — and if you look closely, you’ll find everything from Lego blocks to lolly wrappers. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )
Dee isn’t interested in high-end labels. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )
While they may be mismatched, Dee’s outfits aren’t just thrown together. “My mind starts to swirl and it starts to move upside down, and what I try to tell people is I don’t look at things the same way,” she says.”So I can see pieces of paper, or a block and then I see it as a bag. And then I’ll see pipe cleaners at Lincraft and I’m already making it into a hat or an Alice band.”

Photo:
Melbourne woman Dee Goldberg is the resident fashionista at Chapel Street Bazaar. “This is not dress-ups, this is wearable art which takes a lot of time, energy, collecting, it’s expensive — each piece costs a lot of money by the time I’ve finished.” One of her latest outfits explores an imaginary story of Barbie going to Mars with NASA.”This is my fantasy of Barbie, Barbie being not the blonde bimbo but actually having a brain.”

Photo:
Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. “Nothing is out of bounds. You will die in the bum.”

Photo:
Dee Goldberg’s favourite outfit is her Chanel ball gown, made out of rip-off garments. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. “Well, I haven’t met anyone that is more eclectic than me,” she says.”But if there is, I’d love to meet them.” “Sorry Melbourne, I do not do black,” she says. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Dee Goldberg’s favourite outfit is her Chanel ball gown, made out of rip-off garments. Photo:
Melbourne woman Dee Goldberg has an eclectic passion for fashion. “I’d rather die than go into a designer store,” she says.”I take the piss out of Chanel.”Wait until you see the Chanel outfit. It was like every nerve in my body was alive. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Dee Goldberg says this outfit tells a story of Barbie going to space. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )
The 61-year-old, who was born into a conservative family in South Africa, only found her individual style when she was in her 40s after working in finance for 14 years.When it comes to clothes, her motto is “more is more”. But that’s not something she’s interested in. [poster]Dee Goldberg’s flamboyant garments may not have been paraded on the runway yet, but her unique passion for fashion has long been turning heads. She often spends years collecting bits and pieces, before taking them to her sewer to be added on. (ABC News: Margaret Burin )

Photo:
Dee Goldberg uses Instagram as her style journal. I thought, viral, I might need to go to the doctor.”She’s been invited to New York to be photographed and has fielded dozens of offers from fashion bloggers. I felt alive for the first time and I still feel the same way.”Since then, she’s been rampaging op shops, markets and the Chapel Street Bazaar where she works, and with the help of her sewing partner she turns unwanted goods into wearable art. However, a Chanel ball gown, made up of many different counterfeit garments, is her favourite of all the outfits she’s designed. You just wear it and you rock it.”

Video: Is this Australia's most eclectic fashionista?
Map:
Melbourne 3000