Noela Foxcroft proves age no barrier to getting big acting break

(936 ABC Hobart: Carol Rääbus) 936 ABC Hobart

By

Carol Rääbus

Posted

October 11, 2016 12:47:47

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Noela Foxcroft plays Mrs Marsh in the comedy series Rosehaven.
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Meet the team behind Rosehaven
She was then asked to audition for the role of the real estate receptionist and former babysitter of the main character in Rosehaven.Foxcroft said the cast and crew were great to work with, especially as she had never worked on a TV set like it before.”It’s like being in a foreign country where you don’t know the language and you don’t know the customs,” she said.”That film world is a world of its own and there’s a jargon and I was always wondering if I was going to be able to keep up with it.”It was out of this world. “To work alongside people with such an enormous talent as them is something you can just dream about.”Series one of Rosehaven premieres on Wednesday at 8:59pm on ABC. Celia and Luke were fantastic. it went Australia-wide and then it went worldwide,” she said.”The thing was, one of the local ladies wrote a play about it and that was produced by Mainstage Theatre and I had a role in it.”Foxcroft was spotted on stage by a local promoter and was soon signed up, going on to secure small jobs in TV and radio ads. Noela Foxcroft landed her first starring role in a TV series in her 80s, proving you are never too old for your 15 seconds of fame.”I got the word that I had the part [of Mrs Marsh in Rosehaven] and I had no idea really what it was about,” she told Louise Saunders on 936 ABC Hobart.Rosehaven is a new eight-part ABC TV comedy series set in Tasmania, written by Luke McGregor and Celia Pacquola.The show is set in a rural real estate agency and Foxcroft’s character is the agency’s receptionist.She said she had an interest in acting from a young age.”I went to drama school in my teens and then when we came to Hobart I did work both front of stage and back of stage with Repertory [Theatre Company].”I was quite involved, but I live in South Arm and when the bridge went down, getting into Hobart for rehearsals and performances was out of the question so I dropped right out.”The Tasman Bridge connecting Hobart’s eastern shore with the west collapsed in 1975.Nude calendar helped big breakIt was not until 2004 that Foxcroft found herself back in the acting world via a rather unusual path.”A group of elderly ladies in South Arm, they needed to raise some money for curtains for the hall and we produced a nude calendar … It was just amazing.
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Wilderness trek opens on SA’s Kangaroo Island

Power outages hit as storms sweep across SA
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The Kelly Hill Caves can be visited during the wilderness walk. and the Measday lookout off Old Mount Barker Road — this might be a chance for walkers to explore those.”

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The ocean view from Remarkable Rocks at the western end of the island. Tourism authorities hope a 66-kilometre walking trail which has just been opened on Kangaroo Island in South Australia will become a global drawcard.”Already we’re getting such great feedback from a few international walkers, as well as locals who wanted to be the first ones on it,” Environment Department chief executive Sandy Pitcher said.Walkers pass through bushland wilderness areas and get sweeping views of the Southern Ocean at times.The trail passes already-popular tourist sites including Remarkable Rocks, Admirals Arch and the Kelly Hill Caves.”Despite the stormy weather, we were able to send our first walkers down the Kangaroo Island wilderness trail,” Ms Pitcher said of this month’s unofficial opening.”The Premier and his family are on holidays and doing the walk at the moment.”Premier Jay Weatherill will formally launch the trail at a function on the island on Thursday.Authorities say the trek is best tackled over about five days. (Audience submitted: Bill Geyer)
Trails severely damaged in stormsThe Environment Department has been in the firing line in recent days after engineers determined an ongoing risk of landslides in the Waterfall Gully area of the Adelaide foothills after recent storms.A cafe, Utopia, was given just an hour’s notice it would have to close and its operator complained of mounting financial losses.”Engineers are still looking at the site and we’ve got drones up there to see what the potential impact could be,” Ms Pitcher explained.”The rocks that have fallen up there are right on the back of the Utopia.”She said there were at least 80 national parks-managed sites across South Australia where clean-up work would be needed after the severe storms.”Walking trails, bridges, boardwalks need repair,” she said.”Things are still pretty wet and unstable and there’s been some really big damage on the Mount Lofty trail.”Ms Pitcher said it would take some time yet to assess damage and fix the Mount Lofty climb, which is usually one of the busiest walks in the Adelaide region, and she urged keen walkers to investigate some of the lesser-known alternatives nearby.”The Cleland wildlife park has got the Hartford trail, Waterfall Gully has got Winter track and Long Ridge track … (Audience submitted: Lance Higgerson)
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October 12, 2016 14:43:17

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Walkers can enjoy spectacular ocean views from Kangaroo Island.
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Home-brewers finding career paths in Australia’s beer industry

Crafty change for beer tastes as small brewers grow lager by the day
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Drinkers are enjoying a wider choice of beers than ever.
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More home-brewers than ever are finding career paths in the beer industry alongside the professionals, an expert says.Home-brewers are gathering in Adelaide this week for one of Australia’s biggest beer conferences, which will also see brewers from around the world involved in discussion panels, tastings and beer-making sessions.Conference chief executive Andrew Davison said home-brewers were sometimes able to turn their hobby into a full-time career.”More than ever we are seeing home-brewers make that transition into professional brewing. The ingredients home-brewers have available to them are sometimes even more varied and higher quality than what the professional brewers themselves can get.”The changing industry was evident when drinkers checked the shelves at their local bottle shop, Mr Davison said.”You’ve just got to go down to the bottle shop and look at the range of beers available,” he said.”We used to have a selection of a small handful with very little to distinguish them, now you have a massive and complex array of different styles of beer available to the public.”The conference organisers said their event was aimed at encouraging even more people to develop their beer-making skills, and the keys to success were controlling the temperature of the brew and having plenty of patience. In Victoria alone we’ve had a massive rise in the number of craft breweries that have been founded by home-brewers,” he said.”Here in Adelaide it’s the same, there are a lot of home-brewers growing up to become professional brewers.”Mr Davison said the trend was giving beer lovers a much wider choice of brews.”The sort of beer your uncle used to make and put under the house and used to explode in bottles, it just doesn’t happen anymore,” he said.”There is a lot more information about how to brew properly.
Posted

October 12, 2016 12:36:47

Beach creche helps Queensland mums hit the surf

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Jacquie Mackay

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Alice Roberts

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October 12, 2016 15:00:04

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Surfing Mums’ Rachael Legrose takes three-year-old son Kona out for a paddle on the Capricorn Coast. (ABC Capricornia: Alice Roberts)
A group of mothers have combined playgroup with stand-up paddleboarding to increase fitness and health in a central Queensland coastal town. The group also has six surfing lessons with a local surf school.”The Government has allowed us to subsidise those lessons because the … (ABC Capricornia: Alice Roberts)
“I sell stand-up paddleboards and I haven’t sold any for a month or two, and I’ve sold three over the weekend.”The weather warms up and people just want to get out on the water.”Beth Stewart recently moved to central Queensland from Cairns and said the group gave her a rare opportunity to head out with her four-month-old daughter Isabella for a bit of a workout.”I thought it was great opportunity to get out to the beach, without having to have my husband hitching along to look after a baby,” she said.”I love the water and to be able to get out and about with some other mums is pretty awesome.” Photo:
Surfing Mums’ Rachael and Kona Legrose take a break after a paddle at Yeppoon Main Beach. Photo:
Surfing Mums’ Beth Stewart and four-month-old Isabella attend their first paddleboarding lesson. “It gives mums, who are often doing it tough — you know staying at home and looking after the kids — it gives them an opportunity to get out on the water while someone else looks after their kids,” he said.”How good is that? “We’ve bought two learn to paddle boards that are quite good beginner boards — they’re quite nice and wide,” Dr Hodgetts said. thing with mums is that money is a little bit tight because quite often you’re working part-time or not at all.”

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Capricorn Learn to Surf operator Pat Eastwood teaches mums how to paddleboard. (ABC Capricornia: Alice Roberts)
Capricorn Coast Learn to Surf operator Pat Eastwood became the Australian Stand-Up Paddleboard Champion for his age group last month and is lending his skills to teach the mums the art of paddleboarding. (ABC Capricornia: Alice Roberts)
“You come to the beach once a week and you partner up with another mum — one mum watches your kids and theirs while you go out and have a paddle, and then you go back in and swap over and they get a paddle as well.”The other thing I’ve found, which I hadn’t really thought about, is the kids have a really great time as well.” As a research fellow at CQ University studying sport, Dr Hodgetts said the meets were also a vital way for mothers to get fit.”Our physical activity guidelines say that we need to do five lots of 30 minutes of exercise a week, plus two lots of strength and conditioning,” she said.”As a mum, that is incredibly hard to try and find the time to carve out those on your own.”It’s really good for your balance … You can actually get one back on the hubbies.” He said the sport’s popularity continues to increase.”A couple of years ago, it was the fastest growing sport in the world and it really has seen incredibly growth,” he said. and it’s also really good for your core muscles.”As mums that area tends to go a little bit, so being able to do the paddling can really help that.”As the weather warms, mums head to the oceanThe group recently secured funding from the Queensland Government as part of a program to increase Queenslanders’ participation in sport. The not-for-profit organisation Surfing Mums Australia has groups across the country that provide the opportunity for mothers to surf while their children are cared for.SMA secretary Dr Danya Hodgetts said the Yeppoon Main Beach in central Queensland does not always cater to surfers, so the local group has had to adapt.”Because there’s not really great waves, we’re doing stand-up paddleboarding,” she said.
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Far west NSW communities welcome releases into Lake Menindee

ABC Broken Hill

By Cherie von Hörchner, Andrew Schmidt and Declan Gooch

Updated

October 13, 2016 10:58:42

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Menindee local Barry Stone visited Lake Menindee to watch the first releases of water into the lake in more than two years. (ABC Rural: Cherie von Hörchner)
Water is flowing into one of the largest lakes in far west New South Wales for the first time in more than two years.Authorities have opened the gates into Lake Menindee, allowing hundreds of gigalitres of water into the formerly dry storage.The move has special significance for the communities of Menindee and Sunset Strip, which have suffered serious economic downturns since the Menindee Lakes system mostly dried up.”I think a long-awaited milestone, as far as water security in the region, has been reached, and I think that’s a real high point for the local community and everybody involved,” WaterNSW spokesman Tony Webber said.Lake Menindee is part of the system that supplies Broken Hill with drinking water, and is connected to the Darling River.Flooding and heavy rain elsewhere in the Murray-Darling Basin have filled adjoining lakes Wetherell and Pamamaroo, forcing authorities to start releases into Lake Menindee. “So this has probably saved a few of those that have hung in there.”

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Water is released into Lake Menindee in October 2016 for the first time in more than two years. (ABC Rural: Cherie von Hörchner)
The drying out of the Menindee Lakes made life difficult for many local business owners, hit by a drop in tourism both from nearby Broken Hill and outside the far west.Ross Leddra owns a property at Sunset Strip, which overlooks the lake, and runs a small freight business.”Those people from motels, hotels, the corner deli, the supermarket, the whole caravan parks, the whole lot, they’ve basically stopped earning,” he said.”Geez, they couldn’t go any lower. It’ll be nice.” (Supplied: Kerry Turley)
There was hope the return of water to the largest storage in the Menindee Lakes would breathe new life into Sunset Strip.”You want life, add water, and that’s what we’re doing now.”Once this lake’s full again it’ll be full-on again,” local Barry Stone said.”People will be coming back, the tourists will be around, and the community will survive.”He said authorities do not recognise the significance of the lakes to local communities, and was concerned demand for water downstream will see a repeat of releases from the system in past years.”It’s a storage dam, yes, so they’re calling it, [but] it’s actually our livelihood.”Let’s keep it here a little bit longer, let’s change the cycle a little bit and give everybody the chance to use the water.”Mr Stone predicted Lake Menindee would be full by the end of the year.”First thing is, polish my boat and get it ready, just in time for Christmas. And try and get some yabbies out of here, for Christmas dinner. I think authorities are pretty confident we’ve reached that point,” he said.”That’s really come on the back of a tremendous turn around in the water security prospects, not only in the far west but also in the central regions of the state.”WaterNSW said more than 500 gigalitres had flowed into the system, with a further 600 to 700 gigalitres expected to reach the lakes in coming weeks and months.Flows come just in time

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The community of Sunset Strip has been hit hard by the drying up of Lake Menindee. Photo:
The releases attracted dozens of onlookers from Menindee and elsewhere. (ABC Rural: Cherie von Hörchner)
“Those numbers have been done, and the theory is there’s certainly going to be sufficient water there to start stocking [Lake Menindee],” Mr Webber said.”The lakes need to be operated with a minimum of two years supply to Broken Hill.
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Menindee locals welcome move to re-open lake
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No, enjoying a G&T doesn’t mean you’re a psychopath

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The Conversation

By Megan Willis, Australian Catholic University

Posted

October 13, 2016 07:03:53

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Handle with care: a gin and tonic served as ‘holy water’ at the Brisbane Festival. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
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G and T: Gin and Tasmania a match made in distiller's heaven

A search for the word “gin” in the research paper that prompted this news story produced a grand total of zero hits.It’s therefore rather concerning that this paper has spawned a huge number of popular articles all reporting this non-existent link, such as this one that has been shared on Facebook nearly 300,000 times.Depending on what you read, if you’re partial to a gin and tonic you are either a psychopath, or slightly more generously, a possible psychopath. The short story is, it hasn’t.I determined this reasonably efficiently. I was looking at Facebook one evening last week when my attention was captured by the headline “Gin lovers are all massive psychopaths, according to experts” — a somewhat disconcerting thing to read as I sipped the gin and tonic I had in my hand at the time.As someone whose propensity to empathise with others has seen me spend entire evenings crying over the plight of movie characters, psychopathy has never made its way onto my list of self-diagnoses.I instantly felt compelled to learn more about how a penchant for gin had become the new diagnostic tool to detect a psychopath.
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Quite simply, they don’t.The study provided no evidence that an individual’s preference for specific bitter drinks like coffee, beer or tonic water (with or without gin), has any relationship with psychopathy. Even if it had, this would fall a long way short of being able to brand anyone who enjoys a G and T as a psychopath.The only thing this study found was a weak positive relationship between psychopathy and a general penchant for bitter things. Other stories have cast the net a bit wider, branding coffee and beer drinkers as potential psychopaths too — which, if you think about it, would make society a pretty scary place.Booze newsThese news stories are misreported accounts of research from the University of Innsbruck. Responses were then averaged to create a score for psychopathy and the other traits.The researchers measured bitter taste preferences in two ways. (ABC: Lisa Millar)
The researchers measured psychopathy using a brief personality measure that assesses three socially undesirable personality traits: psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism — collectively known as the “dark triad”.Participants indicated their agreement with statements such as “I tend to be callous or insensitive” and “I tend to lack remorse”. First, participants were provided with a list of 10 bitter foods and drinks, including coffee, tonic water, beer, radishes and celery, and rated them on a scale from 1 (dislike strongly) to 6 (like strongly). Photo:
Jekyll or Hyde? Across two studies, researchers investigated the relationship between bitter taste preferences and various antisocial personality traits, including psychopathy.While many tend to think of it as a disorder that afflicts only the most calculating of criminals, psychopathy is also conceptualised as a personality trait that falls along a continuum, with those at the extreme end characterised by superficial charm, callousness, and a lack of empathy. (ABC News)
How on earth do these findings translate to people who drink gin, coffee or beer being probable psychopaths? That is, those with higher psychopathy scores did not display stronger overall liking for the specific bitter foods and drinks, including tonic water, coffee, and beer.However, there was a weak correlation between psychopathy scores and participants’ scores on their general preference for bitter tastes. No, Tasmanian distiller Bill Lark, sipping a small glass of his gin. These scores were then averaged to create an overall measure of bitter taste preferences for each person. The researchers also asked participants to rate their liking for bitter foods and drinks in general (as opposed to the specific examples) on the same scale.The bitter truthThe results reported no significant relationship between psychopathy scores and participants’ preference scores for the specific bitter foods and drinks. So you might say that people at the psychopathic end of the spectrum are slightly more likely to express a preference for eating or drinking bitter things in general. Photo:
Distillery owner Max Chater explains the joys of gin on the London Gin Trail. In my view, this link is negligible compared with other, more well established predictors of psychopathy, such as a person’s genes or sex.If you want to know if you’re talking to a psychopath, the truth is that most will reveal themselves soon enough, especially if you know the tell tale signs — which don’t include whether or not they’re brandishing an aperitif.Megan Willis is a senior lecturer in the School of Psychology at Australian Catholic University.Originally published in The Conversation.

Losing hair but finding solace with a free wig

A free wig and turban service is brightening the faces of women undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Louise Campbell, aged 50, had experienced a wide-range of side effects from chemotherapy, but one of the most confronting side effects from her treatment was losing her hair.
(ABC North Queensland: Sophie Kesteven ) ABC North Qld

By

Sophie Kesteven

Posted

October 13, 2016 10:55:28

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Louise Campbell and Rhyl Graham have been making the most of the wig and turban service.
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Following her diagnosis three months ago, Ms Campbell began chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer in Townsville, north Queensland. (ABC North Queensland: Sophie Kesteven )
“They show you how to play around with makeup, because you can lose your eyebrows and eyelashes as well,” she said. “Coming into the Wig and Turban Service, they’ll come in and they’ve woken up that morning and their hair is on their pillow; they are pretty devastated,” Ms Graham said. “We then go to the colour and we offer them a catalogue to browse through; sometimes they say ‘I like that’, even though it’s a completely different colour,” she said. “I had shoulder length hair and I wanted a bit of control of how I lost my hair,” Ms Campbell said.”First off I got a short style cut, and then when it started to thin out a little bit my partner — we wanted to play around a bit — so I got a Mohawk.”Then when it really started to come out in chunks he gave me a number two.”Since taking part in a Look Good, Feel Better Day at the Cancer Council — a workshop that brings cancer patients together experiencing the same side effects — Ms Campbell now has a blonde bob on loan, which looks similar her former hair. (ABC North Queensland: Sophie Kesteven )
Rhyl Graham has been making turbans for women with cancer for the past 17 years.She became a volunteer with the Cancer Council ESA Wig and Turban service when it began more than three years ago.During that time she has also learnt how to create vibrant designs. “It made a huge difference to how I felt.”One of the most difficult parts of breast cancer, especially if you have a mastectomy and going through chemo, is losing a breast and losing your hair.”It’s part of your femininity [and] being a woman.”So knowing that you can come and get a free wig and bring it back, change it, that does mean a lot to your self-esteem.” The art of crafting a turban

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According to the Cancer Council, more than 200 wigs and turbans were used by cancer patients in north Queensland in 2015. Ms Campbell said she became aware of the Cancer Council ESA Wig and Turban Service after a breast care nurse mentioned it to her during treatment one day. “We might put a bright red one on the client and they might take photos, and it becomes a game, and the reward of doing it is that when they walk out of here they are on a high.”Ms Graham said the high might only last until their next session, but being able to get their spirits up is a rewarding experience. But we do like to see someone really get a kick out of having something different.”As part of her volunteer work, Ms Graham would come into the Townsville Cancer Council most Fridays to help women choose the right wig or turban for them. “We can tizzy up a turban with few diamantes, or scarves, or flowers, or anything,” Ms Graham said.”You’ll get the ladies who like the bright colours you also get other people who are a bit more conservative and like the plain reds, blacks. Photo:
The free ESA Wig and Turban Service has been running in Townsville for the past three and a half years.

Which Aussie landmarks should be on the Monopoly board?

666 ABC Canberra

By

Penny Travers

Posted

October 13, 2016 11:28:00
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ACT Monopoly champion Gerry Abideen competing at the national championships in 2015. The nominations for the next Australian edition include:ACT: Lake Burley Griffin, Canberra, Australian War Memorial, Floriade, QuestaconNew South Wales: Sydney Harbour, Byron Bay, Orange, Coffs Harbour, Lord Howe IslandVictoria: Melbourne, Great Ocean Road, Yarra Valley, Phillip Island, Mornington PeninsulaQueensland: Brisbane, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Whitsundays, tropical North QueenslandSouth Australia: Hahndorf, Flinders Ranges, Port Lincoln, Barossa Valley, Kangaroo IslandWestern Australia: Perth, Margaret River, Broome, Exmouth, EsperanceTasmania: Evandale, Freycinet, Hobart, Stanley, StrahanNorthern Territory: Uluru, Kakadu National Park, Arnhem Land, Darwin, West MacDonnell National ParkCast your vote on the Monopoly Australia website from November 1 to 22. “It’s tangible; you’re able to sit there with an opponent and interact with them, rather than sitting at a computer and staring at a screen.”With Monopoly you can see their reactions and sometimes it can be quite hilarious.”Is there a winning strategy?Everyone seems to have their own strategy when it comes to conquering the board, but Mr Abideen recommended “buying up big nice and early”.”Everyone tries to snap up all the orange ones, they’re the most popular places to land on the board,” he said. Nostalgia is part of the game’s appeal — it has been around for more than 80 years and many Australians have grown up playing it with family and friends. Photo:
Lauren Ingram’s home-made Canberra-edition of Monopoly: ‘Canberra-opoly’. “It’s a nice family game — as long as you’re not too competitive,” ACT Monopoly champion Gerry Abideen said.Players move around the board buying or trading properties, developing their sites with houses and hotels and collecting rent from their opponents. (Supplied: Alvaro Ojeda)
The aim of the game is to drive all other players into bankruptcy and leave one monopolist in control of the board’s economy. to maximise your returns.” At the end of the day, however, luck has a lot to do with it.”You can’t control where you land on the board,” Mr Abideen said.”The way the dice falls, you could end up anywhere and lose a lot — but if you have a lot to lose then that’s OK.”Have your sayWhile Monopoly originated in the United States in 1903, the current commercial version was first sold in 1935.Since then it has been locally licensed in more than 100 countries and printed in dozens of languages. “It’s a very strategic game, there’s a lot of thinking involved,” Mr Abideen said. Monopoly has been a household favourite for decades, and despite the attraction of electronic games it seems the roll of the dice still has pulling power. (Supplied: Lauren Ingram)
There are hundreds of versions and editions linked to cities and popular culture around the world. The Australian edition of the board game is being revamped and fans have been invited to vote for their favourite places.Forty destinations from each state and territory have been shortlisted but only 22 properties will make it onto the board.Fun for the whole family?But what makes Monopoly the world’s most popular board game? “I just try to buy everything — the more you have the more you can trade with and you sort of get yourself in a better position.”I prefer the light blues and the purples and build up the lower end of the board …
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Monopoly fans can vote for the places they want to see on the new Australia edition. (Supplied: Stuart Faunt)

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Wrestling fan’s dream comes true after thieves steal child’s beloved figurines

A far north Queensland family have received an outpouring of kindness after their disabled son’s wrestling figurines were stolen from his backyard cubby house last month.Jesse Fullerton, 11, has Down syndrome and struggled to understand why someone would steal his beloved figurines when he discovered they were missing.”For the few days afterwards he kept going out to the backyard and asking us when the bad people were going to bring his toys back,” said his mother, Amanda Fullerton.”It was very hard for him to comprehend that they were gone and that they weren’t coming back,” she said.”He doesn’t comprehend that people steal, that’s not in his nature.”Before the theft of his collection, Jesse had more than 80 wrestling figurines, including a 1-metre tall figurine of his favourite wrestler, John Cena.”[Jesse] used to actually physically wrestle with that one himself,” Ms Fullerton said.”That was the worst thing to lose because now when Jesse goes outside he wants to wrestle with us.”
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Jesse's presentation
‘More good people than bad’When Queensland Police heard about the theft officers at Jesse’s local station did more than just investigate the crime.They made contact with toy manufacturer Mattel and the Australian arm of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) to see if they could help.”Through some negotiations, Mattel and the WWE have helped Jesse out to make it right, and supplied some new figurines and even some tickets to an event on the Gold Coast,” Sergeant Michael McGarry said.”That goes some way in trying to show Jesse that there are more good people out there than there are bad people,” he said.Community members have also rallied around Jesse, donating unused wrestling toys to him in the wake of the theft. (ABC Far North: Mark Rigby)
“He gets excited about opening things, but I don’t think he understands where they’re all coming from,” Ms Fullerton said.”It’s up to us as his family to keep telling him, and the one thing we have been telling him is that there’s more good people than bad people around.”I think he’s starting to understand that a bit more.”Silver lining to a thoughtless crimeSergeant McGarry said although police were attuned to dealing with heinous acts, crimes like this were often the most heartbreaking.”When you’ve got a victim of crime like young Jesse … it puts a bit of a ripple through the police,” he said.”Fortunately we have been able to right it a little bit for him, but it doesn’t take away that feeling of someone coming into his yard and taking his toys.”Until we identify that person there’s a little bit of a knot still there that we really wish we could untie.”While the family is still unsettled by the thought of someone stealing Jesse’s toys, today’s outcome has “restored our faith in humanity”.”It’s overwhelmed us that all these people have done all these things helped us to replace them,” Ms Fullerton said.”We never would have been able to replace them on our own, it would have cost us a fortune and taken forever.”As a family we found it a little bit hard to accept all these donations, but somebody said we have to do it so Jesse understands there are good people out there that want to help.”

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Jesse Fullerton thanked Edmonton police sergeant Michael McGarry for helping organise replacements for his stolen wrestling figurines. Photo:
Jesse has had a mixture of new and used figurines donated to him, as well as a family pass to a live wrestling event on the Gold Coast in December. (ABC Far North: Mark Rigby)
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ABC Far North

By

Mark Rigby

Posted

October 13, 2016 15:48:29

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Jesse Fullerton was all smiles when he received a parcel full of wrestling figurines. (ABC Far North: Mark Rigby)

Remote animal rescue group saves 151 dogs from death row

She has since reopened it to temporarily house the dogs. Ms Josephson used to own a dog boarding businesses but closed it when she started a family. Each animal has fundraising page established and once it reaches enough money to transport it to bigger towns, the group send it to an adoption centre.The group also hopes to change people’s attitudes about getting rid of animals that are not good at their job by starting the program.Ms Josephson said the district had a problem with pigging dogs being abandoned on properties if they got injured or did not perform well. She said euthanasia rates at the Cobar and Bourke pounds had also dropped by more than 90 per cent since the group was set up. Feeling down? “In Bourke for instance, there was a lot of dogs roaming the streets,” Ms Josephson said.”This was reported from Phil the ranger, and since we started and the word got out that those dogs are going to be picked up and taken out of town and rehomed.”Phil said there is barely a dog walking the street,” she said.Rural dogs being dumpedThe group has an agreement with the Cobar and Bourke Shire Councils, where all the impounded dogs are picked up or delivered to the ROAR site in Cobar rather than being put down.It is run by Ms Josephson and two other women who also deliver the town’s mail. “If a dog is not a good pigger they get dumped in the bush.””They [dogs] can end up on people’s properties, they can be shot, they can destroy sheep, die a very poor death, starvation in the heat.” An animal rescue program unique to the western region has been responsible for a vast drop in dog euthanasia rates in two remote western New South Wales communities.The volunteer-run Rural Outback Animal Rescue (ROAR) based at Cobar was set up to address high numbers of dogs being impounded.The co-founder Leah Josephson said the group had so far helped re-home 151 animals and it has had dogs from across the west, including Bourke and Broken Hill.She said it had proven to be a big help to residents and farmers. There are always dogs Dogs have a particular kindness, gentleness and intuition when it comes to understanding their human friends, writes Deidre Fidge.

Man's best friend may be a result of genetics
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The diverse street dogs of the APY Lands
ABC Western Plains

By Kathleen Ferguson

Posted

October 13, 2016 16:13:07

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Leah Josephson, Wizzy Knezevic & Casey Vidot with rescued dog Sweetpea (The Cobar Weekly)

Boy buys a pony with money saved from lemonade stand

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Scarborough 4020
(612 ABC Brisbane: Terri Begley) 612 ABC Brisbane

By Terri Begley and Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

October 14, 2016 12:19:30

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It took three years but Sabastian got his pony, Tom.
(Facebook: Juliana Kent)
Sabastian’s lemonade was made the traditional way, with lemon and sugar, and became so popular that he would regularly sell out.”I was selling the lemonade for 20 cents a cup and I saved up for nearly three years.”He said when he first laid eyes on his new pony Tom this week he was over the moon.”I was so happy as he was so big and I wasn’t expecting a big pony.”I felt really happy because a pony was here.”I saved nearly $3,000 to buy Tom.”I’ve ridden him nearly 10 times in five days.”
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Buying a new pony
Sabastian’s mother Juliana Kent said he was always dedicated to make the money needed.”For three years he kept putting money in a jar and kept praying to the pony gods … we had to embrace it.”She said she found the 13-year-old schoolmaster pony earlier this month and knew immediately he would be perfect.”Last night Sabastian fell asleep on him after an hour of patting him.”The family have since moved from a suburban block to acreage to embrace their new four-legged addition, and Sabastian and Tom will train at the Cedar Lake Equestrian Centre near the Gold Coast.”I’m still learning but I can trot and walk as they’re easy but cantering is hard,” Sabastian said.He now plans to save money for a new saddle and health care for Tom.”I’ll get back to making lemonade to pay for that,” Sabastian said. A seven-year-old budding entrepreneur’s dream of owning a pony has come true after three years’ hard work.Sabastian Lucas from Scarborough, north of Brisbane, set up a business selling lemonade out the front of his family’s home to raise the funds needed to buy his new pet. Photo:
Sabastian sold lemonade and iced teas from the front of his parents’ house.

Muslim women get on their bikes to ‘eliminate fear’

(702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
The Sydney Cycling Sisters are a group of Muslim women who gather for weekly riding sessions.On Sunday, more than a dozen Cycling Sisters will get on their bikes for their second Spring Cycle race from North Sydney to Homebush.Their message?”Muslim women are the same as any other women,” Ms Rahal said.Challenging ‘negative rhetoric’The occupational therapist and mother of four said the “negative Islamic rhetoric” in the past decade following terrorist attacks had scared a lot of people in the Muslim community.”You watched TV and saw Tony Abbott saying: ‘You’ve got to be on Team Australia’,” Ms Rahal said.”What does that mean? A few years ago Cindy Rahal was sitting in a shopping centre with her sister and a friend when a man approached her yelling: “There are so many f***ing Muslims around.”He threatened her with a crowbar before leaving and causing damage elsewhere in the centre.”He basically stood over me … and said, ‘have you ever seen a crowbar’ in a really menacing way,” Ms Rahal recalled.”It was a Thursday night — I thought I was safe.”The intimidation was very real, very scary.”This incident, as well as other verbal and physical confrontations experienced by her friends, prompted Ms Rahal to start a cycling group. It means there’s going to be some people who are not going to be included on this team. (702 ABC Sydney: Amanda Hoh)
“Even though it’s a very small minority that do it, it’s enough to scare women.”I found that a lot of women stopped doing things for leisure, like going out and riding a bike.”Muslims are tired of saying this is not our religion. Photo:
Eaman Badaui from Canley Vale says she loves keeping fit and enjoys meeting women from “all walks of life”. External Link:

Sydney Cycling Sisters Facebook
“We’re saying we’re Muslim women and we’re free, we’re going to ride our bikes and we’re not going to assimilate the way you want us to assimilate.”We’re going to assimilate the way we want to with our hijabs on, while wearing modest clothes and observing our faith, because that’s important to us.”It doesn’t make us bad people and it doesn’t make us terrorists, it makes us people who enjoy life who don’t want to be criticised for what we wear.”Ms Rahal said she hoped more women of all fitness levels and ethnic and religious background would join the Cycling Sisters. Photo:
Cindy Rahal says the cycling group has given the women confidence. We are frustrated with not being heard.”It was a sentiment she put to Pauline Hanson during the ABC’s Q&A program and accused the senator of proliferating fear about Muslims.”With this cycling group, we’re trying to eliminate some of that fear,” Ms Rahal said.
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Tackling for the sisterhood in Aboriginal women's rugby
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Amanda Hoh

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October 14, 2016 13:33:55

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Sydney Cycling Sisters is a group made up of Muslim women from across Sydney.

Whale helps calf caught in Gold Coast shark net

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Coolangatta 4225
A juvenile whale calf has been cut free after becoming entangled in a shark net off the Gold Coast.The four-metre humpback was trapped by its tail at Coolangatta Beach.Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol spokesman Mark Saul said conditions were calm, so too was the calf’s mother, which sped up the rescue.”Both the whales were very calm,” he said.”Mum had just pushed into the nets slightly to help keep the calf up on the surface which she was doing quite well.”After a few cuts, a bit of mesh away, they both just swam away to the south-east.”It swam away with its mother to the south, in good health and condition.”
By Matt Watson

Updated

October 15, 2016 18:18:56

Video: Juvenile humpback whale freed from shark nets off Gold Coast

(ABC News)

White rhino freed from tyre stuck around its horn

According to Aware Trust, the muscles a rhino uses to open its mouth are much weaker than those used to close it.In order to free the animal safely, the vets were forced to use a tranquiliser dart.”We found Mark, the dominant bull, lying close to his girlfriends, looking decidedly dejected and exhausted from his ordeal on this scorching hot day,” Aware Trust Zimbabwe said in a Facebook post.”Fortunately the tyre came off in a few minutes with man power, and we did not have to resort to cutting through it.”Eleven minutes later he was antidoted (sic) and grazing again as if nothing had happened.” Vets from Aware Trust Zimbabwe have rescued a white rhino after it trapped its snout in a washed-up car tyre.The rhino, a dominant bull named Mark, was unable to eat or drink with the tyre trapped around its snout.Park rangers called vets after the rhino was unable to free itself.The vets from Aware Trust, Keith and Lisa, travelled one-and-a-half hours to get to Mark. The lake near where the rhino was grazing is known for being polluted and its banks are regularly littered with nets and tyres.
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WA man helps to save rhinos in South Africa
Updated

October 18, 2016 08:33:15

Video: Park rangers remove stuck tyre from rhino's snout

(ABC News)

Local paper plane championships off to a flyer

it was like a rainbow when we saw all the paper planes went into the air,” Mr Adler said.”You looked around and there was such a great buzz and vibe seeing all the kids happy.”They were connecting with their dads, helping fold the planes, and there wasn’t an iPad in sight.”The longest throw was recorded by local Haden Spencer with 34 metres.The current world record is 69 metres, held by Joe Ayoob and aircraft designer John Collins from the US.”Haden’s plane was an extreme dart which means the wings were folded in on itself,” Mr Adler told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Steve Austin.”His brute force and minimal wind resistance gave him the ability to throw it like a javelin … External Link:

The Australian movie Paper Planes inspired the Brisbane family to start their own competition. Photo:
Each competitor makes their own plane to use in the competition. I’m just the wingman.”
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Paper plane competition
The family raised more than $1,000 for local charities, including the RSPCA and the AEIOU Foundation.Next year they hope to make the event bigger and invite one of the actors from the film to come and be part of it.”We also want the Scouts or other mums and dads to come and help out,” Mr Adler said.”We want it to become a perpetual community event that is held year in and year out.” it was a big effort.”A family affairMr Adler said the film Paper Planes, which follows a young boy from Western Australia who dreams of competing in the World Paper Plane Championships, motivated him and his two sons to start a local competition. (Facebook: Up Up Upper Mt Gravatt Paper Plane Championships)
“When we saw the movie it connected with us and I wanted to teach my boys how to build something from nothing,” he said.”Laptops and iPads make children disconnected from the community and I wanted to change that.”I thought if I could teach them how to start an inaugural paper plane competition, how cool would that be?”Mr Adler said the competition had taught his sons life-changing skills.”I loved seeing my eight-year-old make a float for the sausage sizzle and he counted the money perfectly.”My youngest son is the managing director of the event and my nine-year-old is the creative director. “It was exciting to see all the different colour paper … A father inspired by a recent Australian film release has held a paper plane competition in Brisbane to encourage children to put down their laptops and connect.Dan Adler and his sons organised the Up Up Upper Mt Gravatt Paper Plane Championships held at the weekend.More than 150 children competed in the longest distance, hang time and expression session events.
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612 ABC Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Posted

October 17, 2016 14:21:39

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More than 150 children lined up with their handmade paper planes in Brisbane. (Facebook: Up Up Upper Mt Gravatt Paper Plane Championships)