Dolphin pods play in Port Adelaide harbour

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(Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary: Cristina Vicente) 891 ABC Adelaide

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Brett Williamson

Updated

August 17, 2016 12:06:49

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Large numbers of dolphins are flocking to inner Port Adelaide for a winter break.

Visitors to Port Adelaide have been treated to a sea spectacular with up to 60 dolphins spotted frolicking just off the docks in recent weeks.Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary volunteers and park rangers first noticed what was thought to be a concentration of animals in the area last year.A recent count confirmed the dolphins returned for the winter months this year. Photo:
Cristina Vicente keeps an eye out for dolphins at Port Adelaide. External Link:

Tweet: Dolphin tail walks in front of boat
“It seems like during winter they move more into the inner port,” sanctuary senior conservation officer Cristina Vicente said.Ms Vicente said the dolphins were grouping in the beach shallows between the Diver Derrick and Birkenhead bridges and near the Hart’s Mill corner.She said they were not sure why the dolphins gathered in this particular area, but it made for quite a special experience for visitors.”There are a few theories but we need to know a bit more about how the fish move and the water temperatures,” Ms Vicente said.Rare experience for researchersMs Vicente said it was extremely rare for wild pods of dolphins to gather in such a built-up area.”I think this is unique worldwide.”I don’t know of any other place in the world where you have such easy access to see wild dolphins.”Local researchers can stand on nearby jetties to observe the pods behaviours; an experience that would normally be difficult to manage. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
“Researchers in other parts of the world have to embark on a vessel for up to eight hours to be able to witness things like resting, feeding, mating and mums feeding their calves,” Ms Vicente said.”Here you can just walk around the edges of the waters and witness this amazing behaviour.”Dolphins in the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary, which covers an 118-square-kilometre area just off the coast, are primarily the Indo-Pacific bottlenose species.
Man-made island results in booming crèche for pelicans
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Gulf St Vincent a 'supermarket' for migratory birds on 40,000km trip
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Aussie photographer’s punt pays off with viral Bolt snap

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(Cameron Spencer: Getty Images) The photo of Usain Bolt shared around the world. 612 ABC Brisbane

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Jessica Hinchliffe

Updated

August 17, 2016 14:01:26

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Winners are grinners …
I wanted to get a nice shot of him in action and it wasn’t until I looked at the back of my camera when I realised he was smiling.”As a photographer you want to try and do something different and I took the punt and it worked out.”‘I was lucky the result was what it was’Spencer said he could tell Bolt stopped to enjoy the last 20 metres knowing he had the race won.”I think he was smiling at the other guys in the race but it happened to be in my direction,” he said.”The cheeky grin is such a reflection of his personality as he’s such a larger-than-life character and an entertainer who loves to show off to the crowd.”Getty Images had 11 photographers covering the race, which allowed Spencer to take a risk by shooting a slower image.”The chief photo manager told me there was 600 photographers at the 100 metres that evening; there were many lenses pointing at him,” he said. who knows, someone might take a better picture tonight.”I’m going to enjoy the feedback I’m getting at the moment while people are liking what they’re seeing.” that would be nice for the pool room.”Everyone loves shooting Bolt as he’s a rock star of the Olympics and I think anytime you get a picture like that it’s pretty awesome.”Rio is Spencer’s fifth Olympics, having covered three summer and two winter games during his career.”There’s world interest in Olympics,” he said.”I say to people that it’s the hardest I ever work, but I have four years to recover from it.”The reward is always getting the great imagery and I think everyone is on an adrenalin rush when we’re here.”I think people will continue to see it on websites, publications, magazines and things like that … External Link:

Cameron Spencer tweets Bolt photo
“I was lucky the result was what it was as I had only had minutes to prepare.”Photo to go straight to the pool roomThe image has since been shared around the world on social media and has been seen by Bolt.”I’ve heard he’s seen it and he likes it,” Spencer said.”We’re trying to get him a print and get one signed for him and one for myself … The Aussie photographer who took the now viral image of Usain Bolt smiling during his 100m semi-final at the Olympic Games admits he “took a punt and it worked”.Getty Images photographer Cameron Spencer is the man behind the image, which many sport commentators have said was one of the greatest moments captured in Rio.Spencer was shooting the high jump when he decided to run across the field and capture the Jamaican sprinter’s semi-final.”Fortunately Bolt was running in the second semi and I decided to shoot a slow pan shot of him running past,” he told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Terri Begley.”I stopped on the 70 metre line and waited for him to come by; no-one expected him to slow down and give a big smile to my direction.”I couldn’t believe it.
Bolt eyes 200m world record in race to immortality

Cattle breeder turned yogi helping farmers relax

A Big Country: Limbering up for tractor yoga

(ABC Rural)
Military veterans turn to yoga to ease PTSD
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(ABC Rural: Peta Doherty) (ABC Rural: Peta Doherty)
He said yoga had increased his strength and flexibility and had brought back a sense of balance he had not realised was lost.”After a couple of weeks, I was feeling better all over,” he told the group, gathered to talk about cross-breeding.The new-found serenity is what hooked him.”Yoga is about union of breath and body,” Mr Wills said.Asked by one farmer if yoga had allowed him to work more effectively with his animals he said: “My whole outlook has changed [and] I feel I’m able to settle my mind better.”There is a lot of time to think during six, or eight hours or longer on a tractor.”You think about what you did in the past, what you want to do in the future, you think about about your family, your kids, and ‘why aren’t I playing with my granddaughter’, which would better than any of this,” he said.”But it’s one of those things — you’re in the tractor and you’ve got to make the best of it.”A bit of yoga and taking a bit of time out when you’re filling up the seeder — just to do a Shavasana where you rest and release everything,” he said.”Surely I’ve got five minutes to do that.”

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Yoga poses can be done during long hours spent in the tractor cab. (ABC Rural: Peta Doherty)
Mr Wills has now begun the challenging task of introducing yoga to his fellow farmers.But not just any yoga — tractor yoga.”Tractor yoga is my take on making it somewhat user-friendly,” he told a gathering of cattle farmers at an on-farm field day.After returning from a 200-hour yoga teaching course in Cambodia, Mr Wills adapted a series of exercises for farmers to do in their tractor cabs, to help keep them physically fit and mentally alert and focused. Photo:
Demonstrating some tractor-friendly yoga poses. “There was something else in yoga that I couldn’t quite explain,” the farmer from Greenethorpe in the NSW central west said.”It managed to address my stresses and anxieties and that’s what motivated me to learn more.”

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Cattle breeder Chris Wills demonstrates the Lion Pose.
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Embracing the F-word at Fat Yoga
Before Chris Wills took up yoga he thought the practice was something “people who lived in caves in India did”.But it was not long before the third generation cattle and sheep farmer realised the class he was “dragged to kicking and screaming” was helping far more than his bad back.

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Peta Doherty

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August 18, 2016 12:02:09

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Farmer and yoga teacher Chris Wills warms up before a session on the tractor. (ABC Rural: Peta Doherty)

North Queensland family finds missing cat after three years

Missing cat reunites with owner, five years on
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“My daughter spotted a photo on a Facebook page that the pound had uploaded,” she said. “She sent it to me saying ‘do you think it could possibly be Marbles?’

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Ms Johnson says she received dozens of comments from people hopeful they might one day find their cat on social media too. However, her family was given renewed hope recently when a familiar cat was caught by the pound a couple of streets away from her home earlier this month. “When I advertised him as lost on a Facebook page originally some man commented back saying ‘please help this lady she has lost her marbles’,” Ms Johnson said. “He was rotten; he was matted down to the skin and he stunk like anything,” she recalled. The cat has now been micro-chipped and registered with the council.”So if he ever goes missing again hopefully it won’t be for three years,” Ms Johnson said. “For six months we dropped flyers around the houses here in the area, we put him on the lost and found Facebook page and contacted the pounds and the vets to see if anyone had picked him up.” Having had no success in finding Marbles, Ms Johnson came to the conclusion that her cat may have been run over or stolen. (ABC Tropical North: Sophie Kesteven ) “They should design cat cam for cats so you can see what they get up to,” she said, tongue-in-cheek. Photo:
Ms Johnson says her family are glad to have their cat Marbles back after discovering his photo on a lost and found Facebook page. (ABC Tropical North: Sophie Kesteven )
“It was!””I never ever thought we would see him again so it was amazing that after three years we were getting him back.”Despite looking similar to social media sensation Grumpy Cat, Ms Johnson said Marbles was, in fact, a very affectionate cat.”My sons were so glad to have him back and my grandkids just think he’s amazing,” she said.Ms Johnson put a post on social media after being reunited with her family pet last week. “He went straight to the vet and had a nice clip and shampoo.”Despite his distinct odour and unkempt fur, Ms Johnson believed he was fed by someone while he was astray because he did not return undernourished. “I got over 100 comments back from people saying it’s given them hope that they’re going to find their pet one day,” she said.Where did Marbles go?Although Marbles still appeared to be the same affectionate cat Ms Johnson last saw in 2013, his appearance had drastically changed when they picked him up from the pound.
ABC Tropical North

By

Sophie Kesteven

Updated

August 18, 2016 18:23:08

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Happy to be home: Six-year-old Marbles went missing in 2013. (ABC Tropical North: Sophie Kesteven )
A north Queensland family has a local lost and found Facebook page to thank after finding their missing cat who went AWOL three years ago.Sharon Johnson’s pure-bred white chinchilla cat, Marbles, went missing in June 2013 in Mackay.
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Opera Australia soprano Taryn Fiebig goes back to school

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“Sure, 100 per cent,” she said.”It’s very hard work, very satisfying, your musical family just grows and grows and you are exposed to the most incredible music and ridiculous storylines.”Do it. Photo:
Taryn Fiebig runs a workshop for year 12 singing students at Churchlands Senior High School. (720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
Fiebig said returning to her old school and leading masterclasses was “gorgeous … “It was from there I went to Sydney and I have been with Opera Australia for 12 years now.”Opera’s leading ladyAfter her friend gave Fiebig “the kick that I needed”, her career has gone from strength to strength.She snagged the lead role of Eliza Dolittle in Opera Australia’s My Fair Lady and recently performed to sold-out shows in Cosi Fan Tutte at the Sydney Opera House. Perth-born soprano Taryn Fiebig has returned to her former high school for a concert and a series of masterclasses with leading singing students.Fiebig graduated from Churchlands Senior High School, which runs a selective music program, in 1989. She has since gone on to have leading roles in Opera Australia productions. “I was quite torn about that,” she said.”I went and got a cello degree first. (720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
“I filled in the application form to do musical theatre a few times and I never turned up to the auditions.”At the suggestion of a friend, Fiebig applied for the Opera Australia studio program 12 years ago. External Link:

Taryn Fiebig: La Bohème Opera Australia
“The choral system was really strong here then under the direction of Prue Ashurst — she really enthused me,” Fiebig said.”I think there had always been a voice there but it was really realised here and given great opportunity. “Absolutely know what you are singing about.”And for teens considering following in her footsteps, she would not hesitate to recommend a career as a professional singer. to be able to come back and give back”.”The other day I came in early, about eight in the morning, and … What could you lose?”Fiebig will perform at Churchlands Concert Hall on August 19 in From School To Opera Australia along with a number of current students. “Again, I didn’t turn up on the day,” she said.”My friend rang me and said, ‘Get your arse down here right now, we are not leaving until you arrive’.”So I did — and I sang and they gave it to me on the spot. Photo:
Taryn Fiebig in a masterclass with year 12 choral students. “Now I come back and think it’s fantastic.”Mentoring young singersFeibig’s advice to young music students is simple: “Practice, practice and more practice.””For singers — understand your text, even if it is in English. I was hearing all this beautiful music again.”When I was here, we didn’t know we were good, we just enjoyed it. She credits her time at Churchlands for igniting her passion for singing. “We sang every day.”Audition no-showsEven after graduation, it took a number of years and a certain amount of prodding for Fiebig to finally pursue a career in singing.
(720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne) 720 ABC Perth

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Emma Wynne

Updated

August 18, 2016 16:33:39

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Taryn Fiebig recently performed to sold-out shows at the Sydney Opera House.

Netball keeps me young: 69yo notches up decades on court

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I think it’s a privilege.” (ABC Capricornia: Chrissy Arthur)
Her family encouraged her to try, showing her a story from the newspaper about a netball team of women in their 70s in nearby Gladstone.”I started in a low grade and there were other girls in the team who weren’t physically perfect, and they were very supportive,” Ms Christensen said.Netball a family affairToday, her whole family is heavily involved in netball.”Two of my granddaughters play — we have played in the same team,” she said.”Of course they outstripped me. I didn’t blow my whistle’ and then I realise,” she said.”I love the friendship, the teamwork, the ways we all support each other. (ABC Capricornia: Chrissy Arthur)
Ms Christensen has a hearing impairment, and said it sometimes created complications on the court.”I don’t always hear the hooter at the end of the game, so everybody’s walking off and I’m thinking ‘Where are they going? “My family keeps me grounded, and my netball keeps me young,” Ms Christensen said.”It keeps me physically active, and between playing and umpiring I’m a lot more active than a lot of my peers.”Ms Christensen said the intense physicality of the sport had not been a problem as an older player.”Since I’ve got older I’ve become much more careful about warming up, and I find I get less injuries now because I warm up before I start a game,” she said.She plays with the Runaways Netball Club, and umpires for the Rockhampton Netball Association and at representative carnivals in Queensland and northern New South Wales.Ms Christensen’s interest in the sport began when her youngest daughter started playing.”We went everywhere with her, and I said one day ‘This looks like so much fun, but I’m too old, I’m 40’,” she said. “I’m grateful people let me umpire and let me play. Photo:
Helen Christensen umpires as well as plays netball. I’m down in the D grade and perfectly happy, and having a great time.”

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Netballer Helen Christensen turns 70 in December. Rockhampton’s Helen Christensen turns 70 in December, and took up netball at the age of 40. A netball player from central Queensland says the fast-paced, high-impact sport is keeping her active in her senior years. They’re much fitter and play a much higher grade.

(ABC Capricornia: Chrissy Arthur) ABC Capricornia

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Chrissy Arthur

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Jodie van de Wetering

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August 18, 2016 17:11:09

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Helen Christensen’s family is involved in netball, including granddaughter Zoe Brown.

Adelaide Zoo’s Sumatran orangutan Kluet releases jazz tune

Updated

August 19, 2016 09:51:05

Video: Adelaide Zoo orangutan records jazz single for conservation

(ABC News)
Jazz cats stand aside because Adelaide Zoo’s Sumatran orangutan Kluet has released a debut single for World Orangutan Day.Producer and primate keeper Pij Olijnyk described the tune Give me a Klue, which was created using a music-making app, as modern jazz.”There are certainly nods to a couple of classic jazz songs in there,” he said. He loves watching videos of himself. He’s got a little bit of an ego issue there perhaps, but he really cracks himself up a bit with some of those videos.”He was not prepared to claim the recording as a world first, but said it might have been.”I think that multi-tracking a song with drum and piano may well be a world first , but I’m not going to commit on that,” he said.”It’s an opportunity to just celebrate orangutans but also to raise a bit of awareness about the plight of wild orangs because they’re in a lot of trouble.”Sumatran orangutans like Kluet are critically endangered, there’s somewhere between 4,000 to 7,000 left in the wild and we’re probably losing about 1,000 a year at the moment due to habitat loss in particular.”The zoo has a partnership with Wildlife Asia to support habitat protection and rescue efforts of Sumatran orangutans. (ABC News: Michael Coggan) (ABC News: Michael Coggan)
Mr Olijnyk said the primates were often kept engaged with technology such as phones and tablet devices. Photo:
Sumatran orangutan Kluet and mate Karta in their enclosure at Adelaide Zoo. External Link:

Listen to Kluet
“I can hear a bit of Pink Panther theme and I think there’s a bit of The Way You Look Tonight as well.”Orangutans are incredibly intelligent and share 97 per cent of their DNA with humans.”He’s brilliant, [orangutans] in general are really the geniuses of the animal world.”Kluet in particular is very playful and cheeky, very inquisitive, loves to try new things.”The 20-year-old’s song is being sold on the Zoos SA website where people can pay what they would like to support Adelaide Zoo’s three Sumatran orangutans.Asked if the zoo had found a musical prodigy, the keeper said: “Definitely, I think he’s got some talent there.””The piece of music was actually recorded in two takes — one for the drums, one for the piano, so it was straight up, he was just a natural.”

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Keeper Pij Olijnyk with a signed copy of Kluet’s recording. “Just as you can with a kid, we’ve come up with different apps — things like drawing and painting apps, music apps, anything like that, “he said.”Kluet loves watching videos.
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Brewing up coffee success for Adelaide’s disadvantage teens

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Barista trainer Matthew Hojem with KIK Coffee employee Lachlan Broekx. (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
Fellow KIK colleague Tanecia Van Dem Berg also left school before the end of year 12.”Most of my friends had finished grade 12 and I had dropped out of school, so I had nowhere left to go,” she said.The 18-year-old said she withdrew from her friends and society in general.”A lot of the youth, if they have nothing to do, they are bored and get into drugs and alcohol and do stupid things that won’t better them.”She said she found happiness training for her role at KIK and had re-enrolled in school.The first of five stores plannedMs Noble said the Tea Tree Gully cafe was the first of five stores she planned to open, all staffed by local disadvantaged youth.”I’m already jumping to the next store,” she said.”We are going to have the next coffee shop opened within six months.”Ms Noble said she was inspired by the turnarounds she had seen in the program’s participants.She said she truly believed in the young people of the area and wanted them to strive to succeed.”If they want to manage a shop, we are going to have so many to open,” she said.”That would be fantastic.” (891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson)
Breaking the cycleThe majority of KIK’s staff have experienced social isolation due to homelessness, family violence, mental illness or drug and alcohol abuse — some have experienced a combination of all of them.For 16-year-old Janaya Rough, a combination of anxiety and depression saw her retreat daily to her bedroom and disconnect from her friends.”I just felt really uncomfortable around people,” she said.As Janaya’s condition worsened, she began to skip school before dropping out for good last year.”I’d go deeper and deeper into the black hole and felt like I could not escape.”I had nothing to look forward to.”She said her outlook on life had changed since completing the Inspired Buy training.”At the start of it, it was an up and down journey,” she said.”But now I am finally happy.”[Before] I just didn’t want to be alive — but now I am living; I want to be alive, I want to see my friends, I want earn money and I want to have a future for myself.”

Photo:
Tanecia Van Dem Berg, Louise Nobes and Janaya Rough prepare for the launch of KIK Coffee. A coffee shop designed and staffed by 15 disadvantaged teenagers will open its doors next week in Tea Tree Gully.KIK Coffee is part of a youth entrepreneurial program developed by Inspired Buy chief executive Louise Nobes.A social worker for 15 years in Adelaide’s northern suburbs, Ms Nobes developed Inspired Buy to help attract commercial support for social enterprises in the area.”I founded it with the core belief that all young people, no matter their life experiences, can achieve greatness,” she said.”We have one of the highest rates of youth unemployment nationally in the northern suburbs and we also have kids who are just disengaged.”There has to be a new way of thinking.”After eight months of small business and catering training, Ms Noble’s KIK Coffee team will open for business on Monday at Tea Tree Plaza Plus.
(891 ABC Adelaide: Brett Williamson) 891 ABC Adelaide

By

Brett Williamson

Posted

August 19, 2016 13:04:31

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The store was designed and will be run by disadvantaged northern suburbs teens.
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Melbourne woman named among world’s top enamel jewellers

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By Kathy Lord

Updated

August 21, 2016 05:44:18

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The enamel necklace handmade by Debbie Sheezel that won her the prestigious award. (Supplied: Debbie Sheezel)
“I love butterflies. But the market for high-end jewellery is a small one.”You have to sell your pieces otherwise you’ve got a collection like this because I don’t sell that many pieces,” she said.”They’re collector’s pieces because they’re only one off. “I’d never been in a competition before so it was very exciting.”Tim Peel, the president of the Gold and Silversmiths Guild of Australia, said enameling is an unusual skill that takes a long time to master.”It’s extremely complex, the way that she mixes and blends colours particularly,” he said.”You obviously need a really good sense of design to carry it off, an amazing sense of colour, and it requires an enormous amount of patience.”Up with the best in the world

Photo:
Examples of Ms Sheezel’s enamel jewellery in Malvern studio. It was love at first sight and I’ve been enamelling ever sinceCraft a closely guarded secret

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Ms Sheezel has been doing enamel work for 50 years and still loves it. (ABC News: Debbie Sheezel)
There were no teachers back then. I like looking at them and enjoying them myself.”Mr Peel said Australia punches above its weight in the jewellery industry and Ms Sheezel is right up at the top. Everyone had their own method, even their own specially-made tools, and Ms Sheezel taught herself how to do enamel work by reading books.She has been working in enamel for 50 years and will turn 70 soon.”I can’t help myself, I have to keep working,” she said.Ms Sheezel always knew about the Saul Bell Award for enamelling but did not have the confidence to enter.”I thought ‘oh I don’t know if I’ve got the confidence to go in for this because I’ve seen people who have won it in the past’,” she said.”Then I decided I’m getting old, I’d better get on and do it.” Fascinated by the colours of butterflies

Photo:
A close up of the award-winning enamel necklace made by Ms Sheezel. “This is very much an example of how Australian craftspeople are up there with the very best in the world,” he said.”She’s definitely up there with the best in the world.” I’m fascinated by the colours of them, the blending of the colours and so I decided I’d go with a butterfly piece,” she said.”There are hundreds and hundreds of people who go into this competition so I was really very astounded that I won it. So it’s collectors or people who understand the beauty of enamel who buy them.”I’ve sold a lot of work but I don’t mind if I don’t sell them. She was not enjoying herself until a teacher explained what a kiln was used for.”He said well if you take some enamel, which is vitreous powder, and put it on some copper, silver or gold, and he got some white and put on the copper and put it in the kiln,” she said.”After a minute he took it out and it was white and glossy and it was stuck to this beautiful copper and I fell in love.”Just like that. (Supplied: Debbie Sheezel)
It took five months for Ms Sheezel to design and to make the stunning enamel necklace, valued at $50,000, which eventually won the top prize.It was designed in the vein of French glassmaker Lalique, with enamel, 24 and 18 carat gold, fine silver and semi-precious stones. (ABC News: Jessica Longbottom)
The necklace will remain in Ms Sheezel’s collection for now until she finds a buyer. I’ve done a lot of butterfly pieces. She is one of the best enamelist jewellers in the world and she has got the award to prove it.Debbie Sheezel won a prestigious international jewellery accolade, the 2016 Saul Bell Award for enamelling, and she is absolutely thrilled.Enamelling is an art form dating back to the time of the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Celts, Chinese and Japanese.Finely ground up pieces of vitreous enamel, specially formulated ground glass, is mixed with colours that are kiln-fired in thin layers onto precious metals such as gold and silver.Ms Sheezel fell in love with the craft as a young woman when she attended a gold and silver smithing class with an aunt.

Mystery Marree Man restored as outback tourist attraction

(Supplied: Marree Hotel, Greg Dunstan) 891 ABC Adelaide

Updated

August 20, 2016 11:54:28

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Marree Man took five days’ work with a grader to restore to the desert landscape.
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Calls to return Lake Eyre to Aboriginal name
We finished it at two o’clock yesterday afternoon and from the air it looks absolutely stunning.” We did everything we possibly could to ensure we’re doing justice to the original creators,” he told 891 ABC Adelaide.”It’s about what we, in the far north of SA, can develop and I think now we’ve got a long-term, sustainable attraction that hopefully will provide a lot of benefits. (Wikimedia Commons: Peter Campbell)
“You could see some evidence on the ground of the original work — the right-hand side of the man had totally disappeared but we did find, in doing our ground surveys, about 250 original bamboo nursery skewers (stakes) that were used to peg out the Marree Man back in 1998.”I mean, that’s an extraordinary effort in itself considering it’s 28 kilometres around, and every 10 metres around they’d put in a bamboo nursery skewer.”Improvements in technology made it much easier to accurately plot Marree Man this time, with the keen restoration team using GPS and images taken from space.”With technology today we could gradually merge all this and build up a data file that gave us a very, very accurate grid reference on the ground,” Mr Turner explained.He said the restoration work started last Monday and was finished on Friday afternoon.”I’ve never used a grader as a paint brush before, but we did,” he said.”By following our GPS coordinates we painstakingly did it step by step. Marree Man, a desert artwork which mysteriously appeared in the outback almost two decades ago, has returned to the far north of South Australia.Marree Hotel publican Phil Turner and other locals have worked for the past five days to plough the outline back into the desert sands.”This is about restoring the myth and the mystery. “We desperately need tourism and I think everyone in the area recognises that.”The artwork was first spotted in 1998 and became a big tourist attraction, as people descended on the remote area in four-wheel-drives, or got the best view by flying over the desert.”There’s a tremendous amount of myth and mystery because no-one saw anyone actually put it on the ground,” Mr Turner said.”The original creators haven’t come forward and that, of course, has given speculation to how it was done, who did it.”Outback pub visitors remembered the originalMr Turner said the big number of pub visitors who remembered the artwork after it had all but disappeared into the sand made him keen to revive it.”Because we’d been getting inquiries about it every day at the hotel, about three years ago I started working with the Arabana Aboriginal Corporation to talk about the possibility of restoring it,” he said. Photo:
Marree Man is best appreciated from the air.

Fear of flying no barrier to fan’s love of actor Nathan Page

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Nathan Page and fan Ryan Wadsworth catch up during Adelaide rehearsals. (ABC News)
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Miss Fisher's fashions on show in Brisbane exhibition
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August 21, 2016 09:57:13
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Nathan Page is one of just four actors playing 139 roles in the show. He brings understatement in an age of hyperbole,” she said. A chance to see Australian actor Nathan Page on stage in Adelaide has prompted an overseas fan to ignore her fear of flying and travel to Australia.The production of the Hitchcock classic, The 39 Steps, is on target to become the State Theatre Company’s biggest-grossing production.Its star is possibly best known for his role as Jack Robinson in the television series Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.The TV show and Page in particular have an international following, including many fans online.When it was announced the Victorian-based actor would head State Theatre’s Adelaide production, Canadian fan Ryan Wadsworth booked her plane ticket despite her dislike of air travel.The chance to see Page on stage was too good to ignore, she said.”He’s incredibly generous with his fans and that’s why he has the loyalty that he has. (Supplied)
The Canadian plans to see the show twice during her 10-day visit and Page said he was flattered.”It’s wonderful, it’s gratifying and they’re my strongest support base and in an industry where you’re always putting yourself on the front line and it can be really cruel, when you have incredible support base there’s nothing to compare to it,” he said.The actor and his arguably biggest fan met briefly during the final rehearsals for the Adelaide shows.Page said the production was “Hitchcock on steroids” as it would have four actors playing 139 characters, which made for controlled mayhem off stage, an assessment with which director Jon Halpin agreed.”We actually have to rehearse just the costume changes as well so that out front it looks completely seamless,” he said.
Four decades of theatre costumes up for sale in Adelaide

Adelaide bridging visa student writes book, wins scholarship

Refugee tells of 'huge' decision to leave Iran for new home of Adelaide
By Simon Royal

Posted

August 21, 2016 10:34:30
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Hayat Nowruzi went back to Rostrevor to share his book with some of the young students. (ABC News)
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I tried kangaroo meat and liked that too, but pies are my favourite,” he said.As part of his ongoing efforts to become proficient in English the young man wrote a book, Ahmad and his Friends, the story of an Afghan school boy who loses his way and skips classes until he makes a new friend.”The book is about hard work and the importance of choosing good friends wisely,” Mr Nowruzi said.”With the value of hard work I was trying to say [that] whatever you are doing today, tomorrow we are going to see the result.”Scholarship opportunity at Adelaide UniversityHis work ethic has now been rewarded with a scholarship to support his Adelaide University studies, but his old school principal Simon Dash said such opportunities also highlighted a shortcoming. Even when he spent time in immigration detention on Christmas Island, now-Adelaide resident Hayat Nowruzi nurtured a habit of grasping every opportunity.”It was stressful, but it was also a big opportunity for me to improve my English,” he said of his time in detention after, as a 17-year-old, he arrived on the island by boat in 2013.”I’d learnt some English in Afghanistan, but it wasn’t at a good level, so I was focused on improving my English in the detention centre.”Mr Nowruzi fled Afghanistan because his Hazara ethnic group had long faced regional persecution.In 2014 another opportunity arose and he became a student of Adelaide’s Rostrevor College.Principal Simon Dash said the boys’ school had a long tradition of taking on refugee and asylum seeker students.”I see this as part of our charter to really be looking for people on the margins and what we can do to assist them,” he said. Photo:
Hayat Nowruzi recently went back to his former secondary school. (ABC News)
“I didn’t know about this until Hayat told me, but he’s on a bridging visa and that means he’s not eligible for HECS,” Mr Dash explained.”The only way Hayat and anyone else on a bridging visa can pursue higher education would be as a full fee-paying student and that effectively rules them out.”Mr Dash would like to see the HECS rules changed, but federal Education Minister Simon Birmingham said a balance needed to be struck.”People on bridging visas do not have permanent residency rights,” Senator Birmingham said.”No matter how worthy the occasional individual case, it would be irresponsible to provide taxpayer-subsidised loans to people with a high risk of not staying in Australia.”Unlike people on bridging visas, those with humanitarian visas are entitled to HECS loans because they have a right to stay in Australia.Mr Nowruzi said he would love to remain in Australia, if allowed.”As an Afghan who fled a war-torn place, I really feel privileged and grateful for living in this country and that’s because here I am treated as a human,” he said.At least something of his Australian journey now has a permanent place — his book sits on the shelves of the Rostrevor College library. “Today in Australia some of the most marginalised people are the asylum seekers and that’s something we have a deep commitment to, the people who are doing it tough.”Mr Nowruzi lived in the school’s boarding house and studied every evening, apart from Fridays.He developed a liking for Australian pies.”I liked pie night when they’d serve us pies for dinner in the cafeteria.
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Lockhart River on the road to local success

(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter) ABC Far North

By Brendan Mounter

Updated

August 22, 2016 09:32:46

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Darren Macumboy and Wilfred Accoom work long days building roads in Lockhart River.
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Beef boom creating more job opportunities for Indigenous Land Corporation
(ABC Far North: Brendan Mounter)
A role model for remote Indigenous businessLockhart River’s goal is to build local entrepreneurs and Cr Piva said he hoped his shire’s early success could pave the way for other Indigenous business opportunities.”I hope that there are companies out there willing to give us a go like Tutt Bryant’s done, giving us the faith to lease their machines,” Cr Piva said.”There are opportunities out there, just get out there and give it a go.”Try and empower your own people, get them involved as well so they understand the day-to-day running of businesses.” The Pascoe Farm roadworks will be completed by the end of August. A remote Cape York Aboriginal Shire Council is taking a ‘local first’ approach to awarding civil works contracts in a bid to build home-grown entrepreneurs.A group of Lockhart River roadworkers have formed their own business and tendered for work that would otherwise go to a fly-in fly-out workforce.Councillor Paul Piva, responsible for economic development in the community, said some 70 kilometres of roadworks around the community provided council with a chance to build local capacity.”It’s given us the opportunity to get 100 per cent Indigenous boys to go out there and work on the roads,” Cr Piva said.”Last year we gave it a go with two machines and then the local boys [saw] me and said ‘Paul, we’d like to give it a go as well’ and I said ‘Well, the opportunity’s there, the money’s there — why don’t we keep the money in the community?'”That’s basically when the penny dropped and everybody said ‘Let’s do the same thing, let’s lease our own machines’ and that’s what we’ve done this year.” Keeping the money within community and creating jobs ‘on country’The $2 million worth of contracts have employed eight young men including 35-year-old Kanthanumpu man Wilfred Accoom who commutes two hours between site and home each day.”We’ve just been working on the formation of the road, putting re-sheet on the road,” Mr Accoom said.”Yeah, hard work getting up at four o’clock in the morning, driving out there … finishing off at six.” Mr Accoom said the long days and hard work would pay off, for both him and his people.”The money stays in the community amongst all the locals and more employment for the young people,” he said.”[We’re] trying to get them out there working on their country, giving it a go.”Darren Macumboy, aged 38, is a new trainee. He worked as a groundsman at the local school for about six years but saw the roadworks as a chance to learn new skills and earn more money for his family.”It’s time for me to seek different jobs. I’m doing my training on a roller and it’s definitely been a different experience from other jobs that I do,” Mr Macumboy said.The Wuthathi man said he was proud to be building roads on his country and wanted to set a path for his people.”When I’m working in community it feels good, you know you’re not away from your family and you’re right here working, you’re surrounded by families too,” he said.”Not only for my family but for the younger generation, I’m trying to be a role model — to show them that it’s not hard to get up and try different stuff and when you do, at the end of the day you’ll reach your goal.”

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Lockhart River councillor Paul Piva holds the economic development, employment and training portfolio for Lockhart River Aboriginal Shire Council.

Family on ‘amazing’ US cycling road trip with autistic son

How parents should deal with childhood obsessions
Love on the spectrum: Meet Ruth and Thomas
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Travis, Fiona and Patch at Sherman Pass on the cycling trip across the US. (Supplied) Why don’t I give that to you in case you want to drive around and look at the area?’,” Fiona said.You can follow Fiona, Travis and Patch’s School of The Road Trip via their Facebook page. Photo:
Patch enjoying the family ride across the US. (Supplied)
Patch was diagnosed autism when he was just 21 months old.Autism affects Patch through minimal verbal communication, complex and restricted behavioural patterns and motor planning delays.”The past five years of our lives have been dedicated to Patch and his therapy and to helping him achieve as much as possible,” Fiona said.Both Fiona and Travis had cycle toured before, so to share the journey across America with Patch seemed like the perfect family trip.”So often there is a concentration on what your child can’t do,” Fiona said.”We want to give Patch the sense that he can do anything.”Patch is a gorgeous, happy child and we have been thrilled to meet people who have really embraced him and seen him for who he is.”A bicycle built for twoThe couple are using a semi-recumbent tandem and a standard bicycle for the trip.Patch is able to sit up front on the extended frame of the tandem bike while Travis does the leg work.”Their heads are really close together, so the whole trip Travis is talking to him and telling him what is happening, reading out signs and explaining to him what we are doing,” Fiona said.”His favourite part of the trip is going downhill.”
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Facebook video: School of The Road downhill ride
5,000 kilometres and a lifetime of experiencesThe three-month journey across America has provided the family with something so many crave — uninterrupted time together.”[Patch] is just loving that really close family communication and family time that we are being able to have,” Fiona said.”You can see that joy on his face to just be part of this and have us around.”They have also been overwhelmed by moments of kindness shown to them by complete strangers.One man in Montana offered the trio a home to stay in for the night.”He then said, ‘I’ve got a spare car. Adelaide parents Fiona and Travis are riding 5,000 kilometres across America with their seven-year-old son Patch to prove there is no limit to a life with autism.”We wanted to do something amazing as a family,” Fiona said, as the family stopped for a break in North Dakota.They are halfway through their ride from Washington state to Washington DC.
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Brett Williamson

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August 22, 2016 12:33:08

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Patch, Travis and Fiona on their customised bicycles, riding across America. (Supplied)
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Horses enable full life for woman living with autism

Brisbane engineer-turned-luthier helps music lovers build guitars

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Andrew Armstrong talking about guitar he created for the Kathmandu guitar project
“I picked up the shape of the flag and replicated it around in contrasting woods,” he said.”Getting it done was a challenge.”The guitar will be raffled off later in the year with tickets available through the Kathmandu Kids charity website. (612 ABC Brisbane: Ann Leung)
Mr Armstrong said he became hooked on string instruments after pulling apart an electric guitar in high school.”The love just grew from there,” he said.Since then, Mr Armstrong’s reputation as a guitar maker and fixer has grown.Well-known Australian guitarist Michael Fix has become one of his biggest fans, often seeking him out for guitar repairs.”He’s been my go-to guy,” Fix said.Mr Armstrong shares his skill and passion at his workshops, where students are taught how to shape the wood, make soundboards and build necks.”I’ve had students with no wood-working skills at all and they’ve successfully made a guitar or ukulele,” Mr Armstrong said.”People get a deep satisfaction out of playing an instrument that they’ve made.” Lending skills to charityMr Armstrong recently built a guitar to raise money for the Kathmandu Kids project — a charity that funds education programs to help children get out of the slums in Nepal.The guitar is worth more than $10,000 and includes a nod to the Nepalese flag on the body of the guitar around the sound hole. A Brisbane guitar maker is teaching music-loving residents how to make the instruments by hand.Luthier Andrew Armstrong gave up a lucrative full-time position as an engineer to start running Brisbane’s only guitar-making workshops.The workshops in Sumner, west of Brisbane, show people step-by-step how to build a guitar or ukulele — from scratch.”After a 30-year career, as I got older I realised the professional life wasn’t for me anymore,” Mr Armstrong said.”I wanted to do something with guitars and making guitars.”

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The workshops foster a sense of community.
612 ABC Brisbane

By Jessica Hinchliffe and community correspondent Ann Leung

Posted

August 22, 2016 12:50:40

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Workshop participants learn how to build a guitar from the ground up. (612 ABC Brisbane: Ann Leung)
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