Police recruits make fresh start with Bagot community

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Bagot residents spent time talking with the new recruits before showing off their basketball skills. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Jacqueline Breen)
“We’ve been running cultural awareness training sessions with them over the last couple of years at [Darwin’s police headquarters],” Mr King said.”But we’ve always thought it’d be a really good idea to run that final session on a community.”Community president Helen Fejo-Frith said some residents were sceptical about the police visit, but she was hopeful of a positive outcome.”A lot of them sort of looked really shocked when I first told them and they said, ‘what, what for?’,” she said.”I said that [the police] wanted to come into a community where they can talk to the people face-to-face instead of hearing from somebody else what it’s like.”I think [that’s] really important.”Over a few hours, the recruits introduced themselves to some community members, visited the old age centre, cooked a barbeque and squared off against teams of locals on the community’s basketball court.Linking up against domestic violenceBefore the games the teams linked arms with the officers in the “no more” stance against violence that Mr King has been spreading across the Northern Territory. (105.7 ABC Darwin: Jacqueline Breen)
Last year Conway Stevenson was sentenced to 14 years in prison for the brutal bashing of his partner in Bagot, who died after the five-hour ordeal in 2013.In September, Northern Territory police revealed that officers had responded to 75,000 incidents of domestic violence in the past three years, in light of coronial findings following the death of two Alice Springs women that described domestic violence as “a contagion” in some Aboriginal communities.”We’re trying to link people together to try and build an army to deal with family violence,” Mr King said.”It hides away but we’re going to try and bring it out in the open.”New recruits hoping to make a differenceRecruit Lukas O’Donohue, 25, from Tennant Creek, said he had joined the police force after time spent working as a correctional officer.”I saw the aftermath of problems,” he said of his previous job.”I thought, ‘I want to move jobs to possibly get out here and actually stem the problems before they end up in work camps and prison’.” Twenty-six-year-old Danielle Keenan moved from Sydney to join the force in the Territory and said the visit to Bagot had been eye-opening.”It’s good to come here and show them that we are here to help, we are here to actually make a difference,” she said.”We want to work with them rather than work against them, or only come here when there’s incidents that need police attention.” Photo:
Anti-violence campaigner Charlie King listens to a young Bagot resident talk about relations with police. “Thousands of people drive past here everyday,” anti-violence campaigner Charlie King said of Darwin’s Bagot community, but according to King the community was not well understood.”There are some good things that happen in here and some not so good things — and we want to do something about the not so good things.”The leading voice behind the Northern Territory’s homegrown campaign against family violence stood in front of a sign that read “Bagot community welcomes NT police”.He brought 30 young recruits there to meet community members before they graduate into the Northern Territory Police Force, in a bid to build better relationships between the two groups.
(105.7 ABC Darwin: Jacqueline Breen) 105.7 ABC Darwin

By

Jacqueline Breen

Updated

October 26, 2016 10:42:15

Photo:
Two recruits catch their breath during the basketball game with Bagot residents.
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Darwin 0800

Tap-dancing grandmother says age no barrier

“I found myself with time on my hands. (Facebook: Tap into Dance Rockhampton & Capricorn Coast)
“It gives me something to do, it keeps me fit, keeps my mind active — at my age you can get dementia but I don’t think there’s any fear of that.”Mrs Allen said it was never too late to take up a hobby, and age was no barrier.”I think as you get older you should have a hobby for exercise, to keep your mind active, and it gives you a much brighter outlook,” she said.”I still feel a bit strange when people say ‘You’re tap dancing at your age’, but I enjoy it. Central Queensland grandmother Shirley Allen has been tap dancing for nine years, proof it is never too late take up a hobby.The 79-year-old never had the opportunity to dance when she was growing up, but she never gave up on her dream.”I was born before the Second World War and of course there weren’t many classes around, especially tap dancing,” Mrs Allen said.This was pushed even further out of her reach when she was 12 and her mother became ill. Although the group is made up of women of various ages, Mrs Allen is one of the oldest by at least a couple of decades.”I still feel about 50, until I look in the mirror,” she laughed.”The girls are really lovely, and they treat me like I am one of them.”Technology helps with dance practiceThere have been some challenges with taking on a new hobby at this age.Mrs Allen said it was difficult at times to learn new steps, but her teacher would break it down so she and other could understand — and she was not averse to using some extra help.”Although I must confess now with the modern technology I put it on my phone and practise at home,” she laughed. “No!” “I was always envious of a young girl who lived next to my grandmother’s, and she used to go to ballet,” Mrs Allen said.Life just slipped by.”I started work, got married and had seven beautiful children, and didn’t have the time to do anything then,” Mrs Allen said.”But I always kept this in my mind.”Nine years ago, that all changed. (Supplied)
Since then, Mrs Allen has been tap dancing every week and is part of a 17-strong troupe, The Diamonds, performing every year at the annual Rockhampton Dance Festival.The festival attracts dancers from all over central Queensland, and like most years, The Diamonds took out the top prize with their routine to a techno-version of Singing in the Rain. Instead, she watched Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers films and became enthralled by the speed tapping of Anne Miller. “It’s really good for friendships, it gets you out of the house, if you have any worries at home you go there and if they see you looking sad, there’s a group hug and then everything goes on with your class again.”And can she imagine a life without dancing?”No,” she laughed. Mrs Allen eventually had to stay home and care for her younger sister. Photo:
Shirley Allen (front left) and The Diamonds dance troupe in their costumes for their Singin’ in the Rain. Why not attend?'”

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Shirley Allen just about to go on stage. I saw this dance class advertised for adult ladies and I decided, ‘Oh well.
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Rockhampton 4700
ABC Capricornia

By Inga Stunzner

Posted

October 25, 2016 17:47:30

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Shirley Allen took up tap dancing at the age of 70. (ABC Capricornia: Inga Stunzner)

Deng Adut on being a child soldier, moving to Australia and dealing with racism

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By Leigh Sales and Julia Holman

Posted

October 25, 2016 18:51:39

Video: Deng Adut was a child soldier in South Sudan and now runs his own law firm in Sydney. (ABC News)
Portrait of refugee advocate named Archibald Prize People's Choice winner

It took years for him to get used to living here.”Every single thing was new,” he said.”You can’t compare going to get water from the Nile and drink it, and going to the fridge or going to the tap and drink it.”In particular the cold weather was hard to deal with, and one time he almost blew up his house when he was trying to warm up.”I got a can of Coca-Cola, and because it was cold I told my sister-in-law that I wanted to warm it up, my sister-in-law said yes because she didn’t know any better than me,” he said.”So I pick up a can and put it in the microwave, put the timer on, press it, and within three or four seconds it just detonated like a bomb and the power gone to the whole place.”‘Why should I fight the rubbish that comes out of people’s mouths’Deng has been in Australia for more than 20 years and said racism was a regular part of his life. As a child in South Sudan he was taken from his family and forced to fight as a soldier.When he was 12 he escaped to Kenya, where he was given refugee status and moved to Australia when he was a teenager.He taught himself to read, put himself through university and today he owns a law firm in Western Sydney.He came to prominence when his story was told in a viral ad promoting Western Sydney University. I don’t want to be involved with another conflict. My conflict is over.”I try to work on me, on myself, and try to work on helping other people.”

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This portrait of Deng Adut by Nick Stathopoulos won the People’s Choice award in the 2016 Archibald Prize. Deng Adut’s story is remarkable. Now he is about to release a book about his life, Songs of a War Boy.’I have nightmares every night’Today Deng is still haunted by the horrific scenes he witnessed as a child soldier.”It started from the journey when we went from South Sudan to Ethiopia. There’s no night that I don’t wake up, frightened about what I’ve seen. Most of them are overqualified based on their resume.” (Supplied: Art Gallery of NSW)
He sees himself as an underachieverDespite his success against the odds, Deng does not see his achievements as anything particularly special. But he has no interest in fighting back.”I don’t have time to waste with them,” he said.”I’ve spent so much time fighting war, why should I fight the rubbish that comes out of people’s mouths that has no meaning to me? He said there are many people just like him, but they are just not given the education and work opportunities he was afforded.”My brother was overqualified, but just because his English was so bad doesn’t mean that his life skill was secondary,” he said.”His life skills, his experience on how to deal with people, and how to deal with life, it was exceptional.”There are a lot of people, Sudanese, from my background, who did exactly what I did. And there’s no night where I would just wake up happily, just like a normal person.”
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Western Sydney University's ad featuring Deng Adut's story
Culture shock in AustraliaOnce he was resettled in Australia the culture shock was intense. It was horror,” he said.”Seeing people dying, kids dying, people dying from thirst, people getting shot on the way.”I have nightmares every night.
From child soldier to refugee lawyer: One man's inspiring journey from Sudan to Sydney
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Changing your life and going off the grid

ABC Central Victoria

By

Larissa Romensky

Posted

October 26, 2016 08:33:04
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Chewton 3451
(ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
But the keen coffee drinkers have made sure the coffee machine remains, and are in the process of updating their system.Their “tiny” 1.5 kilowatt-solar power system and 14-year-old lead acid batteries are backed up by gas bottles for cooking, and a generator that is on three to four hours a day so they can maintain their power.With the cost of a new system averaging $20,000 – $30,000 the couple are looking at changing to new gel batteries or lithium batteries for a fraction of the cost.Even though Ms Purdie has worked in environmental sector for 10 years, she said prior to living off the grid they did not realise how much electricity they used.”You go to iron a shirt and you turn the iron on and the generator goes from this nice little hum to this crazy roar,” Mr Purdie said.In addition to learning to make changes to their lives and not take things for granted, the couple have also have also come to appreciate the diverse, creative and environmentally aware community they live in.”People think, ‘Oh you’re in some kind of hippy commune?’ and I’m like, ‘No we’re not, everyone is actually very independent but we all come together when we need to,'” Mr Purdie said.The sense of community is brought together through occasional curry nights, film nights and the annual Christmas party; people work together to offer each other support, especially through fire season with the creation of a community fire tree to help with communication.”There is this real community feel but there’s also equally a respect of people’s privacy and independence,” Mr Purdie said. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
After not being able to afford a house deposit in inner-city Melbourne, Tim Purdie and Hannah Nicholas moved to the Mornington Peninsula and then to the Chewton Bushlands in search of some land with wildlife on it.Initially it was more the bush that drew them to their house rather than the prospect of living off the grid.”Looking back we were quite naive in the work and additional things that you do need to do living off the grid,” Ms Nicholas said.They did not realise that part of the deal was no rubbish collection.”We’ve had some pretty crazy adventures with going down to the tip with both our heads out the window going, ‘Oh my god, it stinks, why did we leave it for two months?'” Mr Purdie said.But they have adapted and, after four years, have become used to the slower, more sustainable way of living.”You do have to change your behaviour,” Ms Nicholas said.”For us we had to get rid of our electric kettle, our electric toaster, my hair dryer.”Mr Purdie recalls trudging out in the early morning to start the generator dressed in sheepskin boots when Hannah needed to dry her hair.”It would be like minus three degrees in the morning and I’d still be in my pyjamas and Hannah would be like, ‘I’m running late I’ve got to get the hairdryer going,'” he said.”As soon as we moved here we found that anything with an element in it was too much for our solar system and we’d have to put the generator on,” Mr Purdie said. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
Five years later, with a bigger, more powerful system, they both said they wouldn’t change the way they live for anything.”We made a really brilliant decision in terms of community and a sense of place, a sense of belonging,” Ms Groen said.Their three-and-a-half kilowatt solar system, four kilowatt inverter, and a “whizz-bang” generator that they use for about 15 days each winter, enables them to run most appliances at once.”It’s pretty much a set-and-forget system,” Mr Kourkoulakos said.But it came with a $30,000 price tag they describe as a “fairly substantial investment”.”You have to be rich to be a bloody hippy,” Ms Groen said.But Mr Kourkoulakos said it needed to be put in context, explaining people can spend $30,000 on a new car or more than $500,000 on a unit in Melbourne.”We’re on six acres and we spent a lot less than that,” he said.”[Our house] was $365,000 plus a brand new solar system for $30,000,” Mr Kourkoulakos said.”For under $400,000 we’re going to live comfortably for the next 20-odd years off this solar system,” Ms Groen said.Kid off the grid

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Uma Dingemans at home. Photo:
Jim Kouroulakos and Kylie Groen’s house is completely off the grid, powered by solar panels and a back-up generator. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
Uma Dingemans, 13, does not mind being one of the few children living in the quiet serenity of the Chewton Bushlands.”I see all my friends at school everyday, so it’s not like I’m without childhood contact,” she said.She also visits her father every second weekend in nearby Castlemaine, where she relishes sitting in front of the heater, making toast and using the electric kettle.”I seem to drink a lot of tea when I’m at his house,” she laughed.She admitted that the first few years of living off the grid were a “bit difficult”, and it was a “bit weird” having to live by candlelight in the absence of solar panels.”Reading was a challenge because you’ve got to hold the candle and then you don’t want to make your book catch on fire,” she said.”I didn’t really read that much and read through the day because you don’t want to burn books that much.”But, six years later after moving from the nearby town of Castlemaine, Uma enjoys living off the grid.”I really like it up here; it’s really pretty and it’s just nice,” she said.”It’s really easy to get used to being patient.”It’s not going to kill you.”

Photo:
Uma Dingman’s home, one of more than 35 in the 121-hectare Chewton Bushlands. Photo:
Tim Purdie and Hannah Nicholas (with chicken) in their garden. Meet residents from one central Victorian off-the-grid community that is still going strong after nearly 50 years.Back in 1967 two people purchased a block of land in the central Victorian bushland with the dream of creating an alternative lifestyle.Nearly 50 years later it is still going strong; more than 35 households on separate lots living off the grid in the 121 hectares that make up the Chewton Bushlands near Castlemaine.How to get the kids to leave home

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Jim Kourkoulakos and Kylie Groen at home. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)

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Uma Dingman reads in her bedroom at home. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)

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The garden at Jim Kouroulakos and Kylie Groen’s house. We’re living in a house with no electricity, there’s no water, it’s mud brick, it’s really rudimentary, like it’s really rustic,” she laughed. and there’s no poles everywhere,” Uma said.But it is the quietness she relishes the most.”After a long day at school with kids yelling all the time and bells and announcements and teachers giving you all this information, it’s really nice to have complete quiet,” she said.Even though she hopes to eventually move to Melbourne to pursue tertiary studies she said she could see herself living like this when older.”You’re not constantly bombarded with the news — everything happening all the time — and there’s not traffic going past all the time,” she said.”You can just really turn off from the world at night and just relax here.”Listen to the generator

Photo:
Tim Purdie and Hannah Nicholas at home. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
Empty-nesters Kylie Groen and Jim Kourkoulakos have lived in the area for the last five years and joked living off the grid was the sure-fire way to get kids to move out of the family home.”Within six months they will skedaddle like rats up a water pipe, because they can’t cope with the environment,” laughed Ms Groen.She said, in the first year their family moved from inner-city Melbourne to the Chewton Bushlands in search of affordable housing, their two teenage boys hated it.With an old solar system they described as an old truck battery capable of delivering 600 watts, the two community workers admit the first year was tough, with power often running out.”If you calculate four people trying to use a computer or trying to put on a television and some lights, by 9:30pm everything would just die and stop,” Ms Groen said.She still remembered the first night waking up after a “massive panic attack”, clinging to Jim.”Oh my God, what have we done? (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
The later addition of solar panels, batteries and a generator have made life easier and Uma and her mother use portable gas bottles for cooking and hot water.But unlike many properties that use a septic system, their toilet is a compost system located outside the house.”I just avoid doing that at night, it’s just so cold,” Uma said.Despite the distance, the toilet and the time it takes to wait for the hot water to heat up, Uma said she had adjusted to the slower pace of living pretty quickly.”I do enjoy the environmental sustainability behind it … (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)

Photo:
Inside Tim Purdie and Hannah Nicholas’s house at Chewton Bushlands.

Dance classes for people with Parkinson’s

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Couples dancing during the dance with Parkinson's class
Carmen Woodmansee is the physio who started the classes as a way to get people moving — whether they have Parkinson’s or not.”We really encourage the partners or carers to come along with the person with Parkinson’s,” she said.”Less of a carer role, but just so they can have some fun together, learn together, move together and learn dance together.”Ms Woodmansee said while moving to music helps the person with Parkinson’s ward off some of the symptoms, the partners and carers also get a lot from the classes.”They’re getting all their health benefits, they’re moving for an hour, they’re working on their balance, their strength and their fitness,” she said.”It’s very much a mind workout, you’re thinking about the movements and how to link the movements together.”Dance classes bringing people togetherEileen and Wayne Jackson have been coming to the dance classes for a few months.”We just thoroughly enjoy it and I feel it’s helped me with my movement,” Mrs Jackson said.”I was diagnosed [with Parkinson’s] about six or eight years ago, but I’ve known that something was wrong for quite a bit longer than that.”It’s something that creeps up on you.”
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Wayne and Eileen Jackson doing warmups in the dance class
Mrs Jackson said while she makes sure she exercises outside of the dance class, she gets more than just fitness from attending.”A lot of laughing, all the time,” she said.Mr Jackson also takes part in the classes, though he is not always as coordinated as his wife.”I accompany my wife and yes, we both enjoy it,” he said.”Unfortunately, I’m left footed and I’ve got two left feet.”As well as giving them a good hour of exercise, the classes are also a way to keep those with Parkinson’s connected.”It brings everybody together,” Mr Jackson said. Dancing for people with Parkinson’s disease has been shown to help them with their movement — and when movement is combined with laughter, it brings even more benefits.Every Wednesday the Bellerive Quay Health Hub runs two dance classes for people with Parkinson’s, and their partners and supporters. Photo:
Class instructor Carmen Woodmansee (far right) with her class: (from left) Juddith Dand, Gregory Dand, Pru Houston, Wayne Jackson, Eileen Jackson, John Adams and Elwyn Adams. (936 ABC Hobart: Carol Rääbus)
“We’ve noticed since we started, at first everybody was shy and nobody really spoke to each other, but now it’s really become a group.”
(936 ABC Hobart: Carol Rääbus) 936 ABC Hobart

By

Carol Rääbus

Posted

October 26, 2016 11:35:48

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The dance class is a time to put Parkinson’s aside and just dance.
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Bellerive 7018
Dancing with Parkinson's: Finding relief through tango

Tales from the driver’s side: SA’s husband and wife taxi team retire

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Mount Gambier 5290
“You must look after the passengers and look after the car,” he was advised. It took her some time to get back in the car again, but Ms McDonnell said she did not let the experience sway her. (ABC South East SA: Kate Hill )
Across the years, the couple would see the same faces again and again, and got to know a wide range of “regulars” who would be delighted to see them. There is a book in it.”After Geoff’s final fare this month, the Blue Lake city’s favourite husband and wife taxi team have officially retired and are now fondly recalling their many years on the road, including the good, the bad and the sometimes ugly stories.Driving for a living was originally not on the McDonnells’ agenda. Photo:
Who is the better driver? One lady whom he got talking to gifted him a line, which he repeats to this day. “You just get back in the car and drive again.” The funny and the sadOne night, with a group of young people filling the taxi, Mr McDonnell watched shocked as a young lady stripped off while sitting in the front seat, leaving the cab wearing just a pair of jeans.”I kept my eyes on the road all the time,” said a straight-faced Geoff, who confessed the whole tale to his wife when he got home. “All the characters, stories and memories. Mr McDonnell confesses he is still ringing his bosses to see if there is any jobs for him to do. “She said to me, ‘my mum said to me that the two best psychiatrists in the world are prostitutes and taxi drivers’,” he laughs. More than 50 years of collective experience behind the wheel of a taxi has given Mount Gambier’s Mary and Geoff McDonnell a wealth of stories to tell, but one particular tale makes the couple laugh out loud.”I stopped one morning at a Mount Gambier motel, this was decades ago,” begins Mr McDonnell.”All of a sudden, this lass comes running out, very scantily clad and she jumped in and yelled ‘go, go go’!””Next came this young lad running out, with just a towel around him, yelling ‘Stop, stop, stop!'””You never know who you’re going to get next,” said 68-year-old Ms McDonnell, matter-of-factly. (ABC South East SA: Kate Hill )
But Geoff’s manners and ability to chat to anyone and everyone saw him become a fast favourite with the customers, from all walks of life. You had to teach them some manners.””I kept my calm while it was happening but I fell in a heap afterwards.”A few years after she started, Mary got a strong sense of the lengths the close-knit taxi community would go to to protect their own. “Police came from everywhere and all the taxi drivers and their colleagues came from everywhere,” she said. After that, Mary would switch off the meter and spend a little time talking to her. “He just gave a cough and it went all over me,” she said.”I tipped him out. Ever the gentleman, Geoff has kept some of the best tales to himself.”Switch it off for a minute,” he smiles, pointing at my recorder.”I’ll tell you a good one.” “It made me feel sad. “You learn very quickly the ones you can talk personally to and the ones who keep their distance.”

Photo:
Mary and Geoff McDonnell are known as the nicest husband and wife team in the business. In 1989, Mr McDonnell had suffered a serious back injury while working at a farm and struggling to find a job after an operation, found himself at the door of a local taxi company run by David and Ann Vears. A well-seasoned driver can read the tell-tale signs a patron is about to lose their dinner, but one night a well-primed male customer gave Ms McDonnell far more than a generous tip. But she was lonely.”Other customers she does not recall quite so fondly. Next morning, Ms McDonnell was called to pick up the same young lady and recognising the name, said she had to stifle a smile at the thought of her saucer-eyed husband the night prior. She was such a beautiful lady, such a character. Oh, the stink in the car was horrendous,” she said, wrinkling her nose at the memory.A disgusted Mary said she did not bother to collect her fare or the clean-up fee, electing to get home and shower off “the smell of vodka”. Butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth.” Just watching someone’s behaviour approaching the taxi was enough for a driver to learn a lot about their potential customer and sometimes decide not to accept the fare, said Ms McDonnell.”Body language is everything,” she said. The time was rightMs McDonnell retired in 2015 and after 26 years of 12-hour night shifts, Mr McDonnell decided the time was also right to take his last fare.The social atmosphere and lure of the radio chatter is hard to give up though. “You got to know families, you got to know grandchildren,” she said.Then there were the customers who Ms McDonnell would often think about long after they had left the taxi.”One of our regulars, she got in the car one day and said ‘you know, I could walk down to the supermarket, but I have to get a taxi because you are the only people I talk to through the week’,” she said.The lady explained that her family lived in Adelaide and she only spoke to them over the phone. Although the couple are happy to tell some stories, others are not for public consumption.The husband and wife team are not known as the nicest couple in the business for nothing. “She was all covered up this time. After an intoxicated customer pulled a knife on her and threatened her life, an upset Mary was able to pull into a local bottle-shop and ring for help.Fellow taxi drivers raced the police to the scene. Mary takes to the roadMeanwhile, Mary followed him into the profession two years later, the mother-of-six describing herself as the “fiery one” of the duo.”Some of the younger ones [customers] had to be told their place,” she said.”They’d get in on a Saturday night from the hotels or the nightclubs and they’d open the door and say ‘g’day mate’. I am, says Mary.
ABC South East SA

By

Kate Hill

Posted

October 26, 2016 18:06:34

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Geoff and Mary McDonnell have been married for 48 years and driving taxis for over 50 years. (ABC South East SA: Kate Hill)
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Life on the road with singing taxi driver of Cairns
History buff drives into the past in taxi number 28

Two-storey floating venue to be new hub of Adelaide Festival

Neil Armfield, Rachel Healy announced as first Adelaide Festival co-directors
(State Library of South Australia, SLSA B: 4109) Posted

October 27, 2016 07:42:45

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The Palais de Danse of the 1920s inspired festival organisers to create a modern floating venue.
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Adelaide 5000
State of the arts: Former Adelaide Festival director calls for venue upgrades
A two-storey floating entertainment and dining venue will be built as the hub of next year’s Adelaide Festival.The Riverbank Palais will be modelled on the little-remembered Floating Palais de Danse.Festival organisers said that venue mysteriously sank in 1928 after explosions were heard, and it was believed at the time that rivals of flamboyant entrepreneur Barcroft Teesdale Smith destroyed his Indian-inspired Taj Mahal of the Torrens.Adelaide Festival co-artistic director Rachel Healy is confident the new hub will prove popular.”The venue is going to be very beautiful and will float on the Torrens for the duration of the Festival and be — we hope — a kind of beacon for everyone here,” she said.”It’s an enormous project, the most challenging project of all of the festival clubs that the Adelaide Festival has created in its history.”She said the Riverbank Palais would host live music and DJs, some special events and lunches that showcase some of South Australia’s leading chefs.The Palais will open from breakfast until late night and is set to be the centrepiece of the next three Adelaide Festivals, according to organisers.They said nearly a century after its predecessor sank into obscurity, the new Festival Palais promised to be the talk of the town.
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Childhood friends too cute to bear

774 ABC Melbourne

By

Simon Leo Brown

Posted

October 27, 2016 10:07:35
Rose Milne

My teddy’s name is Ted and he was my Santa   present in 1961 when I was almost seven months old. There is a tag located near his right paw — BERLEX Melbourne. He has a squeaker in his back, however this no longer works.
Harold Shugg
Cat MacInnes

Bear is 60 years old — I’ve had him since I was three. He now stays in my bedroom on the chest of drawers. I got him back from my mum 10 years ago.
Patrick Caruana

I tried naming him Paddington, but obviously couldn’t pronounce it. This is Paggin Bear (34 years old, like me) and that’s Mrs Paggin on the left.
My wife spent the night in hospital a while ago and when I got home from visiting her, I found she’d left Ted in the bed to keep me company until she got home. Ted and I are both 55 years old.
Tim Gibney
Infographic:
Listener Carmen sent this photo of her husband’s teddy bear. (Supplied: Carmen Spiers)

Carmen Spiers

Jean Henderson
(Audience submitted: Rose Milne) Infographic:
Rose received Ted from Santa when she was six months old in 1961.

Infographic:
Jean Henderson named her son after this teddy bear, Jonathan, that she had as a child. (Audience submitted: Jean Henderson)

Jackie Griffiths

He lost his ears many moons ago and has a squeaker that still works. Here is mine. It’s Squeaky and he is 52 years old and lives on my bed during the day and on a chair at night.

(Audience submitted: Jackie Griffiths) Infographic:
Jackie received this teddy from her sister 40 years ago.

My mum, who was holding me, swooped in to move it and accidentally burnt one of my hands in the process! It still has a burn mark behind one of the ears after my sister left it leaning against the heater. She felt terrible. Here’s mine, 43-and-a-half years old.
Shannon McDonald
Infographic:
Teddy bear with burnt ear. (Audience submitted: Shannon McDonald)
My sister, who died when I was nine, bought me this for my seventh birthday. I’m 47 tomorrow.
Infographic:
Squeaky may not have ears anymore, but he can still squeak. (Audience submitted: Patrick Caruana)
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Paggin bear (right) and wife Mrs Paggin.
It came from Geelong. My husband’s bear, 55 years of age.

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Melbourne 3000
This is Jonathan. He’s 65 soon (hmm so am I). He has leather button eyes, is pretty wrecked (hmm so am I). Named my son after him.

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774 ABC Melbourne listener Tim sent in this photo of his childhood teddy bear via SMS. When 774 ABC Melbourne presenter Lindy Burns reconnected with her childhood teddy bear while visiting her parents’ home, she asked listeners to send in photos of their furry friends. (Audience submitted: Tim Gibney) The results were too good not to share.

(Audience submitted: Harold Shugg) Infographic:
55-year-old Ted “smells a bit dusty”, says Harold Shugg, but “he’s still the same ol’ Ted”.

Linen cleaners show heart and return lost toy

(Supplied: Narelle James) ABC Riverland

By

Catherine Heuzenroeder

Updated

November 02, 2016 10:18:00

Photo:
Kiana Rundell is reunited with her favourite soft toy, given to her by her godfather when she was two.
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(Supplied: Narelle James)
Linen workers found the toy elephant tangled in the motel’s bedsheets before taking time out to photograph Eli touring the laundry facility to reassure Kiana her favourite soft toy was in safe hands.”When you’ve got kids you know how sentimental they get. (Supplied: Narelle James)
“They had written a letter saying he was just on holidays with them,” Ms James said.”He had had a wonderful time, that they had enjoyed having him there, they had looked after him.”We were blown away that they would go to all that effort for a little girl they would never meet.”Eli has now settled back into life with Kiana.”He is well and truly lost somewhere in her sheets again,” Ms James said.”He is a very special teddy and he’s getting lots of love and cuddles at night, it’s lovely to have him back in our house.” It was a simple thing to do,” Princes Laundry Services’ Juliane Raroa said.”It got everyone talking about their own kids and their teddies.”The reunion between girl and elephant back home in Berri, in regional South Australia, was a noisy affair.”Kiana opened the express post and her face was amazing,” Ms James said.”This astonishment as she pulled out her teddy and she squealed, the noise went through the whole house.”‘Blown away’ by the effort of strangersA two-page letter with photos of Eli the elephant driving a forklift, folding linen and even sitting in the boss’s chair accompanied the soft toy. Photo:
Kiana Rundell tucked in bed with Eli after the pair were reunited. A young girl’s lost toy has been returned by warm-hearted cleaners who went out of their way to prove its misadventure was nothing but a fun holiday.Eli the elephant failed to return home with seven-year-old Kiana Rundell after a weekend getaway in Adelaide.”There were tears, she was fairly inconsolable to be honest, it was quite heart-breaking as a parent,” mum Narelle James said.”We actually had to lie with her that night to help her go to sleep.”The motel where the family stayed could not find the missing soft toy and it appeared lost for good until Kiana told her parents “he was in my bed, caught up in my sheets”.Her quick-thinking parents called the motel back and asked for the name of their linen laundry company.”It was a long shot, but at this stage we were pretty desperate,” Ms James said.Laundry has a bit of fun

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The two pages of photos showing Eli’s big adventure as a linen cleaning service.

Childhood friends too cute to bear
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Rwandan mother and son separated for 20 years reunite in Cairns

Refugee sends computers to Congolese hospitals
ABC Far North

By

Frances Adcock

Posted

October 27, 2016 16:44:28

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Pascasia Nyirashaka and her son Dennis Bemeliki each want to make a mark on their community. (ABC Far North: Frances Adcock)
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Cairns 4870
“This country is like heaven. “My friend said to me, I saw a boy that looked like you in the Congo, he’s like you, his face is like your face,” Ms Nyirashaka said.”So, I went into migrant services and told them, then I started ringing him and getting to know him again, telling him his story.”I was scared about meeting him again, but then I saw him and I just held him for 30 minutes and thought ‘Oh my god’.”For 20 year-old Dennis Bemeliki, the reunion was an emotional one. I want to work. “I now work in childcare in Cairns and I love it. I want be a nurse and one day make a documentary to inspire others. “She sent me some pictures and then I was convinced. This is the best country.” “I then walked from the Congo to Angola for one year and then Angola to Zambia trying to avoid the violence that followed.”I was so hungry for a few years, and for a year I was just eating leaves.”When I was walking from Angola to Zambia I was pregnant with my son. “Now I am here I have so many things I want to achieve. I don’t want to take any government help. I couldn’t sleep knowing I had a family in Australia. I like working, earning my keep. I work a lot but the kids love me. “It was hard to convince me I had another mum, so during the time before I met her we spoke a lot on the phone,” Mr Bemeliki said. (ABC Far North: Frances Adcock)
‘For a year I was just eating leaves’ Close to 1 million people were brutally slaughtered in just three months during the Rwandan genocide in 1994.Fleeing the violence as a refugee, Ms Nyirashaka travelled across three countries, walking more than 1,200 kilometres in three years. “I walked from Rwanda to Congo and gave birth to my daughter Ester. Pascasia Nyirashaka feared she would again never see her eldest son alive after they were displaced by the Rwandan genocide in 1994.The mother of seven was given refugee status in Australia 16 years after she last saw her son.”From 1994 I hadn’t spoken to him. It was hard to be together.” ‘It was hard to convince me I had another mum’ A chance discovery by a friend of Ms Nyirashaka’s who had travelled from Cairns to the Congo began the lengthy process towards their reunion. It took seven months to get there and this was the last time I saw my husband but not my sons,” Ms Nyirashaka said. “I want to give people hope.”

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Ms Nyirashaka and Mr Bemeliki now enjoy spending as much time as possible together. “I have also worked as a cleaner. I am so lucky. We didn’t know he was still alive,” Ms Nyirashaka said.”My husband and my two sons Dennis and Joseph went into the jungle during the violence, and that was the last I saw of my two sons.”My husband was a Tutsi and I was a Hutu, so we dispersed. A mother and son separated by war, then reunited in far north Queensland after 20 years, say they want to make a difference to their community. I carried my daughter on my back.” ‘This country is like heaven’Living in Cairns now, life is very different for the family. I was a teacher in my country,” Ms Nyirashaka said.
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Law award for former refugee haunted by human rights abuses

Louis Kristopher has worked closely with the African community in Perth, offering free legal advice and mentoring young people, to try to give back to the community.Mr Kristopher said the images of war that haunt him were the same images which gave him the strength and determination to pursue a career in law.”So many human rights abuses … those things still keep lingering in my mind and it will continue to be on my mind for a very long time,” he said.”I’ve witnessed people being shot right at a point-blank range, very close, even civilians.”Fleeing war-ravaged South Sudan at a young age, Mr Kristopher’s family ended up in the Agojo refugee camp in Uganda around 1989, and it was there he started going to primary school. (Supplied: Louis Kristopher )
He provides free legal advice to people who need it most and represents others for discounted rates.”All that I know that as a person from my upbringing, if you want people to do good things for you, you have to do good things for people,” he said.”I believe you fall down and you get up, you fall down and you get up. Photo:
Mr Kristopher, pictured among a crowd of children, spent his school years at the refugee camp. A Sudanese-born lawyer who grew up in a refugee camp in Uganda has won an industry award for his contribution to criminal law in Western Australia. Photo:
Mr Kristopher ended up at the refugee camp after his family fled South Sudan. That is life.”Mr Kristopher was nominated for the junior criminal lawyer award by one of his colleagues, but never thought he would receive the honour.”I really had to take a deep breath in and just try to understand what was it that was happening,” he said.But Mr Kristopher said the greatest honour came from his nine-year-old son, who told him he wanted to follow in his footsteps.”I want my children to understand that Dad never gives up,” he said. (Supplied: Louis Kristopher)
“Lack of proper education, a lack of sanitation, there was shortage of food, there was almost shortage of everything you can talk about growing up in the refugee camp,” he said.”That was some of the things that as a person I really had to overcome and just say look I have a life to live, regardless of whether I eat or not today, I just have to press on.”Now a criminal lawyer in Perth after having moved to Australia in 2004, Mr Kristopher wants to give back to the nation that took him in.”If Australia was not to help me, I wouldn’t be able to give back to the society the same way,” he said.
By

Courtney Bembridge

Updated

October 27, 2016 23:47:35
(ABC News: Courtney Bembridge)

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Louis Kristopher mentors young people and offers free legal advice to those who need it most.

Migratory bird haven in SA declared national park

(Chris Purnell, Birdlife Australia, file) Photo:
Banded stilts are native to South Australia.

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Birds flock to Adelaide sanctuary from northern hemisphere
Birds of the Adelaide sanctuary

(Chris Purnell, Birdlife Australia) Photo:
Australian pied oystercatchers call Thompson Beach on Adelaide’s north-western coast home.

(Chris Purnell, Birdlife Australia) Photo:
Red-capped plovers are beach-nesting shorebirds that breed in Australia.

(Chris Purnell: Birdlife Australia) Photo:
Red-knots are among migratory birds seen on the coastal plains of Adelaide’s northern fringe.

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Migratory birds make journey from Alaska to Adelaide
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Migratory birds from northern Asia inspire artists
A sanctuary which attracts thousands of migratory birds annually from the northern hemisphere has been proclaimed Australia’s newest national park.The Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary is now a national park covering 2,457 hectares of shorebird habitat in the Saint Kilda area just north of suburban Adelaide.South Australian Environment Minister Ian Hunter said it was a haven for birds and the national park declaration would promote tourism interest and help protect the coastal region’s water quality.”[It] means we’ll be able to have it listed as an international flyway venue for the migratory birds that come down every year from Mongolia, Alaska and Siberia,” he said.”It will just give greater attention to such a wonderful park that’s located so close to the city of Adelaide.”Mr Hunter said the park would help protect the coastal region stretching from Barker Inlet to Point Parham.”We’ll certainly see a lot of interstate tourism but also a fair share of international tourism,” he predicted.”[To] see these birds elsewhere you have to trek out a long, long way [without] the comforts of international hotels an hour away.”I suspect Adelaide will be a must-go place to see birds of this nature.”The Kaurna Aboriginal nation backed the declaration and the national park will also be known as Winaityinaityi Pangkara.Kaurna elder Jeffrey Newchurch described the area as a “hidden treasure”.”With the Kaurna people, [dual-naming] brings that return to country and through that it uplifts one’s spirit,” he said.”It makes us work together to secure this for future generations.”

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Thousands of red-capped plovers inhabit the Dry Creek salt lakes. (Chris Purnell, Birdlife Australia)

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Bar-tailed godwits make the journey to South Australia to feed before heading back to eastern Siberia and Alaska to breed. (Chris Purnell, Birdlife Australia)
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About 27,000 birds from more than 200 species have been recorded in annual migration to the Adelaide region. (Chris Purnell: Birdlife Australia)

By Tom Fedorowytsch

Posted

October 28, 2016 16:53:01

‘You’re not just in a cell’: Sailing program helps troubled youth

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Judge Libby Armitage from the NT Local Court. A sailing program in Darwin is trying to help young people who have been in contact with the courts and juvenile detention.The pilot project is part of a new court-based approach to youth services, which is being trialled by Northern Territory community groups and lawyers.Kenny, 14, is one of the teenagers who featured in the Four Corners program about youth detention and has just graduated from the sailing course.”You learn to work together as a team and then learn other things,” he said.”You’re not sitting in a cell, you’re out here having fun, swimming or sailing.”Mission Australia program manager Marcelo Alvarez has been supporting Kenny and other young people during the five-week course, run by Darwin Sailing Club instructors.”We wanted to create a program or an activity where we could engage with young people and give them life skills,” he said.”We all make mistakes in life and these kids have made mistakes.”I think a lot of people, a lot of society these days, just give up on young kids and people forget that we were all young once.”‘It’s the first thing I’ve achieved’

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Sailing instructor Lisa Denvir and course participant Joseph prepare a yacht for sailing. (ABC News: Felicity James)
“The court is able to immediately see a willingness from children to say ‘yes’, they want to be involved in the program,” she said.”Many of these kids have been exposed to significant traumas, many traumas, in their short lives and so they have real difficulty in forming meaningful relationships with other people.”This kind of program steps in to start to try and change some of those behaviours and to fill in some of those gaps for kids who might not be completely comfortable or safe at home, for kids who might not feel completely safe at school.”The program’s managers admit sailing is not for everyone but, according to Judge Armitage, it is one example of an activity that can challenge and engage young people.”There are lots of different opportunities to engage with kids,” she said.”It could be cultural connections in community, learning cultural skills, engaging with elders.”It’s about effectively identifying what would interest a child, to get them involved in a group, but really to create that opportunity to foster nurturing relationships.” (ABC News: Felicity James)
North Australia Aboriginal Justice Agency lawyer Jared Sharp referred Kenny to the course and said bringing youth services into the courtroom ensures young people get the help they need.”Because the service is here at court it means that as a lawyer I don’t have to say to my client, ‘go to an appointment’ with a particular service in two week’s time and hope that they get there.”We can’t wait until the royal commission’s completed, we need to start putting things in place now like this new model of court-based services.”Judge Libby Armitage from the Northern Territory Local Court said the court-based services approach meant programs like the sailing course could immediately form part of a child’s court orders. (ABC News: Felicity James)
Kenny said receiving a certificate in sailing at a graduation ceremony last week was a huge moment for him.”It was the first thing I’ve achieved, something good, something that everyone notices,” he said.Darwin Sailing club instructor Lisa Denvir said the nationally recognised course did not “cut any corners”.”The person who’s steering is taught responsibility because they’re driving the boat, so they’re the captain of the boat,” she said.”If the boat tips over and everybody’s in the water, it’s their job to make sure that everybody’s safe.”Kenny said he was “100 per cent” sure he would not be going back to the Don Dale youth detention centre.Sailing course could form part of court orders

Photo:
Sailing course participants Kenny, Joseph and Malik take their yacht out on Darwin Harbour.
Detention centres 'not places of rehabilitation', royal commission hears
Video shows teen prisoners tear-gassed, 'tortured' in NT
(ABC News: Felicity James) By Felicity James

Posted

October 31, 2016 01:32:01

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Course participant Kenny has just completed a certificate in sailing at the Darwin Sailing Club.

Is Black Caviar’s foal the next big chance in Australian horseracing?

Australian Story

By Belinda Hawkins

Posted

October 31, 2016 06:01:10

Video: Oscietra is one of three offspring to be birthed by champion racehorse Black Caviar. (ABC News)
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Two-year-old filly Oscietra could not possibly know the expectations that are pinned on her as the offspring of Black Caviar, Australia’s greatest sprinter and a racehorse with a legendary status equal to that of the great Phar Lap. She also holds the record for the most Group 1 wins.Black Caviar was retired in 2013 as she was nearing her eighth birthday.”I had nothing that could match it with her,” then-rival trainer Hayes said.”As her opposition trainer I was thrilled she was retiring; she was unbeatable, and she’s the best mare I’ve ever seen and probably ever will see.”Moody recognised Black Caviar was special the moment he first saw her.”She just had a presence about her, an action about her, every time she took a stride every part of her body moves,” he told Australian Story, which had unparalleled media access to Black Caviar throughout her racing career.”It’s like walking down the beach and seeing certain parts of someone’s anatomy wiggle or that and you just can’t help yourself, you’ve got to turn around and have a look.”

Video: Take a look back at Black Caviar's career

(ABC News)
Finding the right partnerCo-owner Pam Hawkes said Black Caviar had her choice of partners.”We were mindful of Black Caviar’s big bulk and we were advised not to go with a big horse again initially, [as with] two big horses we could have ended up with Clydesdale and not too many win races,” she said.Ms Hawkes said the owners also did not want Black Caviar’s breeding potential damaged by any tearing involved in the birth of a large foal.”We went with Exceed and Excel and we can’t be happier with what we’ve got,” she said.”Oscietra is a compact horse, perfect in conformation, not as big as her mother but … we’re hoping she’s got the mother’s big heart and the mother’s will to win.”

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Oscietra was the first foal for Black Caviar. (Supplied: Georgina Lomax)
Hayes takes over training reins from MoodyUntil Moody retired earlier this year, Oscietra’s owners had hoped that he would train the filly.In December 2015 Moody appeared before the Racing and Disciplinary Board in Melbourne on three charges relating to racehorse Lidari having too high a cobalt reading. He received a 12-month suspension, with six months suspended.Moody then announced he was retiring.”The whole ordeal I think just got on top of him and he’d had enough,” Hayes said.No plans to sell Black Caviar’s offspringBlack Caviar’s five owners decided not to sell any of the champion’s three offspring — two fillies and a colt. Key points:Black Caviar’s offspring Oscietra due to race from AprilOscietra’s silks will be green with five black circlesDavid Hayes appointed as Oscietra’s trainer
In her third week with trainer David Hayes, Oscietra cuts a striking figure in the ‘picture postcard’ pretty foothills of the Strathbogie Ranges in north-east Victoria.”We’re all very excited to get her,” he said.Hayes told Australian Story he hoped to have Oscietra ready for racing by Easter next year.”She’s probably one of the best-bred fillies in the world.”The name Oscietra is a play on her mother’s lineage.”Black caviar is pretty expensive to get but this particular caviar [Oscietra] evidently is priceless — so I hope she is,” Hayes said.”She’s got a tricky name.”We know her as ‘Black Caviar’s daughter’ and her nickname is Gerty, so we’d rather just keep her as Gerty.”

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Stable foreman Ben Brisbane rides Oscietra during training. Video: David Hayes says Oscietra has a "wonderful temperament"

(ABC News)
“Whenever Peter was mentioned, he was always Black Caviar’s trainer,” Ms Hawkes said.”So anybody who didn’t know her would assume that, ‘Oh well, she was only good because she was on something’, and she wasn’t.”Black Caviar’s samples had been tested and were negative.”In March this year the board cleared Moody of all but a lesser charge of administration of cobalt without intent to Lidari. (Supplied: Pam Hawkes)
“We’ve created some new silks for Oscietra and we’ll keep those for the boy and for the next girl as well.”The new silks retain the five black circles representing both caviar and the five owners, but are set against green.Hayes has been measured in his assessment of the filly.”Oscietra is a lot smaller than what Black Caviar was but she does have her temperament and she’s a lovely easy mover, and in about three weeks we’ll see what speed she’s got,” he said.”She’s just learning to gallop, but every stage she’s gone through she’s doing it with flying colours, as I imagine Black Caviar did.” If Oscietra is anywhere near as competitive as Black Caviar, Hayes said the syndicate “would be just absolutely thrilled”.”It’s so hard to win a race anywhere let alone do what mum did,” Ms Hawkes said.”It would be a miracle if it happened again.”Watch “The New Black” on Australian Story, 8:00pm ABCTV. (ABC News: Belinda Hawkins)
When it was clear Moody would not reverse his decision, they asked Hayes to train Oscietra.Ms Hawkes is now eagerly following Oscietra’s progress through weekly video diaries that Hayes emails to her and others connected to the young horse.”Oscietra has massive shoes to fill because the weight of expectation and possibility is always going to be riding on her back,” she said.Ms Hawkes hoped the filly would get a chance to fulfil her own potential, rather than always being compared to her famous mother.Taste of caviar in Oscietra’s silks

Video: Oscietra's silks will feature five circles to represent the five families who own the horse. (ABC News: Belinda Hawkins)
Black Caviar’s record-breaking careerTrained by Peter Moody, Black Caviar won her first race in 2009, beginning a record-breaking run of 25 wins from 25 starts. (ABC News)
Ms Hawkes said Oscietra’s silks are already designed ready for when the filly hits the track.”We’ve retired Black Caviar’s colours so Oscietra and her siblings won’t be burdened by the salmon and black that’s just so recognisable as Black Caviar’s colours,” she said. Photo:
Oscietra is in training for her first race next year. Photo:
Black Caviar shares a moment in the stables with Oscietra as a foal.

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Black Caviar – the road to glory
'I'm over it': Moody content to walk away from training
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Caper white butterflies flock to Brisbane

612 ABC Brisbane

By

Jessica Hinchliffe

Updated

October 31, 2016 14:28:34

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The caper white butterfly is known for its beautiful underwings. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
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Brisbane residents have been trying to photograph the fast moving caper white butterfly. “They’ve then grown up … (Supplied: Tina Jensen)
The butterfly is mostly white but has distinctive black edging around its wings and yellow and white blotches on the underside of its hind wing.Dr Chris Burwell, senior curator of insects at the Queensland Museum, said the combination of good rain and warm conditions in the west had encouraged the butterflies to breed.”The caper white refers to the plant they feed on,” Dr Burwell told 612 ABC Brisbane’s Steve Austin.”They’ve gone crazy and laid lots of eggs on caper trees and they’ve hatched out into caterpillars. Thousands of caper white butterflies from western Queensland have migrated to the south-east in search of food.Residents in suburbs throughout Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast including Mansfield, North Lakes, Manly, Redcliffe and the Glass House Mountains have reported sightings of the butterflies in “plague-like proportions”.The caper white butterfly is most commonly found in the west of Queensland and in New South Wales, on the other side of the Great Dividing Range. and masses of butterflies have emerged.”This type of species are known to migrate and move long distances to find food.”

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Many motorists have driven through hundreds of butterflies around south-east Queensland. (Supplied: Suzanne Lowe)
Talkback callers to 612 ABC Brisbane and fans of the station’s Facebook page have been keen to share their experiences with the butterflies.Rebecca from The Gap: “We went outside the house and saw about five or six on the driveway and then we drove the kids to school we saw hundreds of them flying in the one direction.”Geeta from Moreton Bay: “The butterflies have been going non-stop through the northern suburbs and they’re just beautiful.”Wendy from Murrumba Downs: “My grandson is a cyclists and trains each day and after his ride yesterday he said, ‘Grandma I’ve been riding through clouds of butterflies, it was so cool’.”Janelle Kane: “I drove through hundreds of them on Tuesday and thought it was massive confetti.”Dr Burwell said wind conditions had also enabled the butterflies to travel further this year.”It depends on the winds, whether they go south or east and we’ve had some westerly winds,” he said. External Link:

Caper white butterflies
But the butterflies will not stick around for long.”Some will potter about here but there’s not many of their native food plants here,” Dr Burwell said.”The butterfly migration will continue for another week but it won’t be a huge amount of time.”