Bundaberg builder calls out graffiti vandal to offer blank canvas

They all got stuck in and learned the rights and wrongs of where you should and shouldn’t use graffiti.”The mural itself depicts hands intertwining, a section which represents what the city went through during the 2013 Australia Day floods and the importance of standing together as a community.”That’s basically the big message: stand as one as a community and helping one another through tough times like the floods, which we all came out of stronger,” Mr Zeilke said.”It was really to push the community message — we can all work as one, especially for these kids.”Getting into the habit of an eight-hour dayThe jobseekers involved in creating the mural are part of a program called Xtreme Turnabout, where young people who may have stepped outside the law get a second chance.Now some of the jobseekers are doing regular work experience with Mr Zielke’s construction company. we got in touch with other graffiti artists.”Working together with a local employment organisation, Impact Community Services, as well as street artist Jamie Kirby, a giant mural was created.”We got a group together that have been charged previously with graffiti offences,” Mr Zielke said.”[We] set up a workshop to show these guys that there is another way to use a spray can which can be of benefit to the community.”We got them to do a street art mural on our upcoming display home. It doesn’t really worry me because in the end … External Link:

JRZ Homes Bundaberg facebook post
“I looked at it and thought, ‘well, there is no point in wasting police resources’; it’s not something that I think they need to waste their time on,” Mr Zielke said.”I thought there has got to be a way to try and have a better outcome.”A post on social media followed, calling out the tagger and offering them an opportunity, and the possibility of a job.”We looked for the culprit with a Facebook post that went a bit viral,” he said.”We never actually got the details of the artist. (ABC News: Gary Rivett)
He says the biggest surprise for him has been the reminder that not everyone is used to a full day of work.”The biggest hurdle we’ve found initially has been trying to get them to achieve an eight-hour day,” Mr Zielke said.”They’re quite good at chucking sickies but there has been a definite improvement,” he said.”It’s going to take while but anything worth having is not usually easy, so hopefully they will get there; they will get there — we’ll make sure they do.”I’ve got a business, a pretty successful business, so I’ve got the opportunity to help these guys.”I think it’s important, when given the opportunity, to try and help.”I really love this community [and] if you support it, it will support you and I just want to try and help where I can.” It is a fairly common sight on construction sites across the country — graffiti tags covering business signs, logos and temporary fencing.Meet the Bundaberg builder who, instead of calling the police, put the call out offering taggers an opportunity to design and develop, not deface.On a particular construction job in Millbank, a suburb of Bundaberg, builder Jesse Zielke noticed a graffiti tag or two on his company’s signs.He did some investigating and found the same tag sprayed on other walls and buildings in the area. Photo:
Young jobseekers are doing work experience with Mr Zielke’s company.
ABC Wide Bay

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Brad Marsellos

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August 08, 2016 08:00:01

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Bundaberg construction business owner Jesse Zielke with the completed mural. (ABC Wide Bay: Brad Marsellos)
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Unique recycling project using highway waste to protect riverbanks

ABC Mid North Coast

By Emma Siossian

Updated

August 08, 2016 11:00:15

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Tree stumps and rocks from mid north coast recycling projects are being used to protect kilometres of riverbanks (Supplied: Office of Environment and Heritage)
Mr Schmidt said the project also had follow-on environmental benefits.”Bank protection structures are usually made entirely of rock, so this timber will deliver nearly 100 tonnes of additional carbon into the estuary food chain, as well as providing a habitat niche for an extra one hectare of mangroves and promote fish habitat,” he said.”With RMS support, highway partners Lend Lease, Pacifico, Thiess and OHL Construction have provided around 600 stumps, 1,600 timber pins and 120 tonnes of rock, most of which has been delivered onsite at the river restoration project.” “So I had to prepare a list of materials I would need and it was amazing the goodwill that was out there among the different highway partners.”This unique project is a good example of how landowner willingness and collaboration between many stakeholders can help bring about coordinated action to improve the health of estuaries on the north coast of New South Wales,” he said. An innovative recycling project is using leftover tree stumps and rocks from Mid North Coast highway projects, to protect local riverbanks.The project was started by John Schmidt, an Office of Environment and Heritage Senior Coast and Estuary Officer.Mr Schmidt said tree stumps, timber and rocks from highway clearing between Port Macquarie and Urunga were being supplied by Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) at no cost.He said his initial aim was to install protection measures for up to four kilometres of river banks.”Since the idea two years ago, we have about two thirds of it complete or underway, so that’s about 3.5 kilometres committed to restoration with materials ready to go and funding to make it happen,” he said. “So it’s been a fantastic response, given that when we started it was just an idea with no funding.” Mr Schmidt said the project had taken a lot of careful planning and he had received strong support along the way.”I had to work out realistically how much one could achieve over a five-year period, so my objective was to get four kilometres of river fixed up in five years, so that was allowing one kilometre of river in each of the main river valleys,” he said.
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High-speed internet revolutionises medicine in remote Vanuatu village

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Until recently, residents of the remote village of Naviso, in Vanuatu, had to hike an hour up a mountain just to get mobile phone reception.
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(Pacific Beat)
Medical specialists too busy for regional patients
(Supplied: Alexis Cullen)
New frontiers in health and education, says PMVanuatu’s Prime Minister, Charlot Salwai, launched the telemedicine system in the village this week, declaring that information and communication technologies (ICT) could open up new frontiers in health and education for people across the country.The villagers themselves raised the funds for the project, which has been described as the first community-led ICT initiative in Vanuatu, if not the Pacific.”It’s become an open Wi-Fi connection and the whole community can use it,” Ms Cullen said.”The school has connection to the internet as well and they’ve started to incorporate it.”Ms Cullen said locals and health workers would receive training and support in telemedicine for another six months.She said the new technology had already been eagerly embraced by villagers.”It’s been incredible. And patients needing emergency medical treatment had to be carried by stretcher up the 500-metre incline and across Maewo island to the nearest hospital.But the arrival of a high-speed internet connection — and the country’s first telemedicine system connecting remote nurses to physicians — means these challenges could soon be a thing of the past. It’s so amazing to watch someone for the first time use the internet, and especially the ability to video conference,” she said.”We had a 90-year-old man come out of his house and make his way over to the clinic, demanding he see the magic box that could make him see a face in another place.”

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An elderly man in Naviso sees internet video conferencing for the first time. Photo:
The satellite dish providing internet is installed next to Naviso’s health clinic. (Supplied: Alexis Cullen)
Alexis Cullen, a US Peace Corps volunteer adviser for projects in telemedicine, told Pacific Beat the presence of high-speed internet in the village has already helped save the life of a pregnant woman, after a nurse connected with a doctor via Facebook.”Using his old informal network of his colleagues, he found someone to help him before we had even finished setting up our telemedicine link,” she said.”It was very helpful because he was alone in the clinic and he was very worried about what to do about this mother.”He immediately had the ability to speak with a trusted colleague who could help him and coach him through it, whereas before he had no one — it was only him to make these decisions.”

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Maowo islanders connect to the internet via a smartphone. (Supplied: Alexis Cullen)
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Pacific Beat

Updated

August 08, 2016 12:33:16

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A doctor in Santo provides medical advice to a nurse in Kerepei Village via Skype. (Supplied: Alexis Cullen)
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Remote village in Vanuatu to get high-speed internet for telemedicine

(Pacific Beat)

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Kosovo wins first ever medal … and it’s gold

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August 08, 2016 14:02:15
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Then came Mr Thomas Bach,” Kelmendi said.”A year ago, he came to Kosovo and said: ‘I’m here to support you and I want to see you win in Rio.'”Today he said: ‘You remember that you had a dream; now you’ve realised it.’ It made me very proud.”Kelmendi took control of the final from the start, pinning the 21-year-old Giuffrida quickly to score her single point yuko.Highlighting her reputation for nerves of steel, Kelmendi never gave up her slight advantage.”Everyone in Kosovo has watched my combats and expected to see me win. External Link:

Storify: Celebrating Kosovo's first ever Olympic medal
ABC/AFP The woman who won Kosovo’s first ever Olympic medal hopes the golden honour sends a message to young survivors of war that “they can do anything they want”.Rio is Kosovo’s maiden Games, and judo star Majlinda Kelmendi claimed the historic win, beating Italy’s Odette Giuffrida by yuko in the women’s 52kg final.Kelmendi, 25, sank to her knees in tears after the event, and then ran to hug a small group of supporters chanting “Kosovo, Kosovo!””I have always wanted to show the world that Kosovo is not just a country that has gone through war,” Kelmendi said, with her nation’s flag draped around her shoulders.Kelmendi said she hoped to inspire Kosovo’s younger generation, who she said “look to me as a hero”.”I just proved to them that even after we survived a war, if they want something they can have it,” she said.”If they want to be Olympic champions, they can be. Even if we come from a small country, a poor country.”I just want to say to the young generation of Kosovo that they can do anything they want.”In 2008 Kosovo declared its independence from Serbia — whose forces fought to stop breakaway rebels in 1998–99 — and has since had its own scrap for recognition.Every sign of statedom counts, and Kelmendi faced so much spotlight in the months before the Games that she went into hiding with her coach to train.She emerged to show her pride carrying the Kosovo flag at the Olympic opening ceremony.”This medal means a lot, not only for Kosovo’s sport, but for all Kosovo as a country,” she said after the win.”We have survived a war. There are still kids who don’t know if their parents are alive, don’t have anything to eat or books to go to school.”So the fact of becoming Olympic champion is just huge for all of us.”
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Rio 2016 tweets with photo: Majlinda Kelmendi wins first gold for Kosovo
About 100 countries have given their diplomatic stamp to Kosovo, which has been recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for less than two years.IOC president Thomas Bach presented Kelmendi with the gold.”I had so many things going on on my mind when I was on the podium. That is why I was so motivated,” she said.Japan’s Misato Nakamura and Russia’s Natalia Kuziutina won the bronze medals.Kelmendi fought for Albania at the 2012 London Games, before Kosovo had its IOC badge, and went out in the second round.She has won two world titles since, however — including one in Rio in 2013 — and that made her the favourite going into the final.
Vietnam wins first ever Olympic gold medal
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Gold medalist Majlinda Kelmendi says the win means a lot for her nation. (Getty: Pascal Le Segretain)

Behind the scenes in Andy Griffiths’ and Terry Denton’s treehouse

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Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series. (ABC: Patrick Wood)
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Australia

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Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series. (ABC: Patrick Wood)
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Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton's workshop
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Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton in their writing workshop. (ABC: Patrick Wood)

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Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series. (ABC: Patrick Wood)
(ABC: Patrick Wood) Photo:
Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series.
(ABC: Patrick Wood) Photo:
Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series.

NAPLAN 'meaningless' as a test of creative writing, say Treehouse authors

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Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series. (ABC: Patrick Wood)

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Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series. (ABC: Patrick Wood)

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Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series. (ABC: Patrick Wood)

(ABC: Patrick Wood) Photo:
Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series.
(ABC: Patrick Wood) Photo:
Andy Griffiths’ workplace where he writes the Treehouse series.

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I got these books and they started reading’,” he said.”You realise we’re doing something really, really important.”The pair understands the challenges the digital age poses, particularly with books competing against game consoles, computers and phones.”I’m very aware there are many other competing forms of entertainment,” Griffiths said.”I think books have risen to the challenge and they can offer something all those other things can’t, which is a very personalised imaginative experience where you bring a lot to that book.” (ABC: Patrick Wood)
“It’s very difficult to say where it all starts and who develops it,” Griffiths said.”We’ve been working together for 20 years now, so I’m often second guessing where Terry could go or what he’s capable of, then I try to get something even better than that.”Denton said he and Griffiths drove each other to ever greater levels of silliness and creativity.”That sense of pushing each other to new levels, I think that’s a pretty powerful part of it, and part of the fun of it too,” he said. and have gone on to collaborate on the best-selling Just and Treehouse series, which combined have sold more than 3.5 million copies.The 65-Storey Treehouse, released last year, was the fastest-selling Australian book ever, and the sequel has just been released.Griffiths writes the words and Denton is in charge of the illustrations. Photo:
A colourful collection of oddities inside Griffiths’ workplace. (ABC: Patrick Wood)
Perched on under-sized kids’ chairs, the pair reflected on the importance of reading for children and how the silly and spectacular books can be a gateway into more complex texts.”When I became a secondary English teacher I met a lot of kids who [didn’t read much],” Griffiths said.”It just seemed they were missing this huge dimension in their lives, so that’s what really started me attending to, how do you write a book that convinces a non-reader that reading is worthwhile and exciting?”Denton said watching children enjoy his books inspired him to keep going.”[It’s] the parents in particular coming up saying, ‘They didn’t read before. Griffiths said Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland were an inspiration, while Denton was drawn to the Mad Magazine and Peanuts classics.Tapping in to what modern children enjoy is the key to their success. Photo:
Many unusual relics can be found inside the workspace of Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton. Walking into Andy Griffiths’ workspace, you would be forgiven for thinking you had stumbled into a 9-year-old’s dream.Every surface is covered with toys, books, gadgets and gags. Photo:
A bottle of Andy Griffiths vomit takes pride of place. If you still had any doubt that this was a room for fun and imagination, the plastic vomit on the ground and the jar of “Andy’s own vomit” would set you straight.Among all the gadgets, there is one thing that takes pride of place: a six-foot model treehouse based on the best-selling Treehouse series, complete with bowling alley, swimming pool and “Maze of Doom”.Griffiths and his creative partner, Terry Denton, spend hours hidden away in this studio out the back of Griffiths’ Melbourne home.”When we get together in this room we get in touch with our 9-year-old selves and it just happens,” Griffiths said.The pair started working together with the 1997 book Just Tricking! (ABC: Patrick Wood)
Sometimes, however, the pair needs to be reined in just a bit.”Luckily we have Jill, my wife and editor and really co-writer these days, she will tell us when we’ve gone too far,” Griffiths said.”She’ll say, ‘Look, you’re amusing yourselves now with this abstract, insane humour’.”The pair grew up reading classic stories from Enid Blyton and Dr Seuss.
ABC News Breakfast

By

Patrick Wood

Updated

August 09, 2016 12:16:57

Video: Inside Andy Griffiths' and Terry Denton's workshop

(ABC News)

‘Fish nerds’ put finned friends on show at Ekka 2016

(612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
“There are 23 different categories ranging from live bearing fish through to large fish, goldfish, novelty tanks and planted tanks,” Mr Baines said.”Judges look for five things — colour, fins, body, condition and deportment, which is how the fish acts.”

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Head steward Steve Baines looks at one of the fish entered in the Ekka competition. Self-proclaimed fish nerds are celebrating a record number of entries in this year’s pisciculture section of the Royal Queensland Agricultural Show.Aquarium enthusiasts have travelled hundreds of kilometres from throughout Queensland with their own tanks, water and fish to put their prized cold-blooded possessions on show.The pisciculture section highlights the breeding and rearing of fish under controlled conditions.Steward Steve Baines said this year’s competition had seen a record 121 entries including tropical fish, Siamese fighting fish and crowd favourites, Nemo and Dory. Photo:
Fish tanks show various entries in a variety of pisciculture categories. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
Mr Baines said this year’s competitors in the novelty tank category had shown “great creativity”.”One entrant has built a Game of Thrones display where they have the white wall and they have used white Mexican walking fish,” he said.”The theme of their novelty tank is The White Walkers; I think that’s quite clever.”Goldfish break records A record 35 entries in the goldfish category were also received this year.Mr Baines said the goldfish were always the hardest to judge due to their unique features.”Generally we only have about six goldfish entries,” Mr Baines said. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
Mr Baines has been part of the Ekka every year since 1984, making sure his prized fish are always on display for show-goers.”We’re fish nerds and it gives us the chance to rave on about our fish,” he said.”We’re very competitive just like cattle and horses; we’re serious about our judging.”Novelty tanks draw crowdsThe competition had seen entrants enter not only their fish, but their decorated aquariums as well. Photo:
Entrants are encouraged to create novelty tanks for their fish entries. (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe) (612 ABC Brisbane: Jessica Hinchliffe)
“Each of the goldfish are worth more than $300 and their characteristics have to be spot on.”When the Ekka draws to a close on Sunday, each of the competitors will have to clean and empty their tanks to travel home.”It’s interesting packing up [with] more than 100 competitors all wanting to drain their tanks out one little drain and get their prized fish home,” Mr Baines said.”It’s always mayhem, but it’s worth it.”

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Judges use rulers and illustrations to judge each fish on their deportment, body and fins. Photo:
Goldfish wait to be judged.
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Woodchopping toddler 'has the makings of future Ekka champion'
CWA classics revamped for Queensland's obese rural communities
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August 09, 2016 12:18:29

Video: The Ekka has welcomed a record number of fish entries in this year's pisciculture section. (ABC News)

The fight to save Africa’s ‘lost Eden’

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Bob Poole in Africa

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Bob Poole has filmed a six-part series on the Gorongosa National Park in partnership with PBS and National Geographic. (Supplied: Gina Poole)

(Supplied: Gina Poole) Photo:
Conservationists are trying to restore the elephant population in the Gorongosa National Park.
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Hippos frolic in Africa. (Supplied: Piotr Naskrecki)

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Bob Poole said illegal mining and logging still threatened the park in Mozambique. After 30 years of war, it was really decimated,” he said.”The habitat was still there but the wildlife was almost all gone.”When civil war broke out in Mozambique in the late 1970s the Gorongosa National Park became a key battleground between opposing forces.Elephants were killed for their ivory, which was traded for guns and ammunition, and zebras and other animals were hunted for their meat.”The park was pretty much left for dead,” Poole said. (Supplied: Gina Poole)
He first visited the Gorongosa National Park in 2008 and said he was staggered by how the wildlife had been killed or driven out.”It was one of Africa’s greatest national parks. Photo:
The elephant population in the Gorongosa National Park is recovering after years of poaching. (Supplied: Gina Poole)
These days, Poole said illegal mining and logging still threatened the park, but new initiatives had given him reason to hope things could slowly improve.Specifically, a public-private partnership struck between the Mozambican Government and a team led by philanthropist Greg Carr in 2008 had seen a noticeable turnaround in the park’s fortunes.The 20-year deal sees Carr, the Government and international bodies work to conserve the park and attempt to bring back wildlife that has been lost. exploded back onto the scene,” he said.”If you come back in 20 years and go to the centre of that national park, it will be incredible.””If we just give it a chance or give it a bit of help — especially in a place like Africa, where nature is so resilient — it can bounce back.Poole said the message he will be spreading on his tour around Australia this month was: “Conservation in Africa is a tough job, it just never goes away.””This is hope for African wildlife if we all care about.” The way that the wildlife just … For wildlife as well as conservation,” he told ABC News Breakfast.Poole grew up in East Africa, where his father was the director of the Peace Corps and later the African Wildlife Foundation. The fight is on to save Africa’s “lost Eden”, a national park buried in Mozambique recovering from decades of civil war, documentary-maker Bob Poole says.Poole, an Emmy Award-winning filmmaker for National Geographic, has spent years documenting conservation efforts in the Gorongosa National Park.He is in Australia for the Nature Roars Back tour to share what he has discovered.”Gorongosa roughly translates to a place of danger, and in some ways that rings true. Photo:
The Gorongosa National Park is recovering from years of civil war. (Supplied: Gina Poole)
Poole said the difference for the park in just eight years was impressive, but it had to be sustained.”What I saw in my time there was extraordinary.

(Supplied: Gina Poole) Photo:
The Gorongosa National Park is a stunning piece of Mozambique.

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Lions are slowly coming back to the Gorongosa National Park.
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Documenting the fight to save Gorongosa National Park. (Supplied)

ABC News Breakfast

By

Patrick Wood

Updated

August 09, 2016 16:34:59

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National Geographic filmmaker Bob Poole on saving Africa's "lost Eden"
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Elephants roam the Gorongosa National Park.

Brazilian rugby player gets surprise on-field wedding proposal from girlfriend

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Australia's rugby gold in Rio hailed as victory for women's sport
(AP: Themba Hadebe) Posted

August 09, 2016 20:24:43

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“I have to make this special”: Cerullo’s partner surprises her on the rugby pitch.
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Brazilian rugby player Isadora Cerullo has been surprised with an on-field wedding proposal following Australia’s win in the first women’s rugby sevens event in Olympic history at Rio’s Deodoro Stadium.Cerullo’s partner of two years, 28-year-old Marjorie Enya, walked onto the pitch as the crowd were dispersing following the final, and popped the question.Enya, who is a manager at the venue, grabbed a microphone and delivered an emotional speech before embracing her partner to the cheers of onlookers, the BBC reported.”I know rugby people are amazing and they would embrace it,” Enya told reporters.”She is the love of my life.”
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Isadora Cerullo tweet from Danielle Warby
The couple live in Sao Paulo, where Cerullo has been focussing on training for the inaugural Olympic event.Cerullo, who is a dual US and Brazilian citizen, was reportedly studying medicine in the United States before she was selected for Brazil’s Olympic squad.”As soon as I knew she was in the squad I thought I have to make this special,” Enya told the BBC.Twitter erupted with congratulations from around the world for the newly minted couple, with well-wishers tweeting photos, rainbows and hearts.Same-sex marriage has been legal in Brazil since 2013.Hosts Brazil beat Japan 33-5 to finish in ninth place overall in the 12-team women’s draw.
Multi-sport athletes star in Aussie Olympic rugby sevens gold

Best in show: Judges lip-smacking search for Perth’s top ice-cream and gelato

Judging cheese and chocolate at the Perth Royal Show
(720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
“You have to get the right sugar levels, the flavour levels and the really good quality ingredients in there.”I think because it’s such a difficult one, I really love it when I get one where I go: ‘oh wow, that is just a fantastic vanilla’.”I really appreciate the workmanship that has gone into it.”And for those that long to eat ice-cream for a living, there is hope. Photo:
Karen Reid will taste over 50 ice-creams in a few hours of judging. It’s a tough job but someone has to do it.Judges have spent a day at the Perth Showgrounds Dairy Pavilion tasting an array of ice-creams and gelatos, looking for the best in show.Although the Perth Royal Show does not kick off until September 28, entries have already closed for the many food, produce and cookery competitions and judging is well underway.On Tuesday, two teams of judges taste tested just over 100 entries. Photo:
An ice-cream flavoured with dried apricot. Photo:
Each category is judged by three people. Sometimes no entries in a class will get a medal, and sometimes several will.At the end of the class judging, overall best ice-creams and gelatos will be chosen.”We will really see some fantastic product when we get to that,” chief judge of the dairy and cheese competition Russell Smith said.’Very picky to find the best’The Perth Royal Show provides ice-cream makers a rare opportunity to have their product professionally evaluated. “Where you are tasting milk, milk is all the same product.”When you taste strawberry, vanilla buttermilk cake, shiraz, wild berry and cracked pepper in gelato it is hard to rule out personal preference and just judge on the technical aspects.”

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Chocolate, mint and red velvet cake ice-cream competing at the Perth Royal Show. “We are just being very picky here to find the best ones.”What’s the trickiest flavour?According to Mr Smith, one of the hardest flavours to make was plain vanilla. (720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
“I think the main thing is to have it peer reviewed, to see where the quality of their product sits against all their competition in the marketplace,” Mr Smith said.”I don’t think it can go horribly wrong in ice-cream — even the ones that aren’t terribly good, a lot of people are still going to enjoy them. “There is nowhere to hide with vanilla,” he said. “They are always looking for new judges,” Ms Reid said.”You do need experience in the dairy industry, and an interest.” (720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
And just like wine tasters, the judges spit and avoid swallowing.”It is a bit gross, isn’t it?” ice-cream judge Karen Reid said.”But when you taste 50 odd dairy products, if you eat them all, by the time you get to the third session your tastebuds are dead.”Spitting is required, as is water and eating water crackers in between classes.”Occasionally an entry was unexpectedly awful and “and that is when the spit bucket is really handy,” Ms Reid said.Buttermilk, pepper and wine flavoursIn the ‘gourmet gelato with real fruit, excluding any chocolate’ class, the judges were presented with a wide variety of flavours.”It’s difficult in a class like gelato where you get completely different flavours,” Ms Reid said. (720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
Judges award scores out of 20 for each entry, giving points for flavour, aroma, texture and appearance.An entry has to score over 18 to get a gold medal.
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10 things that never change at the Perth Royal Show
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Emma Wynne

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August 10, 2016 09:19:58

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Chief judge Russell Smith tastes a gelato (720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)
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Beer brewing a mix of science and art, competition judges say

‘This is why we do the Olympics’: North and South Korean gymnasts pose for selfie

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Olympic diving pool's strange green water overshadows events
(Reuters: Dylan Martinez) Updated

August 10, 2016 09:49:47

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Lee Eun-ju of South Korea takes a selfie with Hong Un-jong of North Korea.

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It is being touted as a photo that defines the spirit of the Olympics — North and South Korean gymnasts posing for a selfie at the Rio Games.During a practice session, 17-year-old Lee Eun-Ju of South Korea and 27-year-old Hong Un-Jung of North Korea laughed and chatted and took a photo together.The moment was captured by another photographer and shared around the world on social media by users including political scientist Ian Bremmer, who tweeted: “This is why we do the Olympics.”The photo has been praised for capturing a moment of sportsmanship and unity, amid hostile relations between the two countries, which technically remain at war because was no peace treaty signed at the end of the 1950-53 Korean War.In 2008, Hong became the first female gymnast from North Korea to win an Olympic gold medal, while Lee made her Olympics debut in Rio.Lee was eliminated in Sunday’s preliminary competition, while Hong will go on to compete in the vault final. (Reuters: Dylan Martinez) Photo:
Lee Eun-Ju made her Olympics debut in Rio.

Facebook post attracts hairdresser to Blackall

a lot of people went away to get their hair done, and every boy had a haircut by their mother.”It’s just good to have someone in town.”Mayor delighted by Facebook response

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Blackall-Tambo mayor Andrew Martin shows the Facebook post that helped to attract a hairdresser to Blackall. One little Facebook post has made a huge difference to the outback Queensland community of Blackall, helping to attract a hairdresser to town.Blackall had been without a permanent hairdresser for several months, meaning locals were forced to travel hundreds of kilometres for a professional cut.Blackall-Tambo mayor Andrew Martin posted on Facebook in June, asking for hairdressers to contact the council about moving to town and setting up a business.The post caught the attention of Rockhampton hairdresser Tiffiany Kraatz, who lived in Blackall for several years as a child.Within weeks, Ms Kraatz, her husband Jeremy, and their four children had moved to town.She said locals had been overwhelmingly positive about her new salon.”They’re all really supportive. we wanted a different lifestyle for the kids,” she said.”They’ve been able to ride to school and they play a lot of sport, and just have the freedom they wouldn’t have had growing up in Rocky.”You couldn’t ask for a better lifestyle out here.”

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Blackall-Tambo Mayor Andrew Martin says there is a feeling of optimism around Blackall after a difficult few years. Everyone’s come in, and everyone’s really happy with their hair,” she said.”I’ve had some really good compliments from the locals and the tourists. Everyone seems so supportive, so it’s good.”Ms Kraatz said the relaxed Blackall lifestyle was what had attracted her and her family back to the bush.”Rocky’s obviously really busy … (ABC Western Queensland: Blythe Moore)
Hairdressing a vital service in bush townsMs Kraatz said she believed access to a hairdresser was important for people in small towns.”Everyone likes to look nice and tidy,” she said.”I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t want to look scruffy around the place, and people have events they’ve got to go to in other towns.”I think most towns should have a hairdresser.”She said the absence of a hairdresser had impacted Blackall in a variety of ways.”On my first day a little boy came in with his mum, and his mum had cut his hair and she asked me to fix it,” she said.”[It is] hard because if they have no one to do anything like that, it shows.”Blackall local Amanda Turlan said she was delighted to see a hairdresser back in town.”Everyone’s happy, everyone’s got good hair now,” she said.”I think girls just waited … (ABC Western Queensland: Blythe Moore)
Cr Martin said he had been inundated with responses to his Facebook post.”I got a Facebook reply from a girl in Russia, several from Indonesia, Port Macquarie, Melbourne, Perth, Townsville, and this wonderful woman from Rockhampton, called Tiffiany Kraatz,” he said.Cr Martin said he hoped the new salon was the beginning of a positive trend for Blackall.He said the town had suffered from the drought and the demise of the wool industry in recent years.”The history of Blackall, as you well know, over the last decade has been people leaving town and kids leaving the school,” he said.”And all of a sudden one little Facebook article and [we have] four kids back in town and a girl going into business.”After his successful Facebook post, Cr Martin said he had become a social media convert.”It’s a great way of disseminating information when your nearest neighbour is 100km away,” he said.”As a council, we’re now looking at doing our own Facebook page for the councillors and myself.”
Welcome to Blackall — the town with no hairdresser
(ABC Western Queensland: Blythe Moore) ABC Western Qld

By

Blythe Moore

Posted

August 10, 2016 14:52:09

Photo:
Tiffiany Kraatz straightens Amanda Turlan’s hair in her new salon in Blackall.

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Blackall 4472
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Retired farmers recruited to help tree changers

(ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky) ABC Central Victoria

By

Larissa Romensky

Posted

August 10, 2016 16:56:13

Photo:
Retired farmer Noel Jenner has become part of the Connors’ family.
“Well, I’m off the land, what else do I do?” she recalled.”That’s when This Farmer Needs a Farm was born.” The idea coincided with a local government community funding scheme that Ms Connors successfully applied for.”I have found this project is just really needed within the community. A community project that enlists the help of retired farmers to assist tree changers on their land and help improve connections has been started in Kyneton.When Melissa Connors and her family moved to their 4-hectare property in Kyneton four years ago, they did not know much about hobby farming.Having previously come from a small block in the outer suburbs of Melbourne, they needed a different set of skills to tackle livestock, fencing and water management.”We did things backwards. I think most people do, and just keep in your little circle,” Mr Jenner said.But a chance meeting between Mr Jenner and Ms Connors changed both their lives for the better.Even though they waved to each other twice a day when Mr Jenner went past the property on his daily walks, Ms Connors said it took him three years to finally “warm up” to her and have a conversation.Ms Connors was curious about his dedication to walking, and Mr Jenner’s response to her question was the catalyst for the project. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
Mr Jenner, 78, is well equipped for the job, having previously worked on his wife’s family’s 56-hectare dairy farm in Gippsland. That’s the constant feedback I get,” Ms Connors said.”This is basically a platform for [farmers] to butt in and help, because we need their help.”We get up here and we have these dreams of this beautiful idyllic property, then the reality hits.”Ms Connors said many young families were moving to the country and buying land, and in some cases the husband was away working.”If things go wrong and David’s not home, I have to take care of it,” she said.Farmer now part of the family

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The Connor family (from back left) David, Eire, Melissa, Neil Jenner, (front left) Aidan and Siobhan. We’d come out and they’d be on the road,” Ms Connors said.”We knew nobody and we didn’t know what to do.”We just found ourselves on a really steep learning curve.”After meeting and befriending local retired farmer Noel Jenner, the idea for community project This Farmer Needs a Farm was born.”It’s about creating a platform for tree changers, like myself and my family, who have moved up to our plots of land and know absolutely nothing about working them, getting our retired farmers to share their knowledge and build our farms into what we want them to be,” Ms Connors said.She said the farmers could be involved as much as they wanted, taking the form of a one-on-one partnership or within a group, depending upon the different needs of the community.”The bottom line is, it’s getting this knowledge out of these guys’ and women’s heads,” Ms Connors said.She said the project was trying to tap into an existing knowledge base by creating connections and encouraging people to talk.”Rather than sitting behind your computer screens to find the answers,” Ms Connors said.Feeling isolated after leaving the farm

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Melissa Connors and Noel Jenner have formed a friendship after three years of waving hello to each other. We get on very well together, and we do lots of things together and it keeps me busy,” he said.He hopes more retired farmers get involved in the project.”They’ve got nothing else to do. They should get involved and come on board,” he laughed. We put six black Angus steers on it before even looking at the fences. Although he does not miss rounding up cattle in the dark, moving off the farm and into town proved harder to maintain connections, leaving him feeling isolated.”As you get older you sort of stick to your own and just keep to yourself mainly. We have a lot of good times together,” Mr Jenner said.Ms Connors said Mr Jenner even walked the family dog, and her children enjoyed his company.”It’s been a fantastic and unexpected friendship, and I’m really lucky to have Noel in our lives,” Ms Connors said.Mr Jenner said it was important he was making a difference and had found something meaningful in his own life.”It’s a lovely relationship. (ABC Central Victoria: Larissa Romensky)
The relationship has been more than just Mr Jenner providing general farming advice around the property and recommending tradespeople.The pair has also developed a strong friendship.”We’re very good friends.
Map:
Kyneton 3444

How running is transforming a Torres Strait island community

(ABC Rural: Charlie McKillop)
Training for a marathon in seven monthsIt is a path Elsie knows only too well. With Elsie encouraging from the sidelines — “C’mon bala, you can do it! “For the majority of people who come here and choose to be a part of the program, 60 seconds of non-stop running is massive for them,” Elsie said.”So you imagine me telling them they’ve all run three minutes, and you see how they celebrate, the joy and excitement.”

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Elsie Seriat never imagined the positive change running would make in her island community. Keep pushing hard” — they dare not stop until her piercing whistle sounds again.These are members of the TI Deadly Runners beginners’ group, who together are embarking on the road to positive change, one step at a time.At first, the improvements are incremental, but the self pride is evident. Now I can run a full kilometre without stopping,” said Carolyn, who has lost eight kilograms since starting with the Deadly Runners. Rural news in your inbox? “Before, I couldn’t run for 10 metres. Photo:
Elsie Seriat and Harold Matthew after completing the New York Marathon in 2014. Today she has brought along her friend, who readily admits “running is not my thing”.”The first whistle’s hell,” her friend laughed. Barriers to healthy living are complexStatistics show the Torres Strait mirrors the alarmingly high rates of obesity on the mainland — more than two-thirds of people aged over 15 are obese — and diabetes and heart disease are primary health concerns.The barriers to losing weight on TI can be complex. As the group sets off together, some walk, some run, some shuffle. When she and Harold Matthew became the first Thursday Islanders to join the Indigenous Marathon Project three years ago, she never imagined what they would achieve. (Supplied)
“It’s a mixed emotion for me, yeah, because I can see myself in that same situation when I first started running — coming from a zero running background in seven months to be able to run a marathon,” Elsie said.”So you know, coming back into the community is a perfect example for my people to see if I can do it, they can do it, too.” When Elsie crossed the finish line of the New York marathon in 2014, it was only the beginning, not the end of her journey. Photo:
It is all smiles after another session for the TI Deadly Runners beginners’ group. “But the second whistle’s good because you get to walk again!”But amid the laughter and mock protests, each runner has their own reason for being here, and everyone is pushing to their limits. (ABC Rural: Charlie McKillop)
Marathon training was a lonely path for the young trailblazers.Today, the Deadly Runners group is gaining momentum, with up to 60 members attending beginner and advanced sessions.Even Elsie’s partner and mum have become regular runners.In the local general store in the main street, a new sports section has replaced aisles of electrical goods as a growing band of runners vote with their feet.”My word of encouragement to others is just to get off the couch; that’s what it’s all about, people choosing to do that,” Elsie said. For example, when Elsie’s fellow marathon buddy Harold began training, friends noticed his weight loss and were worried he was sick and needed more kai kai (food). Subscribe to get the national headlines of the day. She returned home to TI determined to help others to embrace the healthier, active lifestyle she had discovered.
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ABC Rural

By

Charlie McKillop

Updated

August 18, 2016 09:40:29

Photo:
Members of the TI Deadly Runners group stretch out after a regular interval training session (ABC Rural: Charlie McKillop)
The shrill of Elsie Seriat’s whistle cuts through the pre-dawn stillness of her island community.It signals the start of an interval training session for the 20 or so people who have gathered on the foreshore at Thursday Island (TI), a small island in the far northern waters of Australia.

A Big Country: Islanders embrace a healthy lifestyle

(ABC Rural)

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Pull on your running shoes to join the Thursday Island Deadly Runners for interval training

(ABC Rural)
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Thursday Island 4875
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New York Marathon beckons Thursday Island Deadly Runner

Dubai plane crash survivor wins $1m in airport lottery

Updated

August 11, 2016 07:13:47

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Mohammad Basheer Abdul Khadar was on this Emirates plane when it crashed and burned in Dubai (AFP: Gulf News Dubai/Ahmed Ramzan)
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Passengers describe fleeing burning plane following Dubai crash-landing
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“I live a simple life, and now that it’s my time to retire, I feel like God gave me a second life when I survived the plane crash, and blessed me with this money to follow all this up by doing good things,” he told Gulf News. It has been an eventful few days for Mohammad Basheer Abdul Khadar, an Indian living in Dubai. Key points:Mohammad Basheer Abdul Khadar bought a lottery ticket on his way to IndiaComing back to Dubai, he was on board an Emirates jet which crashed and burned on the runwayHe says some of his $US1m will go to help impoverished kids in Kerala
In the space of a week, he survived a crash-landing at Dubai airport then won $US1 million in a lottery organised by the airport’s duty free operator, Gulf News reported. Video: The Emirates plane burns on the runway

(ABC News)
Mr Khadar has lived in Dubai for 37 years and is married with two children, one of whom is paralysed after a fall early on in his childhood, reported Gulf News.Mr Khadar said he was planning to return to Kerala to retire and would use the money to help children in Kerala who need financial support.He said he earned around $US2,200 a month, and would continue to work as long as he could.”Nothing else can give you the satisfaction of your hard-earned money,” he said. Video: Chaotic scenes as passengers try to evacuate burning Emirates plane

(ABC News)
AFP The 62-year-old was flying home from holidays with family in India when the Boeing 777 in which he was travelling caught fire on landing with 300 people on board.The accident last week shut down the Middle East’s busiest airport for several hours, forcing authorities to cancel hundreds of flights.All the passengers and crew escaped unharmed, but a firefighter died tackling the blaze.Just six days later, Mr Khadar discovered that the lottery ticket he had bought on the way to India was now worth $1 million.A fleet administrator with a Dubai car dealership, Mr Khadar told Gulf News he habitually bought a lottery ticket on his way to visit family in the southern Indian state of Kerala.Ticket number 845 in the Millenium Millionaire draw at the airport’s Dubai Duty Free proved to be his winning shot.

On-the-job training for people with disability through the Yellow Door

“I like helping people and interacting with people,” he said.Paula Ryan is a volunteer with the shop, and said it was very rewarding to see the trainees building their skills.”The interaction the clients have with the general public, their improved sense of humour, seeing them manage the EFTPOS and computers, it’s very rewarding to see that capacity building,” she said.Ms Ryan said as far as the customers were concerned, service at Yellow Door was just like any other local shop.”For the general public, it’s not an issue, and that’s the key point — it’s not an issue.”Mr Searles said the aim was to see their clients move on to other paid work or volunteering roles in the community.”As we progress with the program the intent is to look for local businesses who might partner with us to give placements to people with disability, so they can test out the skills they’ve learned at Yellow Door Books in other retail settings,” he said.Mr Searles said HSA did not currently receive funding to run the program, and the introduction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme could mean a promising future.”The program at Yellow Door Books is targeted at motivated individuals who have identified gaining employment, paid or unpaid, as one of their goals,” Mr Searles said.”The retail program provides formal training in a supportive environment that’s also a functioning business.”Therefore it offers real on-the-job training, with real customers, rather than simulated training.”In the future under the NDIS when people have their own funding and they’d like to use that for skills development, this would be one of the programs they may consider as an option.”Certainly from the feedback we’ve had we think it’s a program that could be quite attractive.” Photo:
CEO of the Home Support Association Grant Searles (left) with Yellow Door Books staff member Jenny Reeve and Ben Kelly from Rockhampton who is in training at the shop. A social enterprise on Queensland’s Capricorn Coast is giving people with a disability an opportunity to get job-ready and build their confidence and skills.Yellow Door Books in the coastal town of Yeppoon is a social enterprise run by Central Queensland non-profit Home Support Association. Six people with disabilities are currently in training at the shop, learning everything from social skills to technology.Their jobs include sorting, cataloguing and preparing for sale books donated to the shop, customer service, cash handling and using EFTPOS terminals.Home Support Association (HSA) CEO Grant Searles said they took on Yellow Door Books as a means of providing training for people with disability.”To see the growth in our clients as individuals is proof enough the program’s working,” Mr Searles said.”Confidence would be the biggest change we see.”When people first start the program they can be reluctant to be involved, particularly in customer service, but soon that’s a part of the program they really look forward to.”I have discussions weekly with clients, and that’s the first thing they want to talk about — how many sales they’ve made, and how they’re able to use the technology.”Ben Kelly from Rockhampton is currently in training at Yellow Door.He said the social interaction was the highlight of the job.
Map:
Yeppoon 4703
ABC Capricornia

By

Chrissy Arthur

and

Jodie van de Wetering

Updated

August 12, 2016 08:30:36

Photo:
Yellow Door Books volunteers Yvonne White and Paula Ryan say the increase in confidence in the clients coming through training at the shop is wonderful to see.